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October 18, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-18

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PAGE SIAM

THE MiCIGAN DAIY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1946

U.S. OF SOUTH AMERICA?
Chilean Cites Need of Latin
Neighbors for U. S. Support

By BOB HARTMAN
The military and political might
of the United States was cited Wed-
nesday by Dr. Enrique Marshall,
Secretary-General of the University
of Chile, as the, most pressing need
of the Latin American countries.
Marshall, who arrived here Tues-
day, stated that only small countries
remain weak, and that South Amer-
ica is a "weak big country" which
needs the help of the United States.
The proposed unification of all
Latin American countries advanced
by Victor Raul Haya de la Torre,
APRA (People's Party) candidate
for Peruvian president, was termed
by Marshall as "impossible".
"From a political point of view
the union of Latin American coun-
tries, organized like a United States
of Latin America, would be theo-
retically advisable, but from a
practical point of view it is im-
possible because for every Latin
American country, from an econ-
omical, military and political ap-
Traffic Survey
Made by AAA
Lights Are Needed at
State St. Intersections
Results of a campus traffic survey
made by the Automobile Club of
Michigan will be presented to Ann
Arbor Common Council Monday, ac-
cording to local AAA officials.
Working in conjunction with Ray
Eastman, chairman of the Ann Ar-
bor Planning Commission, the AAA
has made traffic counts at congested
campus intersections. Eastmen told
newsmen that traffic conditions on
S. University and S. State Streets
have shown the need for additional
traffic light installation. It is be-
lieved that the commission will rec-
ommend installation of control lights
on S. State in front of the Union and
at the intersection of N. University,
Eastman said.
Plans for a completion of the sur-
vey were mapped out at a meeting
yesterday by Eastman and William
Potts, Detroit Auto Club engineer.

proach, the connection with the
United States is more important
than the connection with other
Latin American countries."
He reavealed that the United
States has begun an Economic De-
velopment Corporation in Chile with
the help of the Exoprt Import Bank
of Washington, D.C., to aid Chileans
in improving their economic life.
"This corporation has three pur-
poses," Marshall said, "First, the
foundation of an iron and steel com-
pany in Chile; second, to install four
hydroelectric plants for industrial
use; and third, to supply experts' aid
in developing oil discoveries made in
1945."
The EDC is now ofganizing a com-
pany to exploit these oil deposits for
the country.
As principle speaker before the In-
ter-American Bar Association Con-
gress in Santiago last year, Mar-
shall pointed out the necessity of
collaboration between Latin Ameri-
ca and the Anglo-American countries
in all phases of economic life.
"We must become a rich coun-
try; this is our first duty. We are
going to do this by economic de-
velopment and by re-vamping and
expanding our educational facilit-
ies along the lines of Anglo-Saxon
American countries."
"But the Chilean government,
from the beginning of our indepen-
dence, has been interested in the
development of our educational sys-
tem," Marshall maintained.
The population of Chile is small
which makes the maintainence of
rural school systems difficult, Mar-
shall explained. He added that many
of the city children are so poor that
they are not able to attend school be-
cause they do not have enough cloth-
ing.
The Chilean school system is con-
structed along Latin - Continental
lines with a six year high school and
only professional schools comprising
the colleges. Chile is preparing to re-
organize its schools in accordance
with the U.S. system.
Church News

UI'Alumnus
Is Emcee for
Varsity Night
Show Features Band,
Faculty, Student Talent
A Michigan alumnus, Steve Fili-
piak, '39 Lit, will act as master of
ceremonies for the 1946 edition of
Varsity Night to be held Oct. 25 at
Hill Auditorium under the sponsor-
ship of the University of Michigan
Concert Band.
Prof. Andrew White of the Music
School and one-time member of
Fred Waring's organization, will ren-
der a baritone solo of "De Glory
Road." Soprano Rose Derderian, a
senior in the Music School and re-
cent winner of the Philadelphia La
Scala Opera Award, will be a fea-
tured soloist.
The program's emcee, Steve Fili-
piak, is a well-known personality
among Ann Arbor radio listeners. He
has been production manager of sta-
tion WPAG for the past year and
was one time heard on the ABC
coast to coast morning program,
Club Matinee.
Tickets for Varsity Night will be
sold in conjunction with Home-
coming Dance tickets, starting Sat-
urday morning at the booth outside
Rm. 1 in University Hall.
New Station.. .
(Continued from Page 1)
versity plans a big program expan-
sion.
University lectures at Hill Audi-
torium or the Natural Science Build-
ing may be piped to the station.
Music from the carillon, the Uni-
versity Band and symphony orches-
tra also will go on the air, as well as
University sports events.
The University Broadcasting Serv-
ice will subscribe to a transcription
service. Present plans call for a spe-
cial director of orchestral programs
from the School of Music.
Prof. Abbot said it is his belief
that the University will cooperate
with other educational institutions
within its primary area of broadcast-
ing and vill maintain a truck
equipped with high-fidelity record-
ing equipment.
He expects to transcribe programs
at Albion, Hillsdale, Adrian, Ypsi-
lanti Normal and other near-by
schools.
Walkie-talkie equipment will be
used to send man-on-the-street pro-
grams to the studio, and wire re-
corders will be used to bring inter-
views from campus buildings.
Twenty-two thousand modulation
sets are calculated to be in the area
to be served by the University.
Only six educational frequency
modulation stations are now in use
in the United States, according to
Prof. Abbot. The University and the
Detroit Board of Education have
the only permits so far accepted in
Michigan by the Federal Communi-
cations Commission.
Veterans...
(Continued from Page 1)
of the dissolution of such previous
marriage.
DEPENDENCY: If veteran is
claiming dependency allowance, the
VA will furnish a special form to be
filled out and notarized. In addition
a copy of the veterans birth certifi-
cate must be submitted. If applica-
ble, a statement from the dependent's
physician is desirable.
CHANGE OF ADDRESS: In order
to insure delivery of subsistence

checks it is necessary that the vet-
eran keep the VA informed of any
changes of address.
CHANGE OF PLACE OF TRAIN-
ING: If the veteran wishes to enter
training at a different institution,
the following information must be
submitted to the VA:
1. Courses presently being taken
and name of institution.
2. Course veteran wishes to pursue
and the name of the institution he
will attend.
3. Reasons for change.
4. A request for a supplemental
Certificate of Eligibility and Entitle-
ment.

Campus Group
Opposes High
Prices of Meat
MYDA Seeks Aid of
Students, Residents
A committee to, campaign against
exorbitant meat prices was set up
today by Michigan Youth for Demo-
cratic Action following a report by
the educational committee that meat
prices have risen from 50 to 100%
in Chicago and 100% in New York.
Fears of inflation and a subsequent
depression led MYDA to prepare for
action as soon as the results of meat
decontrol are apparent. An appeal
will be made to local residents and
students who eat out or buy from
local stores not to pay exorbitant
prices for meat or any other com-
modities which might be decontrolled.
Plans were also made for a co-
ordinated drive to get 150,000 signa-
tures on a petition for state FEPC
Local groups which will join in the
drive are the Lawyers Guild, IRA and
AVC.
Union Petitions Due
Petitions for the positions of Un-
ion vice-presidents, senior class of-
ficers, and co-chairmen for the fresh-
man, sophomore and junior dances
will be due at noon tomorrow.

MICHIGAN CHEERLEADERS-The University cheer ing squad found itself and the crowd in the top condi-
tion of the season at the Army game.'

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Strategy
50-Yard Li":

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for
"Dash"

Parties with an informal atmos-
phere will be given by many of the
student religious organizations to-
day.
Old clothes will be worn by mem-
bers of the ROGER WILLIAMS
GUILD at a Work Party at 8:30 p.m.3
at the Guild House.
The CANTERBURY CLUB will
present an afternoon tea for club
members from 4 to 6 p.m.
The "Cactus Hop," a dance with
a Mexican theme, will be given by
the NEWMAN CLUB.
Membership cards will be used
for admittance.
A "Sports Evening" will be pre-
sented by the BETHLEHEM EVAN-
GELICAL AND REFORMED STU-
DENT GUILD at 8 p.m. in the
church's chapel, 423 South Fourtht
Ave.
Group games, dancing and refresh-
ments will be included in the "Grid-
Grind" to be given by WESTMIN-
STER GUILD at 8:30 p.m. in the
Social Hall of the Presbyterian
Church.
MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN . FEL-
LOWSHIP will hold a business meet-
ing for all members at 7:30 p.m. in
Lane Hall.
In place of the regular Friday
services, IZFA will present an Oneg
Shabbat at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at 7:45 p.m. today.
Diamonds
S and
~ Wedding
$ 8i INGS
9+
717 North University Ave-..-

by
MISS SEVENTEEN

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