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October 17, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-17

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- .t-,^ -

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1946

Thomas Illustrates Scientific
Basis of Electronic Principles

"No magic" was the key phrase last
night as Dr. Phillips Thomas, re-
search engineer of the Westinghouse
Electric Corporation presented a
striking demonstration of various
principles and applications of elec-
tronics in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Reviewing the research that led
finally to present-day radio, Dr.
Thomas pointed out that the length
of time required to develop radio
might have been shortened consider-
ably if it were not true that "we are
all as lazy mentally as we dare to be."
Too many scientists, he said, are
prone to relax their efforts after they
have achieved only part of the final
goal.
The prowess of the photoelectric
cell was visibly demonstrated as Dr.
Thomas regulated his floodlights by
flashlights and lighted matches.
Equally effective was a sensitive con-
trol device developed by Dr. Thomas
himself that responds to the human
breath.
With the cooperation of members
of the audience, Dr. Thomas showed
how the human voice is transmitted
on a beam of light. He also showed
how the stroboscope can make a rap-
idly revolving propeller appear to
stand still.
In a Daily interview, Dr. Thomas
declared that radar devices, now in
use in air and sea travel, will even-
tually be adopted also for land trans-
portation. He said that, to the best
of his knowledge, airplanes involved
in recent crack-ups were either not
equipped with radar or their pilots
had not been instructed in the correct
use of radar.
"We are now working on a method
for modulating radar, much as radio
is modulated," he said, "but so far we
have not been very successful."
Scientific Societies
Plan To Meet Here
For the first time in seven years,
the annual combined meetings of
the Central States Branch of the
American Anthropological Associa-
tion and the Society for American
Archaeology will be held in Ann Ar-
bor, Prof. Volney H. Jones, of the
Museum of Anthropology, announced
yesterday.
The scientific and business meet-
ings will take place on or about May
16 and 17, Prof. Jones said, and will
probably be held in the Rackham
3uilding. The scientific part of the
meeting will include reports on re-
search, theoretical contributions and
articles of general interest; the busi-
ness meetings will consist of such
matters as election of officers, reso-
lutions, and the treasurer's report.
THE WEATHER IS
FINE ON MAIN STREET
Especially at the
CUT RATE
STORE
MEN'S HDKFS., 7 for
Fine white cotton handker-
chiefs, neatly hemstitched

DR. PHILLIPS THOMAS

Annual Smoker
Is Presented by'
Sigma Rho Tau
"Wranglers Roundup" the annual
smoker of Sigma Rho Tau, engin-
eering speech society was held Tues-
day night. ,
The outstanding event of the even-
ing was a talk by Prof. Robert H.
Sherlock, of the civil engineering de-
partment. His topic was "The Prob-
lem of the Young Engineer and the
Labor Union."
The smoker was attended by more
than 120 people, Prof. Robert Brack-
ett, director of Sigma Rho Tau, told
the new members about the organi-
zation, its purpose, aims and the
annual events that are held..
The date of the exchange speakers
with the University of Detroit and
the Detroit Institute of Technology
was announced and an outline of the
scheduled debates with the Junior
Colleges of this vicinity was drawn
up.
The new members signed up for
the tentative circles they would join
next week and the circles will choose
the subjects for discussion at the
next meeting, Tuesday at the Union.
Anti-Lynch Group
Will Meet Tonight
A public meeting to urge Ann Ar-
bor citizens to join the American
Crusade to End Lynching will be held
at 7:30 p.m. today at 116 N. Fifth
Avenue.
Speakers will be Rev. John M.
Miles of the People's Institute of
Applied Religion, Abner Berry, Com-
munist candidate for Michigan Sec-
retary of State, and Robert Cum-
mins, Communist candidate oppos-
ing Michener in the Second Congres-
sional District.
*)<""">o<"""">o<"""=""o<""""o<"""">X <"X'"(*
FOR YOUR DANCING
PLEASURE
Thc
MAC K
FERGUSON0
SW IhNGT E T
MUSIC. That is!
For Available Dats
Call 9059

Manuscripts
To Be Shown
On Microfilm
Microfilm copies of irreplaceable
English historical and literary man-
uscripts and facilities for viewing
them are soon to be made available
to University research students.
War-born plans drawn up by the
American Council of Learned So-
cieties in 1940 call for negative cop-
ies of the documents, most of them
dating to between 1100 and 1600,
to be deposited in the Library of
Congress and positive copies in the
University's General Library.
When photography and catalog-
ing are complete, Michigan will pos-
sess the nation's only complete col-
lection of these documents accord-
ing to Miss Frances Hamman, who is
in charge of filing the University's
copies.
A special film room, equipped with
six reading machines will be made
available to any research student de-
siring to view the films.
'Tie complete collection, which at
present contains over 5,000 manu-
script copies, will provide access to
material previously available only
in England. The project is also de-
signed to provide against loss of the
priceless collection.
Other important microfilm col-
lections at the General Library in-
clude foreign scientific journals,
some early American periodicals, and
books printed before 1660.
Cooperative League
Chairman To Speak
Jerry Smith, of Michigan State
College, newly elected chairman of
the NorthAmerican Student Coop..
erative League, will speak on "Stu-
dent Co-operatives on a National
Scale," at 8:15 p.m. Friday, at the
Robert Owen Co-op, 1017 Oakland.
The Co-op League which Smith
heads, was formed this summer by
representatives from six regional
cooperative wholesalers, National
Cooperatives Inc., and the Coopera-
tive League of the U.S.A. to unify the
campus cooperative movements
throughout the country.
The meeting, which will be fol-
lowed by an informal discussion of
the student cooperative movement, is
open to all interested students.
Hold Your Bonds

PART OF THE MEAT-HUNGRY CROWD -- lined up at a Minneap-
olis, Minn., market to buy some of the 10,000 pounds of buffalo meat
offered for sale after the animals were purchased from a private herd.
The meat sold quickly despite prices ranging up to $1.75 a pound.
CONGRESS, THAT IS: - -
Both Your Houses' To Open
Season for Pla Production

Publication .n The Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Assistant to the
President, Room 1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30
p.m. on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).;
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1946
VOL. LVII, No. 21
Notices
School of Business Administration
Faculty Meeting will be held this aft-
ernoon in Rm. 110 Tappan Hall at 4
o'clock.
Assembly of the School of Forestry
and Conservation at 10:00 a.m. Fri.,
Oct. 18, in the Rackham Amphithea-
ter, at which representatives of the
furniture industry will speak. All
students in the school except those
with non-forestry conflicts are ex-
pected to attend. There will be an op-
portunity for students to meet and
talk with members' of the industry in
the E. Conference Room of the Rack-
ham Bldg. Others interested are cor-
dially invited to attend both the as-
sembly and the conference.
Transfer Students: Students ad-
mitted with advanced standing will
be taken through the General Library
on Fri., Oct. 18. Tours will start in
Rm. 110, General Library (which is
on the first floor near the West en-
trance) on the hour, beginning at 1:00
p.m. and continuing through 4:00
p.m.
Dormitories, Fraternities, Sorori-
ties, and League Houses: Any student
who is admitted to the University
Health Service ,Infirmary is respon-
sible for the notification to his or her
House Head of such action. A pay
Kappa Nu Active Again
Kappa Nu fraternity, which was
inactivated here during the war, is
reactivating this semester and in-
tends to open house by Thanksgiving,
Herbert Moore, one of the members,.
said yesterday..
Moore requested that any Kappa.
Nu members on campus call him at
3591.
North Main OppiOte Court House
-- Today and Friday
Virginia Bi ce in
"LOVE, HONOR*& GOODBYE"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,

phone is available on the 3rd floor
corridor near the admitting desk. Ex-
ceptions: In case of serious illness or
accident, the Health Service will be
responsible for notification.
Margaret Bell
Acting Director
School of Music Students expecting
degrees at the end of the current se-
mester should fill out diploma appli-
(Continued on Page 4)
Lawyers Guild
Will Sponsor
FEPC Petition
The University Chapter of the Na-
tional Lawyers Guild at its meeting
yesterday in the Union pledged sup-
port of the FEPC petition formu-
lated by the Detroit chapter of the
Guild.
Morton Lietson, newly elected
chairman of the chapter, announced
that elections were held for the exe-
cutive offices of the chapter for the
forthcoming term in addition to the
FEPC petition approval.
W. Lester Griffin has been chosen
as vice-chairman, Mary Elizabeth
Spivey, secretary, and Chaire Sher-
man, treasurer, Lietson disclosed.
"We intend to back the Detroit
chapter's petition and to aid in pro-
curing the necessary signatures here
in Washtenaw county," he added.
The FEPC petition, designed to
safeguard the civil rights of minority
groups and to promote fair employ-
ment practices by legislation, will be
circulated by the Guild for a month
after the day following elections in
an effort to secure a majority of sig-
natures. If they receive the requisite
number of signatures,. the petition
automaticalay goes before the state
legislature for a vote. If the bill is
defeated there, it is placed upon the
ballot for the next election; if it
is passed, it becomes law.
Several other states have already
passed such legislation.
The Guild will also sponsor five or
six lectures by nationally known in-
dividuals throughout the school year,
Lietson stated.

Play Production of thespeech de-
partment will open the season Oct.
30, in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, with "Both Your Houses," a sa-
tire about the Legislative branch of
our national government.
This 1933 Pulitzer Prize winner,
written by Maxwell Anderson, won
such favor on Broadway and on the
road by the Theatre Guild, that it
soon becam one of the most popular
MUSBE Books Must
Be Claimed Next Week
All books turned in to the Michi-
gan Union for sale last spring must
be picked up by their owners next
week or they will become the pro-
perty of the Exchange and will be
disposed of by the Student Book Ex-
change, manager Dick Burton an-
nounced yesterday.
The Exchange office in the League
will be open from 3 to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday to return these
books.

comedies ever to be offered either by
professional or amateur groups.
The local production will get under
way at 8:30 p.m. Oct. 30, with per-
formances nightly until Nov. 2. Tick-
ets may be obtained Oct. 28 in the
theatre box office with mail orders
being received before that date.
Hilarous to the final curtain, "Both
Your Houses" tells of the honest ef-
forts of a newly elected Representa-
tive at Washington which are direct-
ted towards combating raids on the
National Treasury by the appropria-
tions committee. Facing the boos of
his fellow Congressmen, and as a last
resort, our legislator drafts a ridi-
culous bill, which to his amazement,
is passed.
Threatened with exposure of their
crooked methods, the old-time party
leader feels "That it will blow over.
As a matter of fact, the natural
resources of this country in political
apathy and indifference have hardly
been touched. They won't get me.
No-I don't hardly expect it in my
time."

CLASSIFIE D ADVERTISING

Last Day Today
"KITTY"
with Paulette Goddard
Rlay Milland
-----and
"DRESSED TO KILL"
Friday and Saturday
"JESSE JAMES"
with Tyrone Power
and
"IN FAST COMPANY"

LOST AND FOUND

FOR SALE

Large size.
Special at 7 for $1

.00

MEN'S WOOL SOX
100% wools, also 50% and
73% wools. Crew styles.
Slight irregulars.
3 Pairs $2.75. ,
Argyle Plaids and Plain.
RAINCOATS
Plastic. Button
front. All sizes.
Officer Style Gabardine
Trench Coat. 95
$30.00 value. 24
GABARDINE SLACKS
Brown, blue,9
Pleats and zippers 4jf,
WHITE "T" SHIRTS
Small, medium
and large . . .
KNIT BRIEFS
Elastic all around
Full combed yarn
All Wool LOAFER COATS
Assorted color.95
combinations
Get in the habit of
Saving Money at the
CUT RATE STORE
Leather Jackets . ..10.95
Suede Jackets . . .12.95 up
Coverail srind Shn Cots

LOST: Black and gold Parker "51" be-
tween Rackham Building and League
Coke Bar. Reward. Call Room 200, Helen
Newberry, 2-2591. )85
LOST: Black Roadmaster bicycle with
white trim, white-sidewall tires, wire
basket, light, speedometer, horn, lock
and cable. Highland Park license 1764.
Call Tom Lough, 2-6173. )86
LOST: Maroon and gold Eversharp C.A.
pen, Monday. Please call Joan Levy, 2-
1046. Reward. )87
LOST: Silver link bracelet by W.A.B. Sat-
urday. Reward: Call Joan Broadbridge,
2-4514. )81
FOUR-SKIN MINK SCARF, lost Saturday
at E. University entrance to East Quad.
Sue Davis, 3718. )82
LOST: Grey Persian Lamb muff, in vicin-
ity of Washtenaw Ave., also binoculars
in stadium. Reward. Call 2-590-57. )83
LOST: Black Shaeffer Triumph fountain
pen. Initials F.M.A. on gold cap. Please
call Muriel Aaron, 2-2591. )50
LOST: Small black change purse. Con-
siderable amount money enclosed. Re-
turn to Irene Straub, 725 Church St.
Reward. )10
LOST: Slide Rule engraved "Hershel M.
Stimson" near East Engineering Build-
ing or Midway Boulevard Bus Stop, Wil-
low Run. Reward. Box 40, Michigan
Daily. . )8
KEEP THE MONEY if you like. But please
mail a tan leather purse and remaining
personal found Oct. 11, in League
Lounge to Dee Wilson, 1101 Church. )2
BUSINESS SERVICES
BOOKKEEPING AID for Fraternities, Sor-
orities, other institutions. Nominal mon-
thly charge. Telephone Charles Koethen,
2-4925 between 7 and 9 A.M.
WANTED: Dictation, typing and dicta-1
phone transcription, to do in my home.
Mail Box 56. )38
TUTORING
TRANSLATIONS : French, German, Span-
ish, Dutch. Tutoring French, Beginner's
Spanish, and English for foreigners. Call
Josh Grauer, 2-2325, noon or evening. )13
LANT E RN
613 East Liberty Street
GEORGE LUM, Prop.
'tween Michigan and

NEW 6x30 Hensoldt Binoculars with case.
German made, excellent for football
games. George Hoyt, 206 Tyler House,
East Quadrangle, Ph. 2-4591. )15
SPINET PIANOS - Baldwin, Story and
Clark. Immediate delivery. Ypsilanti
Piano Co., 402 E. Michigan Ave., Ph.
Ypsi 878. )73
CHRONOGRAPH Wrist Watch with sweep-
second hand and 45-minute stops. 19
jewels. 18 carat gold case. Perfect con-
dition; worn six weeks. Ralph Smith,
200 Greene House, E. Quad, 2-4591. )88
ALBERTA BEAVER coat and muff. Like
new. Medium size. Cost $1500.00, will sac-,
rifice. Also real leather facial chair.
Excellent condition. Dial 4838, Evenings
7-9. )78
FOR SALE: 1946 Webster Changer and
Amplifier, Speaker Unit. Original cost
$120. For $90. Contact Ted Liss, West
Lodge, Ypsilanti by card, giving phone
number and hour. )18
FOR SALE: Two pre-war tuxedoes, excell-
ent condition. One Hart, Schaffner,
Marx. Sizes 34-37. Accessories. Telephone
2-6240. )7
NEW "POWERBIKE." fully equipped -
lights, horn, basket, wide saddle, new
tires. Reasonable price. Phone 3759. )76
STUDENTS: solve your transportation
problems; ride an English lightweight.
3-speed gear, 2 caliper brakes, pump oil
bath chain guard. $79.50. CONTINENT-
AL SPORTS SHOP, 6453 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, LA-7237, 24253 Woodward Ave,'
Ferndale, Lincoln 1-2650. )23
HELP WANTED
ARE YOU BUSY Friday night? Do you
want to be the man of the hour? The
Casbah needs a good emcee. If inter-
ested call Penny Klausner, 2-5587. )84
THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL has open-
ings for men and women: Orderlies,
Porters, Nurses Aides, Serving Room
Helpers. Cafeteria available to employees.
Personnel office, first floor. )12
WE HAVE OPENINGS FOR five girls who
can work following hours. 4 p. m.-10:30
p .m.; 4:30 p. in.-11:00 p. in., 5:00 p. mn.
11:30 p. m., 5:30-12 midnight. You get
paid for 8 hours while only working

61 hrs. plus extra pay for working even-
ings. 2-15 minute relief during the ev-
ening and free cab service after 11h p.n.
Michigan Bell Telephone, 323 E. Wash.
)64!
MALE OR FEMALE FOUNTAIN HELP: 3
schedules available: 3-6 p.m., 6-10 p.m.,
3-10 p.m. If hlours suit your require-
ments, apply in person to Withams
Drug Company, corner of S. U. and
Forest. ) 34

WANTED

Starts Today

VET HAS URGENT NEED for "Sources of
English Constitutional History" by C.
Stephenson and F. G. Marcham. Call
William Burke if you desire to rent or
sell. Telephone 6293. )80
VET. Needs Used Car. Cash waiting. Call
6630. If party not home, leave phone
number with operator. )17
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14

plus
Jimmy Wakely in
"TRAIL TO MEXICO"
IIr r -'ea ~w R" or

Continuous from 1 P.M.
Now Playing!

iU

MISCELLANEOUS

i

EXTRA CONCERTS
MON., OCT. 28, 8:30
TICKETS: $1.50-$1.00-80c
SAT., DEC 14, 8:30
Repeat Performance
Cilki nyCr lZ 2.lnn

THE CAMPUS JAZZ GROUP still has three
open dates for after-the-game parties.
References furnished. Call Tom McNall,
2-4401. )3
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals--Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us.' Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. ) 45
SEWING: Alterations and repairs on wo-
men's and girls' garments. Let me keep
your wardrobe in good repair. Miss Liv-
ingston, 315 S. Division, 2nd floor front.
)17
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
0. R. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

I

Musical
"GOLDEN SLIPPERS'

Coming
Sunday!

ABBOTT & COSTELLO
"TIME OF THEIR LIVES"

WE TAKE SOLE HONORS
*Swith.
PADDED SOLE - SHORT ANKLES
50% soft wool "shorties" designed to provide greater
foot comfort for active sportsmen. Perspiration ab.
sorbent qualities make them a boon to tennis or golf
enthusiasts. A process of pre-shrinking reduces to a
minimutfnl any shrinkage later. Colors: Camel, canary,
white, French blue, and green.

Also Added
Cartoon "GOAL RUSH"
' | WORLD NEWS

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9

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ICUIGAN Now Showing

$1.00

pair

IF ffI ,. .: t !W } /l ' i.l K1. x _.___._.

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