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October 16, 1946 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-16

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1946

PAGE SIX WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1946
9

Dean Affirms
School's Ability'
To Fulfill Duty
Discussion, Counseling
To Supplement Classes
Confidence in the ability of the lit-
erary college to fulfill its obligation
to "good teaching" has been expressed
by Dean Hayward Keniston in an ar-
ticle in the current "Michigan Alum-
nus."
Pointing out the present impossi-
bility of finding enough skilled teach-
ers to conduct small groups of fifteen
or twenty students, Dean Keniston
emphasized that the college will be
able, however, to provide its 7,200
students with a sound and liberal ed-
ucation through an increased teach-
ing staff, breakdown of large classes
in all departments into small discus-
sion sections, an enlarged counseling
staff in which all members of the fac-
ulty contribute their services and a
variety of educational experiences not
limited to classroom and laboratory
work.
Faced with the necessity of in-
creasing its teaching staff by almost
50 per cent, the literary college, Dean
Keniston said, has solved this prob-
lem through the appointment of a
number of teaching fellows of "excep-
tionally high quality."
Dean Keniston explained an "on
the job" training program whereby
the more experienced members of
the faculty are planning the work
and supervising the classes taught by
these graduate students. He com-
mented that what the "newcomers"
lack in experience is made up in "en-
thusiasm, willingness to learn and
maturity of judgement and human
understanding."

Disposal Plant
Is Endangered
Increased Enrollment
Overloads Sewers
With the increased University en-
rollment, Ann Arbor's overloaded
sewage disposal plant is in danger of
a breakdown, according to C. Pres-
ton Witcher, superintendent of the
sewage treatment plant.
In a letter addressed to George H.
Sandenburgh, city engineer, Witcher
asked that steps be taken by the city
for immediate enlargement of ex-
isting sewage treatment units.
"We will endeavor to continue op-
eration of the plant with the over-
load, but want to be on record as ad-
vocating expansion," he added.
City Engineer Sandenburgh told
newsmen that there was no imme-
diate danger of a breakdown in the
treatment plant which has been op-
erating at a 25 per cent overload for
the past several years. Plans for ad-
ditions to the plant have been vir-
tually completed, Sandenburgh said;
however,afunds for the work are not
yet available.

VETERAN'S WIFE -- Mrs. Joseph Bassett expresses her approval of
the new University Terrace Apartments in an interview with Eunice
Mintz, Daily staff member.
____,4 *

TERRACE APARTMENTS-Furnished by the University, the two and three bedroom apartments are located
in the area east of University Hospital. Of the twelve which will house a total of 292 veterans and their fami-
lies when completed, four dwelling units have been finished an dare already occupied. Completion of the re-
maining eight units is scheduled for the end of November and occupants will be assigned to apartments as
soon as furnishings are installed.
ii I. *I 4 1* 1

'TU' Scientists
Will Assemble

<>
J

IT'S PRETTY WONDERFUL!
Terrace .Apartments Please Occupants

EXTRA CONCERTS
MAYNOR-
MON., OCT. 28, 8:30
TICKETS: $1.50-$1.00-80c
MESSIAH
SAT., DEC 14, 8:30
Repeat Performance
SUN., DEC. 15, 3:00
Tickets Either Concert
70c-60c-40c
University Musical Society
Charles A.. Sink, President
Burton Memorial Tower

In Rachham
The Association of University of
Michigan Scientists, which since its
organization last January has taken
an active part in political and scien-
tific matters, will hold its first meet-
ing of the year at 8 p.m. Monday in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Prof. Paul K. Stumph, of the epid-
miology department in th School of
Public Health, will be the speaker of
the evening. Prof. Stumph will out-
line the year's plans for the group,
which declares in its constitution the
aim to achieve "the best possible util-
ization of scientific research for the
welfare of mankind."
With a membership composed of
faculty members and graduate stu-
dents in mathematics, physics, chem-
istry and medical sciences, the or-
ganization has held open meetings
since Jan. 14 as part of a plan to ac-
quaint people with the problem of sci-
entific legislation.
Speakers last year were principally
concerned with atomic energy con-
trol measures and the establishment
of the National Research Foundation.
Read and Use the
Classified Directory
QST
RADIO AMATEURS
We have a complete stock
of Supplies and Receivers.
EVERYTHING
I OR THE HAM!
PURCHASE RADIO
AND CAMERA SHOP
605 Church Street

By EUNICE MINTZ
"We think it's pretty wonderful!"
That's the reaction of Mrs. Joseph
Bassett, wife of a University veteran
student, to her new home, an apart-
ment in one of the new units at Uni-
versity Terrace.
"There's no comparison with Wil-
low Village," Mrs. Bassett said. "We
had fun at the Village, but we're glad
to be in Ann Arbor."
Four Units Completed
The Bassetts are among the occu-
pants of the four completed apart-
ment units in the Terrace. The col-
ony is expected to house 292 veterans
and faculty members and their fam-
ilies when all 12 units are open at
the end of November.
Two types of apartments are avail-
able in the units. One type, known as
"o-bedroom," has a kitchenette, liv-
ingroom-bedroom combination and a
bath. The other type, called "one-
bedroom," differs from the first in
that it has a separate bedroom. Other
rooms are the same in both.
Apartments Furnished
The apartments are furnished by

the University and all utilities includ-
ing the furniture are covered in the
rent. The "o-bedroom" apartments
rent for $55.00 a month and the
others for $60.00.
Every apartment is supplied with a
four burner gas stove complete with
oven and broiler, a gas refrigerator,
a kitchenette table with chairs, two
pull-up chairs, a living room couch
convertible into a bed, two end ta-
bles with lamps, an easy chair, a
floor lamp, and a desk and chair. A
round mirror and coffee table are on
the furniture list, but have not ar-
rived yet.
Closet Space
"Our closet space is wonderful,"
Mrs. Bassett remarked. "Everything
so far seems convenient," she said.
The apartments have an abundance
of closet space, including roomy
kitchen cupboards, a built-in book-
case, a built-in chest of drawers, a
broom closet, and a large closet at-
tached to the bedroom. In addition,
a storage crib is provided in the base-
ment for each family.

The furniture in the apartment is
bleached-maple, which blends well
with the buff sand finish of the plas-
ter walls. The living room couches
are upholstered in blue or rose. The
floors are of asphalt tile, which, the
Terrace housewifeill tell you, is
easy to clean. All the apartments
have cross ventilation and an abun-
dance of sunshine.
Other Facilities
In the basement of each apartment
unit washing machines are provided
for the tenants. The spacious halls
are well lighted, and mail boxes are
provided in the lobby of each unit.
The landscaping around University
Terrace is not complete, but the resi-
dents seem satisfied enough with
their apartments not to complain
about the gravel roads and walks.
The Terrace apartments are avail-
able only to full-time veteran stu-
dents who are from Michigan. With-
in that group priority in assignment
is given to veterans with the longest
service record, time spent in V-12,
ASTP or similar units excluded.
Each apartment is leased for only
one year, although a lease may be
renewed for a second year. The sec-
ond year is requisite upon a satisfac-
tory record in the University,
Approximately one-half the apart-
ments are assigned to juniors and
seniors, one-fourth to students in
the professional schools, and one-
fourth to students in graduate school.
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

FOR ONLY $4.50
$2.00 under TIME's $6.50
Livsyuyearly subscription price .i.
$5.90 under TIME'S $10.40
a year newsstand price.,
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A YEAR OF

FOR ONLY $4.25
$
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1.25 under LIFE's $5.50
early subscription price ..
3.55 under LIFE's $7.80
year newsstand price.

Campus Highlights

VETERANS can still get TIME and LIFE at the popular, saving
rates extended to the Armed Forces:
TIME $3.50 A YEAR LIFE $3.50 A YEAR
(good only until Dec. 31, 1946)
FOLLETT'S

Soumynona To Meet . . .
Suomynona, organization for all
women students living in private
homes in Ann Arbor, will hold its first
meeting of the year at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in the League.
* * *
Homecoming Plans . .
Plans for Homecoming will be
made at a meeting of the Pep Club
to be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow in the
Union.
Members are reminded to bring
receipts for purchases made for the
game Saturday.
Musicale Planned ...
Mu Phi Epsilon and Sigma Alpha
Iota, national honorary music socie-

I_ . - I -

M iIII-N

-a -n -a -u nan

1
1
1
'1
1
I
I

"ID RATHER COACH

I
I
1I

ties, will present a joint musicale for
the women of the School of Music
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Auditorium.
Those participating in the program
include Ruth Yanow, pianist; Su-
zanne der Derian, soprano accompan-
ied by Mildred Andrews; Carlynn
Street, mezzo-soprano accompanied
by Lois Forburger; and Margaret
Kaye, violinist accompanied by Do-
lores Di Lorenzo.
Scholarship Meeting
Women from Detroit holding Re-
gents-Alumni Scholarships are re-
quested to attend a meeting at
3:00 p.m. tomorrow in the League.
The room will be posted on the
League bulletin board. Those who
cannot attend are requested to call
Pat Hall at 5663.
Hillel Players ...
Tryouts for the Hillel Players will
be auditioned at 7 p.m. today and at
4:30 p.m. Friday at the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation.
1YESUUyou'll
fallin love with
this unusual craft
and shop tool 0.
BURGESS
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trade Mark Reg U.s Pat 03t,
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woo ... tool leather. Does a host of big
and little craft and shop jobs instantly,
electrically. Operates by vibratio . .. 60
cycles, 110 volts, AC.

ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP

STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY

*
,

THE PROS
A celebrated refugee from college
football tells why he thinks he's better
off - both spiritually and financially -
coaching a pro outfit than he ever was
on the college campus. His name: Jim
Conzelman, fabulous coach of the Chi-
cago Cardinals. His reasons are both en-
lightening and amusing, and he gives'em
to you straight from the shoulder in his
lively article entitled I'd Rather Coach
the Pros in today's issue of The Saturday
Evening Post. Still another reason why,
if you want to keep posted on the world
of sports, you can't afford to miss a
single issue of the Post.

C~o. e
I- s .4
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