100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE

TIlE MiCHIGADN AIL~Y

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1946

S

Nazis Haunted
ByShadow
Of Gallows
Criminals Unable
To Slee rEasily
NUERNBERG, Germany, Oct. 8-
(P) - The long, dreadful nights
known only to those who await the
executioner are telling on Hermann
Goering and Joachim von Ribben-
trop as the time when they will climb
to the gallows approaches.
A prison official disclosed today
that both Goering and von Ribben-
trop were taking sedatives nightly to
make them sleep. For the first time
Goering has broken down and cried.
While Nuernberg's condemned menL
awaited death, three others who es-
caped the rope and were given their
freedom again faced the possibility
that they may land behind bars.
Franz von Papen, Hitler's wily old
liplomat, read today what happened
to Hjalmar Schacht and deciedd to
stay in Nuernberg jail at least ano-
ther night.
Trial for Treason
What he didn't know was that in
Stuttgart the German Council of
States had decided to bring him to
trial for high treason-if the Allied
Control Council will permit restora-
tion of Germany's old treason law.
Back in jail last night a nhour af-
ter he arrived near Stuttgart,
Schacht faced trial by a German
court on charges of being a "leading"
Nazi.
The statet attorney of Wuerttem-
berg -Baden challenged the legality
of Schacht's arrest, however, and
asked for his release until such time
as the former economics minister
may be convicted by a German de-
Naziflcation court.
Radio propagandist Hans Fritzsche
-the third of those acquited by' the
international tribunal - remained
close to the Nuernberg jail pending
a decision on his application to en-
ter the British zone.
Good Appietites
Prison officials disclosed that all
11 have "very good apetites" and
most are maintaining dignity and
discipline.
Goering, however, broke down
once-but only once-and cried
openly when he packed pictures of
his one-time actress wife and daugh-
ter to be sent to them by his attor-
ney.
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
BouIht, Sold, Rented, Repaired
O D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

T-BONES, CANADIAN STYLE-Frank Toy, chef at a roadhouse inn
near Windsor, Ontario, Canada, displays two-inch juicy steaks. Canad-
ian cafes are attracting unusual numbers of Americans who stream
across the border each week-end.
METEOR SHOWING:
Star Studded Show Set for
Ann ArborT Heavens Tonight

Texas stars may be big and bright,
but they have nothing on the ones
scheduled to appear in the Ann Arbor
heavens tonight.
Guest performer in the nightly re--
view will be the Giacobini-Zinner
Comet.
The show is expected to start,
weather permitting, at about 9:30
p.m. (Detroit timei) when the earth
passes within 131,000 " miles of the
comet's path.
The head of the comet zipped past
the earth a week ago yesterday, but
it was 24,000,000 miles away and not
many people noticed it.
The fiery tail will be about half the
distance to the moon. It will be visi-
ble to the naked eye over the eastern
half of the United States and Sanada.
The spectacle is due to last about
three hours but may continue long-
er. If it does, it may be seen from all
parts of North America.
The shower may be even greater,
Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin said, than
one seen in Europe in 1933 when

DOROTHY MAYNOR
I N E X T RA C ON CERT
MONAY, OCT. 28 -8:30

several hundred meteors were visible
each minute.
Astronomers at the Observatory
will probably record the number of
meteors seen and will, of course, be on
hand with all the equipment used
in observing the heavens. Astronomy
laboratory sections will also observe
the display.
Estimates on the appearance of the
Giacobini-Zinner Comet place the in-
tervals between showers at any place
from six and a half to 13 years. The
meteors should be almost directly
overhead early in the evening and will
move northwest across the sky to a
very low position in the north by
dawn.
Council Alters
Driving Rules
Over the protest of Mayor William
E. Brown, Jr., Ann Arbor Common
Council has moved to allow parking
on both sides of South University
from E. University to Washtenaw
Ave. and to install one-hour parking
meters in this area.
Mayor Brown told newsmen today
that he would use his veto power to
overrule the council's decision since
the ruling would cause undue con-
gestion on S. University. No definite
action has been taken as yet, how-
ever.
Council has also adopted a motion
to remove day-long restrictions on
left vehicular turns in the State
Street district. Henceforth left hand
turns at the State St. intersections
of E. William, E. Liberty and S. State
Streets will be prohibited only at the
rush hours of 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.
and 4:45 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. This ac-
tion was taken at the request of mer-
chants in the locality.
Increased Parking Space-
Requested for Convention
A request by the University Exten-
sion Service for reserved parking
space near the Rackham Building to
take care of delegates expected to
attend the Parent Education Insti-
tute here November 5-6-7, was re-
ferred to committee by Ann Arbor
Common Council.

Responsibility
Of Faculty Must
Be Recognized
Adin. Comatends
New Etcraion rend
Special To The Daily
PROVIDENCE, R.I., Oct. 8-The
governing board of a university exer-
cises its highest powers when it rec-
ognizes faculty responsibilities, Pro-
vost James P. Adams of the Univer-
sity of Michigan declared here today.
Provost Adams spoke at the after-
noon session of the meeting of the
Association of Governing Boards of
State Universities and Allied Insti-
tutions, now in progress here.
Universities are administered by a
"joint trusteeship" in which the gov-
erning board, administrative officers
and faculty all share responsibility,
Dr. Adams declared, adding that a
largearea of responsibility has been
delegated to the faculties or has been
acquired by them through tacit con-
sent of the trustees.
"These areas of faculty responsibil-
ity involve," Dr. Adams pointed out,
"the determination of academic ways
and means by which educational pur-
poses are to be achieved and the
guardianship of intellectual integ-
rity."
The recognition of faculty respon-
sibility by boards of trustees, Provost
Adams declared, demonstrates their
faith in "the wisdom of leaving tl
search for truth and its dissemination
in the hands of those who have pro-
fessionally dedicated themselves to
the task."
Provost Adams asserted that the
sense of joint trusteeship is essential
to the achievement of an institution's
highest potential power and influence
as an instrumentality of social good.
AYX LC To Elect
Officers Today
Cost-of-iving Survey,.
lance T.) BePlanned
Election of officers for the present
school year will be the main busi-
ness at the meeting of the University
chapter of the American Veterans
Committee at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Union.
Prior to the election, the results of
the recent get-out-the-vote cam-
paign will be presented. Other mat-
ters to be discussed include the for-
mation of a committee to work on a
cost-of-living survey, an afternoon
dance sponsored by the AVC to be
held in the League ballroom next
Wednesday afternoon from 2 p.m. to
5 p.m. and plans for the organization
of the American Veteran Committee
Associates.
Nominations for the major offices
are as follows: for chairman, Lorne
Cook; vice chairman, Ed Tumin and
Sol Grossman; treasurer, Leon Kel-
ley and Warren Smith; secretary,
Sue La Drierre and Gladys Ham-
mond.
Vets Will Hold
olinations
Nominations for chapter officers
and a discussion of the bonus refer-
endum will highlight the Willow Vil-
lage AVC chapter's meeting at 7:30
p.m. today at West Lodge.
Chairman Al Weaver announced
that the election of officers would be
held the following meeting. Nomina-
tions will be made tonight for chair-
man, vice chairman, secretary, and

treasurer.
Ed Shaffer will present the views in
favor of the bonus referendum ap-
pearing on the ballot in Michigan in
the coming election and Sydney
Samos wil outline the views opposing
the bonus referendum. Both are
members of the Willow Village chap-
ter.

leaders.

LOOK OUT ARMY!,
Students To Bring Faggots,
Rah=Rah Spirit to Pep Rally
The Army game weekend, probably An unusual feature of the rally
the biggest of the year, will get un- be the fire building ceremony fo
derway with the pep rally at Ferry ing the torchlight parade from
Field planned for Friday night. steps of the Union to Ferry Fie]
7:30 p.m. Each student has
asked by the Varsity Comm
sponsor of the rally, to bring a]
of wood to the rally and throw
loses the giant bonfire at the field.
"Michigan's best press agen
Today is the deadline for turning a speaker, Wally Weber, will b
in entries for the Michigan Yell con- hand to fill both the emcee and
test. tured-speaker spots. Weber isc
The contest has been in progress of the 'B' football team and has
for the past few weeks in an effort known to the campus for yea
to provide Michigan with a real one of its favorite emcees.
school yell, as distinguished from Highlight of the evening will 1
cheers which must be led by cheer presentation of the winning y
leaders. The winning yell will be pre- the Michigan Yell Contest. The
sented at the pep rally before the ner will receive as prizes a tript
Army game on Friday night and Ohio State game wtih all exp
prizes will be awarded to its writer. paid, a CA Eversharp pen
Entries may be left at the Union pencil set and credit certif.
desk addressed to the Student Legis- from all campus bookstores am
lature. The judging committee is ing to almost $35.
made up of Walter B. Rea, Assistant In addition, the University M
Dean of Students, Robert Morgan, ing Band and cheerleaders willt
Assistant General Secretary of the hand for the rally before the b:
Alumni Association and the cheer- game of the year to lead the cro

ffmm OWN mum mum mom =on W now Mm WAM on

d
I
I
1
i
1
1
I

Would you.
make a good
football
announcer.
It may sound easy over the air,
but it's really a tough, tiring, nerve-
racking business. You have to spout
as many as 600,000 words in a football
season, and heaven help you if your
tongue slips! In today's Saturday Eve-
ning Post, Pete Martin tells you just
how tricky a job it is; he gives you a
fascinating play-by-play description of
ace sports announcer Byrum Saam in
action. Be sure not to miss this lively
article in the new Post.
He Tlks a Wonderful Touchdown .ti

ly will
llow-
n the
eld at
been
ittee,
piece
it on
t" as
be on
fea-
coach
been
rs as
be the
ell in
win-
to the
penses
and
icates
ount-
arch-
be on
iggest
wd in

Air Reservists
To Get Bonus
Qualified rated or nonr-rated Army
Air' Corps reserve officers a e eligible
to receive a $500 yearly bonus,;Col. V
M. Stilson of I he Reee Officers
Association annomni y eay.
The bonus will be awaidied with no
strings attached to Air Corps Re-
serve officers who meet the Army
qualifications.
Col. Stilson said that vouchers
from 350 Air Corps reservists on cam-
pus have been processed through the
Detroit office since the new ruling
was issued last month.
He asked eligible reservists t.o ad-
dress inquiries to the Adjutant Gen-
eral's office, Washington, D.C., or
to call Capt. Fred J. Arnold, com-
manding officer of the Ann Arbor
Reserve Officer's Association.
t Diamonds
and
0 v StC RINGS
717 North Universiry Ave.
() t} t} O cnc t} .

I

by PETE MARTIN
THE POST WILL PUBIbaSH THE
SELECTED BY THE AMERICAN
FOOTBALL COACHES ASSOCIATION

the parade, cheers and singing.

i

dramatic
black

&, ..
7
.nt .,
'i
SYr;'r' : v
\ .

a e/ ',

STARS

AFTER FIVE

TH
,
,
.
.
r
J 111
j
" ® a.
\\11 l
,Yu
!
:.
,
-,

HE
M OT OR

HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $1.50 - $1.00 -80c
( 20% tax included)

akes your Bike a
Here's dependable, door-to-door
transportation for everyone. A
new Whizzer motor (easily in-
stalled on any balloon-tired bike)
will carry you wherever you want
to go. Whizzer is precision-
engineered, trouble-free! 125 miles
or more per gallon! 5 to 35 miles
per hour! Powerful?-Yes indeed
-takes the hills easily! Open up
new avenues of adventure with
your Whizzer!

Welcome the current return to
elegance in decorative fashions
for the more social hours of the
day ... These smart new styles
in suave and flattering black
are done with the discriminating
good taste you expect at Collins.
Sizes 7-15
Sizes 10-20

Ii

'" s'
s
s
1$
: t

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan