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February 23, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11 L'i .7

4

ormation Committee
r iles Union Position

01 -

'OR'S NOTE: The following
les, the first of a series on the
n, is the official statement of
Board of Directors regarding
stions and complaints" reeiy-
.rom students concerning the
n's services.
By TOM WALSH
-stions and complaints re-
by the student members of
:ard of Directors along with
letters to the editor appear-
The Daily last semester have
ted a widespread misunder-
ng aboiut the Michigan Un-
nong its student members.
correct these current mis-
ptions, the Information
tittee of the Union compiled
ollowing information about
istory, organization, admin-
on, policies, finances, and
aorocarbons
e Discussed

Explains
n, Service

-1-

ealing information previ-
under security regulations
e first time yesterday, Dr.
Fowler, professor of chem-
t John Hopkins University
ned in a lecture here the
-etailed process for the pro-
n of fluorocarbons.
I widely during the war as
iless fluid for the recoil me-
ms of naval artillery, fluor-
'ns saved the lives of many
rs, Dr. Fowler said.
uclear physicist and expert
fo ine chemistry, Dr. Fow-
Lcceeded in developing the
d chemicals after experi-
tion with only a few refer-
as guides.
Fowler was graduated from
niversity of California and
ed his Ph. D. from the uni-
in 1931.
began his research work on
,r fission and fiuorocarbons
after, when he joined the
y of Johns Hopkins Univer-

future plans of the Union to ex-1
plain its actual position.
The Union exists today because
for over forty years individual men,'
both students, faculty, and alumni
members worked to bring it into
being and to foster its growth. To
restore this participation in the,
affairs of the Union by the stu-
dent body, the Board of Directors
will welcome any questions, sug-
gestions or complaints about the
Union from its 13,678 members;
now on campus. The House Com-
mittee will meet from 3 to 5 p.m.
Friday in the Student Offices of
the Union for the specific pur-
pose of contacting students desir-
ing to present ideas about the Un-
ion. After that date, written com-
munitions left in the Student Of-
fices for the Committee will re-
ceive prompt attention and re-
plies.
More than 1,000 men partici-
pated in a mass banquet, Novem-
ber 11, 1904 at which the Uni-
versity of Michigan Union was of-
ficially launched as the social and
recreational center for University
men. A year earlier a student un-
ion to meet the pressing need for
a meeting place for mlen had been
only an idea in the mind of Bob
Parker, a student who was to be-
come the Union's first president.
By 1907, funds raised by student
activities and alumni contribu-
tions were sufficient to purchase
the Judge Cooley home which
stood on the side of the present
structure. Five years later, in
1912, the Union constructed an
addition which we kn'ow today as
the Mimes Theatre to provide a
large meeting room and dance,
hall and to enlarge its dining fa-
cilities.
Two University alumni, the
Pond brothers, drew up the plans
for the Union, the first building of
its kind in the country, and in
June, 1916, President Hutchins
turned the first shovelful of earth
to formally start the construction
of the present building. Delayed
by the first World War, the inte-
rior finishings of the main building
were not completed until 1920 al-
though it functioned as the head-
quarters for many war activities,
even being used as a barracks by;
the Student Army Training Corps.
By 1917 the Union, which then
boasted more than 5,000 life mem-
bers, had cdllected more than one-
third of its million dollar building
costs, chiefly through a nation-
wide drive to raise funds from
alumni members. That same year
the members of the Union volun-
tarily placed their organization
under the control of the Board of.
Regents.
Tomorrow: Who Runs the Union

lider Flight
Wis Praises
Of 'U' Student
A jet plane may be the fastest
transportation between two points,1
but a glider is the most effortless,
according to Lyle Maxey, 48E.
Maxey, an ex-Navy Pilot who
prefers gliding to power flight,
has been a glider pilot since 1937
and has participated in many
meets, including last year's na-
tional contest at Elmira, New
York.
With several other glider pilots
at the University Maxey is form-
ing a glider club open to students
with any previous flying experi-
ence. Although Maxey owns his
own German built glider and is
constructing another, he said that
one of the chief purposes of the
gliding club will be to purchase a
glider "with good performance"
which members can use in meets.
Dick Nelson, 48E, who has also
had experience in gliding, explain-
ed that the club is being formed
to train novices as well as to pro-
vide regular flights for experienc-
ed members of the group.
Gliding, or the "art of flying a
motorless plane in a steady down-
ward flight," not only has been
adopted as a sport, but was used
during the war to deposit men
and equipment behind enemy
lines, Nelson said.
Cbmplete information on glid-
ing and the plans of the club will
be provided at an organizational
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
1042, East Engineering.
Ulir Ski Club
To Give Movie
"Focus on Skis", a movie show-
ing national ski champions in ac-
tion will be presented by Ullr Ski
Club at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The pictures, which were taken
at Alta, Sun Valley, Warm
Springs, Yosemite and other ski
courses, feature Hugh Bauer, Dur-
rance, Prager, Hans Faulkner,
John Fripp and several others in
down hill, jumps, slaloms and
falls. Scenes of the Western
States Championship tournament
are also included.
Tickets for the movie, which is
open to the public, may be pur-
chased at the box'office and at
the Union desk.
'Ensian Tryouts
A meeting for all eligible
students interested in try-
ing out for the editorial
staff bf the Ensan will be
held at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in the Student Publications
Building, Lorelei Nierman,
associate editor, announced
yesterday,

MYDA To Meet . . .
Michigan Youth for Democratic
Action will hold its second meet-
ing of the semester at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Union to elect offic-
ers and discuss plans for the sem-
ester.
Sigma Rho Tan . .
Organization Night will be
held by Sigma Rho Tau, engi-
neering stump speaker's society,
at 7:15 p.m. today in Rms. 19-
25, in the Union.
The training program for
new members will be initiated
at the meeting and members
will be given a chance to choose
the subject matter of the
speeches to be given through-
out the semester, according to
Prof. Robert Brackett, director
of the organization.
Student Recital . . .
Catherine Jean Morgan, stu-
dent in the music school, will be
heard in a violin recital at 8:30
p.m today in Rackham Assembly
Hall.
Miss Morgan, will be accom-
panied by Elaine R. Jacobson, pi-
anist. The program will include
selections by V i t a 1 i, Mozart,
Bruch, Granados, Ravel a n d
Kreisler.
The performance is open to the
public.

Canterbury (lab . . .
Breakfasl will te served at
the Student Center to mtm-
bers of the Canterbury Club
following Holy Communion at
7:15 a.tn. tomorrow.
ref OrItttiEo, Sttdy . ..
The Lutheran Student Associa
tion will meet at 7:30 p.in today
at the center for study of thw
Reformnalion Period iln Cli uw
historiy...
Deutscter V reii . .
The Dcutscher Verein will
meet at 8 p.m. today in Room
318 of the Union.
Dr. J. F. Raschen of the Ger-
man department will give an
illustrated talk on "Goethe and
Weimar."

Campus Hig6hights

Prof. Pierpont
Will Discuss
INav y Finane
"Navy Bati.alion EYpe Iieuc"'
will be the :b jeet oi. a talk by
l'rOf. W ilbu r .I Pie i'pOnt, As ist-
a:t Controllr of the University,'
to be given at 8 p.m. tomorrow in
Rim. :316 in the Union.
'This talk is one of a series be-
ing sponsored by Delta Sigma Pi,
profc:Ssional business administra-
tion fraternity, for the benefit of
all business students. Prof. Pier-
powt will discuss the establishment
of new policies and procedures in
the Navy Department for class-
ifying and controlling navy ex-
penditures.
Prof. Pierpont received his M.
B. A. degree from the University
business administration school in
1938, graduating as high honor
man of his class, and took his
Doctor's degree here in 1942. Soon
after he entered the Navy where
he served with the Bureau of Ord-
nance. After returning to the
University in 1946, he was named
assistant controller.

OW4

ORDURO
Run . . . don't walk
to your favorite varsity shop
for this new, knock-about
4 llelster Corduroy Topper!

Polonia Society ...
SActivities for the semester will
be discussed and approved by Po-
Ionia Society at a meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the International
Center -
The meeting is open to all stu-
dents of Polish descent who are
interested in joining the Society

"
"
"
"
"

Knee length
Swagger
Water resistant
Tartan Plaid lined
Color: Parchment

.1

B usiness Administration,
Class Nominations Open
Nominations for the offices of
president and vice-president of
the Business Administration sen-
ior class are being accepted
through Friday in Rm. 108 Tap-
pan Hall.
Each nomination should be
made on 8% by 11 paper, and
must be signed by 10 members of
the -senior class.

Guild House Tea ...
There will be record-playing,
singing and tea from 4:30 to 6
p.m. today at the Guild House,
438 Maynard for the Congrega-(
tionalists and Disciples students.

t4
QUICK DELIVER)
on
Hamburgers-,9 MilkA...
Phone 2-6606. .. 9 P.M. to 1 AM

y

oft Drinks
Except Sat.

ITwS THE COAT THAT
CAN "TAKE IT!"
CORDUROY
Topper
about $1 7090

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Belmont Garment Company Lechmere Square, Cambridge 41, Mass.

For Real
Dancing Enjoyment
'he Melody Men
Orchestra
hil Savage Evenings 25-8084

a

:41

VPEWRITERS
t, Sold, Rented Repaired
NT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
. D. MORRILL
State St. Phone 7177

(Continued from Page 3)
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
social committee: 4:15 p.m., Tues.,
Feb. 25, at the Foundation. Please
bring eligibility cards.
Christian Science Organization:
7:30 p.m., Upper Room. Lane Hall.
Coming Events
Michigan Chapter AAUP meet
Wed., Feb. 26, 6:15 p.m. for lunch-
eon at the Michigan Union Cafe-
teria. Dr. C. A. Fisher, Director
of the University Extension Serv-
ice, and Mr. E. J. Soop will pre-
sent "Present and Proposed Poli-
cies and Practices of the Univer-
sity Extension Service in Regard
to Services to the State." All
members of the faculty are invit-
ed to this open meeting.
Men's fencing classes: 4:30-5:30
p.m., Wednesday and Thursday
afternoons, Combat room, I. M.
Bldg. Foils and masks will be
furnished.
A tea for the faculty and grad-
uate students of the History De-
partment will be given by t he
Graduat7 History Club on Friday,
Feb. 28, 4 to6 p.m.. West 6on-
ference Room, Rackham Bldg.
English Journal Club: 7:45 p.m.,
Thurs., Feb. 27, West Conference
Room, Rackham Bldg. Mr. Pet-
er Stanlis will discuss "Being and
Meaning in Poetry". Refresh-
ments.
Etta Kappa Nu, Electrical En-
gineering Honor Society: 7:15
p.m., Thurs., Feb. 27, Rm. 247 W.
Engineering. New transfer stu-
dents who are members of HKN
are cordially invited.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional
Business Administration fraterni-
ty: 8 p.m., Wed., Feb. 26, Rm. 316,
Union. Mr. W. K. Pierpont, As-
sistant Controller of the Univer-
sity, will speak on the subject,
"Accounting Experiences." The
public is cordially invited.

The U. of M. Chapter of the Na-
tional Lawyers' Guild: S. Brgoks
Barron, LL.B. '26, Detroit Attor-
ney, will speak on the subject,
"One Man Grand Jury," at 7:30
p.m., Thurs., Feb. 27, Rm. 120
Hutchins Hall. All interested per-
sons are invited.
A. 1. M. E. Dr. Kasimir Fajans,
of hte Chemistry Department, will
give an illustrated talk on the
"Electron Character- of Metals"
before the Michigan Branch of
the American Institute of Mining
and Metallurgical Engineers on
Wed., Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m. Rm. 1042,
E. Engineering Bldg. It is an open
meeting, and those in the Chem-
'itry and Physics Departments are
especially invited to hear Dr. Fa-
jans, well-known for his work inx
this field.
Hiawatha Club, social organiza-
tion for Upper Peninsula stu-
dents: 8 p.m., Wed., Feb. 26, Un-
ion. Election of of ficers for this
term.
A mass meeting protesting Bri-
tish action in Palestine: 3:15-5
p.m., Wed. Feb. 26, Union Ball-,
room. Dr. Frank Littell of the
Student Religious Association will
RIDER'S
Now at 115 West Liberty
I -

be guest speaker. All are invited
to attend.
Delta Epsilon Pi: 8 p.m., Wed.,
St. Nicholas Orthodox Church.
Constitution Revision. S o c i a l
hour.
A HEALTHY HEAD!!
Our 9 hir ndcalardtists in-
vite yourt<osorial queries.No
Waiting.
The Das cla Barbers
Between Michigan and State
Theatres

II

- <=C <0-<>7 a
Diamonds
and
Wedding
Rings
717 North University Ave.
. A.:,a_ ..0_ X

.
" p
1
o '
,

POPULARITY
PROCLAIMED!
It's a known fact the Tom
my pajamas and coats whic
come in proportional length
are favorites with girls a
over the country. See MAR'T
WALKER'S supply now.

*k gl~ceb

A.

Eizath Iil/on S
'Round the Corner on State

N O T I C E
MICHIGAN WOLVERINE
STUDENT COOPERATIVE'
INC.
Important business of , this
organization makes it advisable
to get in touch with All former,
members who are now in. Ann
Ar)bor. If you were a member,
please send your name, address,
and telephone number on a
postcard to S. W. Allen, Seert-
tary, Room 2048 Natural Science
Bulding, Ann Arbor, Michigan
before March 1, 1947.

'N KN ITTI N

That French Angora you've
been looking for can be found
at the VAN AKKEREN KNIT
SHOP. Why not make some
angora head bands, socks,
and mittens to match?

1

6~

Dance Specials

I*"

e must make room for Spring Stock. Here are
oups wearable for Spring and seasons to come -
ony at a fraction of their original prices.

THE WORLD'S GREATEST JAZZ
ARTISTS 1N A TWOV-AND"-HALF
HOUR CONCERT
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tuesday, March 4, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets $1.20 (tax inc.)
On Sale:
Union, League, Record Stores

-DAY

I

ON THEBEAM
... is where you'll be if you
choose a blouse and sweater
from DILLON'S. Take your
pick of the grand assortment
we have to offer.

at 10.00

SERVICE

ETTER WOOL, CREPE, and GABARDINE DRESSES
Dark colors and pastels
Sizes 9-15, 10-42
WOOL 'JACKETS and BLAZERS
AYON LOUNGING PAJAMAS (brunchcoat length).
Sizes 10-18

on

at 5.00

ODDS and ENDS in Dresses of all kinds.
00% wool SKIRTS - Pleated, wrap, and dirndl styles.
Loafer JACKETS - Better SWEATERS
eautiful Wool Jersey BLOUSES - Crepe BLOUSES
DAFER JACKETS - Pullover SWEATERS - Exquis-
e COSTUME JEWELRY - HANDBAGS of Leathers,.
Plastics and Gara-cloth

Your teacher probably told you by now that the
seventh letter in the alphabet is a G and it stands
for
QUALITY PRINTING
(Pronounced GETScraft)

DRY CLEANING'
IF BROUGHT IN TO EITHER OF OUR STORES ON
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS OR WEDNESDAYS.

SURE TO SATISFY
You're bound to find a skirt
to suit your need and taste
at THE MADEMOISELLE
SHOP. We have both dressy
and sporty styles in wools and
crepes and even some with
accordian pleats.

n
' II 111111 : '
=
" .

1I .moy
Q RY SEVG

N,

THE FINISHING,
TOUCH
.. . is a bit of Yardley's fra-
grant cologne. Try "Lotus,"
back on the market for the
first time in several years.
CALKINS - FLETCHER has
the complete Yardley line for
both men and women.

11111

at 2.98 and 3.98

Other grand values in
SWEATERS - FLANNEL SHIRTS

SKIRTS "---

I

I

ffmosm

ii

I

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