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May 04, 1947 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGA4 DAILY

Sr"AT, M9T 4, 1941

. __ _ m. _ _ __

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Dr. Gale Aided by Multilingual Fluency

By BOB WHITE
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 21st
in a series of weekly articles in facul-
ty personalities.
Although born and bred in Mich-
igan, Dr. Esson M. Gale can justi-
Music School
Will Present
Reials Today
Varied concerts and recitals are
planned by the music school to-
day and tomorrow.
Liturgical music, hymns and
spirituals will highlight a carillon
recital to be presented at 3 p.m.
today by Percival Price, Univer-
sity carillonneur.
* * *
The Madrigal Singers, a group
of music school students under the
direction of Prof. Wayne Dunlap,
will present a concert of medieval
and renaissance music at 8:30
p.m. today at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Students participating in the
recital are Maryjane Albright,
Virginia Person, Rose: Derderian,
Carolyn Austin, Arlene Sollen-
berger, Norris Greer, Robert Hol-
land, George Cox, Howard Hat-
ton and Laurence McKenna.
Barbara Lee S m i t h, music
school student, will present a song
recital featuring selections by
Gluck and Ravel at 4:15 p.m. to-
day at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.

.iably be called a "citizen of the
world."
Now scrving as Director of the
. niversity's International Center
,ind as Counselor to foreign stu-
dents, Dr. Gale is able to draw on
his fluency in many languages and
ravel or residence in five of the
even continents "to greet almost
my foreign student in a phrase of
his own language or a word about
his own home town, be it Bagdad,
Hong Kong cr Belem,"
Early Language Training
Dr. Gale was born in Bad Axe
and received his early education in
Bay City. He began his interna-
tional contacts and language
ltraining at the early age of seven
when, although of Scotch-Irish
origin, he was "pitched into a
German parochial school to learn
German by the natural method of
exposure. Before he attended any
school whatever, his father, a
facile linguist himself, had him
reading the Bible in both Latin
and French.
Continuing in variable language
lines, which came to include
Greek, Italian, Anglo-Saxon, Rus-
Class Surveys
Office Systems
Students in a business admin-
istration class in "records organi-
zation" will have access to the fa-
cilities of nine Detroit business
concerns during May.
Two students will be assigned to
each cooperating business, and will
make a weekly visit to that office.
There they will make a survey of
the concern's "paper work sys-
tem," observing the preparation
and use of business records.
All the cooperating concerns are
meihbers of the National Office
Management Association, through
which the arrangement was made.

S * *

*

"Chinese Water Colors," a group
of songs by Carpenter, will be
featured in a song recital to be
presented by Arlene Sollenberger,
music school student, at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow at Rackham Assembly
Hall.____

sian and Esperanto, he majored in
Medieval European History at the
University for his M.A. degree,
with a view to research and teach-
ing in that field.
Foreign Service
Approrpiately enough, with this
preparation, and upon passing the
U. S. Foreign Service examina-
tions, Dr. Gale found himself at
Peking, China, in a completely
medieval atmosphere. There, he
recounts, he found a "gorgeous
Oriental despotism, resembling in
close respects the Byzantine em-
pire in its decline, drawing to a
close within the forbidden city of
Peking. Republican China, with
its American bent, was still in the
offing and intercourse between
Chinese and foreigners was still
at a minimum"
In this exotic atmosphere, the
young man from Michigan was
able to make an intensive sudy of
the Chinese language for practi-
cal use in a long career in the serv-
ice of both the American and Chi-
nese governments. He has subse-
quently written extensively on his
experiences and observations in
the Far East.
Academic Interludes
For"refresher"purposes, his life
in China has varied with occasional
academic interludes in his home-
land where he successively taught
Far Eastern languages and culture
at his Alma Mater, the University
of California and Northwestern
University.
At the outbreak of World War
II, Dr. Gale was appointed by the
State Department to a special mis-
sion in the Far East, maintaining
headquarters at China's wartime
capital, Chungking. On his re-
turn to Ann Arbor, he served a
year as a professor of political
science, and in 1943 assumed his
present duties at the International
Center. At this post, Dr. Gale
says, he has observed "the growth
and fruition of the foreign student
exchange program of the Univer-
sity of Michigan to its present
state of world-wide renown."
Dr. Gale firmly believes that
"international education as prac-
ticed by hundreds of institutions
of higher learning in this country
today will prove in the long run
the most potent factor in bringing
about world understanding and
global peace."
"itel"ectual Differences
"It is definitely intellectual and
ideological differences, that are
causing the world's present ma-
laise," he said.
"With the release of millions of
young American men and women
from war service, international
intellectual exchange is rapidly re-
suming its two-way pattern. The
carrying out of the Fulbright Act
will provide wide opportunities for
young Americans to study in the
foreign lands of their choosing.
"In addition, government agen-
cies are making this definitely the
American era by dispatching
trained young Americans into vari-
ous kinds of foreign service, both
diplomatic and technological," he
said.
Students To Particape
In 'Opinion' Program
Four students will participate at
12:30 p.m. today on the "In Your
Opinion" program, over radio sta-
ion WJR.
They are Richard Roeder, presi-
dent of the Union, Haskell Coplin,
former president of the student
legislature, Bob Wiese of the ath-
letic board, and Paul Harsha, of
The Daily.

Fishing Trip
Tickets To Be
Sold at Unior
Urging devotees of Izaak Wal-
ton to make their reservations
early, the Union Student Offices
emphasized today that the only
chance that fishermen will have
to buy tickets for "Fishing Tackle"
will be Monday from 3 to 5 p.m.
when they will be on sale at the
Travel Booth in the Union.
"Fishing Tackle" will be a trip
limited to Union members which
will take place the weekend of
May 9. The locality chosen isthe
Pere Marquette River near Bald-
win where the students willstay at
a fishing lodge for the two nights.
Tickets for the affair, which
are limited because of available
accommodations, will cost $151
apiece and will cover all expenses
including room, board and trans-
portation. Participants, however,
will have to bring their own equip-
ment.
The group will leave the Union
Friday and will return late Sun-
day.

* CIHIURCIHI NEWS .

Several campus religious groups .McCulloch of the history
will hold meetings and discussions ment.
today. *-,- -

depart-

Prof. James Prendergast of the
architecture school will speak on
"Modern Art" at the meeting of
the UNITARIAN ST UD EN T
GROUP to be held at 6:30 p.m. at
1917 Washtenaw.
"The God of the Humanists"
will be the topic of a sermon to be
delivered by Rev. Edward Red-
man at the Vesper Service at 5:30
p.m.
** *
The LUTHERAN STUDENT AS-
SOCIATION will meet for break-
fast at 8:30 a.m. at the Student
Center, followed by the Bible
Study Class at 9:15.
The evening meeting, which will
be informal, will begin at 3 p.m.
if the weather is good, otherwise at
5:30 p.m.
The CANTERBURY CLUB will
meet for supper at 6 p.m., followed
by a lecture and discussion on
"Humanitarianism in the Anglican
Church," led by Prof. Samuel C.

John Craig, program director
of Lane Hall, will speak on how to
get the most out of summer vaca-
tion at the dinner meeting of
the CONGREGATIONAL - DISCI-
PLES GUILD at 6 p.m. at the Dis-
ciples Church.
The WESLEYAN GUILD will
meet at 6:30 p.m.
At 8 p.m., Kirby Page will speak
on "Making Christianity Work To-
day."
* * *
Supper and a fellowship hour
will follow the talk by Prof. Robert
Angell of the sociology department
on "The Church in Contemporary
Society" at 5 p.m. at the WEST-
MINSTER GUILD house.
The first guests of the Michigan
League in the first year of its
opening in 1928 were the members
of Senior Society who spent the
night there.

Be Sure to Hear
IR
"'THE EXTERMINATORS"
Radio's Lough-Version of "The Killers"
starring
Ann Rutherford as BABY
Jackie Gleason as MUGSI E
Jim Ameche as DILL-FACE
HOLLYWOOD'S OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 6:00 P. M.
Presented by Moray Jewelers
ji - -:

MAY 1

n . .
r*
a4.-.

Contribute to Clothing Drive

AF-REA.L CHANCE FOR YOUR COLLECTION
Excerpts from Famous Speeches
of Two Outstanding Leaders
'FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
and
WINSTON CHURCHILL
Recorded by WOR
the faous New York radio station, while ihcse ienI
delivered their now-famous speeches.
HEAR EXCERPTS FROM ROOSEVELT'S:
* First Inaugural Address
" "Dogger in the Back" speech
" Four Freedoms" speech
" "Prayer for D-Day" speech
HEAR WINSTON CHURCHILL'S:
* "Never in the field of conflict
was so much owed to so few ...-"
0 Hear him in other famous excerpts.
This Memorial Victory Album consists of two, 10", double-
faced records. Simply mail $2.98, assured of a money-back
guarantee if not satisfied, to Michigan's Exclusive Distributor.
The records will be mailed to you direct from New York.
Mail to
THE NORMAN-HALL O.
609 LAWRENCE Siiu I I - ANN Axrice.

WHITE GLOVES

Suede to the eye and touch ... you'll hardly believe these fine pre-shrunk fabric
gloves are actually double-woven cottons that become softer, richer, more lustrous
with each washing. As if this wasn't enough they're distinguished even more
so for the incomparable details usually found only in gloves of the finest leather.

{I

J acobonXL

$4.00

f 1 4

Mot
MRS. ST
/
"I
GILBERTi
Very best an
/;Y

, '

\ :\>~'
>,Z'\ V

Pf7MLMBEP

,ier's Day .

Next Sunday

EVENS FINE CANDIES

Give Mother this
finest of candies, so
fresh, so pure, so de-
liciously different. Two
pounds fancy assortment in
beautiful gift tin for

/
j;
/
', /s
%f/

12.00
pound Gardenia Assortment, $1.00

'Chocolates
d Panama Assortments
175 Dnot i'r

41,% - 6 - W,

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