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April 04, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E SIX

TJILE IGNDAiLY

Now

OPEN TO JUNIORS:
Honors Program Will Offer
Seminars in Liberal Arts

Old 'Lost Art'
Is Kept Alive
In Ann Arbor
Maple Sugar Made

E irollment for
BiologyStation
Placed at 130
Students Will Make
Application April 15

t t

Seminars in politics and ethics,
forms of literature and the devel-
opment of science will be offered
by the College Honors Program in
Liberal Arts in the fall semester,
Prof. John Arthos, of the English
deartment, has announced.
Open to students of junior
Wife of Late
Prof. Spaldi"g
Passes Away
Word was received from be
Angeles yesterday that Effie r
Spalding, widow of the late Prof.
Volney M. Spalding, died March:
29.
Prof. Spalding was appointed a
member of the University botany
department in 1876 and was
chairman of it at the time of his
resignation in 1904.
Mrs. Spalding had been residing
in Los Angeles for 30 years prior
to'her death and had been an as-
sistant professor of botany at the
University of California.
Prof. Spalding in 1881 gave the
first formal instruction in the
United States in forestry at the
University and was active in or-
ganizing the forestry department
in 1903. Following his resignation,
made necessary by poor health, he
continued his studies in Arizona
until the time of his death in 1918.
Mrs. Spalding was 86 at the
time of her death. The body will
be brought to Ann Arbor for
burial.
Hospital Planning
Problems Aired
The special requirements and
details to be considered in the op-
eration of a veterans' hospital pre-
sent difficult problems to the
architect, H. Eldridge Hannaford,
Cincinnati architect, declared yes-
terday at the Conference on Hos-
pital Planning here.
Addressing the 75 hospital di-
rectors, administrators, consult-
ants and architects attending the
first meeting of the three-day
conference, Hannaford compared
the average 38 days hospitaliza-
tion of the veteran to the usual
9 day stay of the civilianes
Consideration must also be given
to the fact that women constitute
only about two per cent of the pa-
tients in a veterans' hospital, he
said.
In thunderstorm clouds, there
mnay be violent vertical air cur-
rents moving sometimes more
than 200 miles per hour.
Bargain
Day
,GREYIHOUND

sanding who have completed their
roup requirements and have at
3ast a B average, the Honors
rogram offers the opportunity to
.udy a subject of wide general in-
grest outside the usual depart-
:ental concentration programs.
"Planned to familiarize students
'ith some of the best expressions
f human thought, the Honors
rogram attempts to provide them
ith a disciplined way of thinking
vhich will be of use in meeting
nodern problems," Prof. Arthos
explained.
eactivated i4 Fall
The Honors Program, initiated
n 1939, was reactivated last fall
ifter a war-time interruption.
Studying politics and ethics, the
present group has concentrated on
he reading of Plato's The Iliad,
The Republic, and The Apology,
Aristophane's Clouds and Aris-
totle's Organon and Politics.
Next year the group will con-
inue with the reading of St. Au-
gustine's City of God, Shakes-
peare's Henry VI, and Hobbe's Le-
viathan. They will also include a
study of Locke's Essay on Human
Understanding, the Federalist, the
American Constitution, P o i n -
,are's Foundations of Science, and
Dewey's Human Nature and Con-
duct, in their program.
Meeting together once a week to
discuss their readings, the students
work in groups of six with a tutor.
Individual conferences with the
tutor are also held.
Critical Papers Assigned
Brief critical papers analyzing
the readings and comparing the
ideas of the various works are as-
signed from time to time. During
the second semester of the senior
year the students write a long es-
say on some subject pertaining to
their earlier study.
With the tutorial study group
constituting one-third of the stu-
dent's program each semester, two
courses are prescribed in addition,
and the remainder is freely elect-
ed.
Students desiring to enter the
Honors Program next fall may ap-
ply to Dean Charles H. Peake or
to Prof. Stanley Dodge.

IF EVER A PUBLIC SERVANT IN WASHTENAW
COUNTY DESERVED PROMOTION
THAT MAN IS

.13y iiogios IBIro)Lhers r---U
Sy FRANK HARMlON IApplications of students or indc-
W yFt th g RMON , pendent investigators for field
without the Bolgys brothers, study or research at the University
Carl and Alton, of Plymouth road, Biological Station near Cheboygan
Ann Arbor, maple sugar produc- during the eight-week summer ses-
tion in Washtenaw County would sion should be made before April
be virtually a lost art. 15. Prof. Alfred H. Stockard, di-
While other farms gradually rector, announced yesterday.
gave up this once common ruralrd
activity-first augury of spring-_ Graduate students or under-
Carl and Alton kept at the job graduates with one year of bio-
continuously, and are now round- logical science are eligible to ap-
ing out their 35th year of heed- ply. Since enrollment is limited
ing the call "sap's running!" in to 130, Prof. Stockard urges every-
their 35 acres of "sugarbush" one interested to submit applica-
Quite a Job tions at once. Those not previ-
Gathering and boiling sugar ously enrolled at the Station must
maple sap is "quite a job," they submit official transcripts and let-
admitted, but said their many ters of recommendation from two
years' experience and the good de- professors. Graduate students must
mand for the syrup make it worth r be enrolled in the graduate school.
while, though help has been hard Comfortable living quarters are
to get in recent years. Tapping available for 55 single men, 50 sin-
starts the last of February and gle women and 25 married couple,,
usually continues for five or six Prof. Stockard said.
weeks, but this year the brothers
are still at it because the linger- 1*
ing period of cold nights and O } [I[tCZ2l
warm days encourages good runs
of sap in the trees. , U
The sap is boiled down to syrup GiVe Lectur U

.

f

in a "sugarhouse" by a shallow
heated evaporator 14 feet long by!
four feet wide which is fed from a
large storage tank. Pails of sap
from each tree are emptied into
a wagon tank which takes the
liquid to the sugarhouse.
70 Gallons a Day
Yesterday, a "fairly good day,"
the Bolgos brothers gathered 70
barrels, which will boil down to
70 gallons of the rich amber syrup
so many Americans love to pour
over their pancakes or waffles at
breakfast.
Lest anyone be tempted to
rush over to the Bolgos farm for
some of the syrup, Carl pointed out
that their milk route patrons take
"all we can make."
The highest navigable lake in
the world is Lake Titicaca, on the
border between Peru and Bolivia.
It is two and a half miles above
sea level, 139 miles long and its
depth varies from 100 to 1,000
feet.

Roberto Rodriguez, architecture
student from Colombia, will dis-
cuss "Colombia" at 8 p.m. Mon-
day, April 14 in Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Rodriguez, who attended the
National University in Colombia
for three years before coming here,
said yesterday that class differ-
ences are less striking here than in
Latin American countries.
Latin American students show
less interest in athletics, he said,I
remarking on their lack of "col-
lege atmosphere."
The lecture, which will be open
to the public, is the third in a
series sponsored by Phi Iota Alpha,
Latin American fraternity, and
the International Center. It will
be accompanied by films.
Cumulo-nimbus clouds which
figure in thunderstorms have a
spreading anvil-like top which
may reach as high as 25,000 feet.

JUDGE JAY H. PAYNE

1
i
1

Non-pac

rtisan candidate for

i.

c%/ y

q4rW4

CIRCUIT JUDGE
Judge Payne's record throughout seventeen years judicial service in Washtenaw
County is absolute proof that he possesses in an unusual degree the three essential
qualities of a good judge-
PERSONAL INTEGRITY -JUDICIAL TEMPERAMENT-
ADEQUATE LEGAL TRAINING
A graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, he holds the degree of
Juris Doctor as evidence of his superior preparation in law.
Fortified with several years of successful experience as a practicing attorney, Jay
H. Payne has spent the\major part of his adult life in our judicial service. As
Municipal Judge in Ann Arbor he has done an outstanding job, always enforcing
the law strictly and fearlessly but ever dispensing justice humanely and impartially,
with equality to all, and without regard to the color, creed, politics or social position
of the persons appearing before him.
"To do the best judicial work, or even to learn the best methods for
doing it, years of research and experience are required. Many judges do
good work from the beginning of their service, but as in other work, all
can learn to do better work in the hard school of experience.
The policy of advancement from a position of lesser responsibility to one
of greater, such as prevails throughout industry and other fields of
human activities, should apply to our judiciary."
-Taken in part from the journal of the Aaterican Judicale Society
,JUDGE PAYNE HAS HAD M ANY Y EA RS OF JU)DICIAL EXPERIENCE---

'4

I

You'll look like a Breath of Spring

A

in NAVY

...
m
\.
-
f - * \,
} .
i' . w

I

II I

I

OR PASTEL

WASHTENAW

COUNTY

HAS HAD MANY

YEARS

IN WHICH TO

OBSERVE THE QUALITY OF HIS JUDICIAL WORK--HE HAS PROVEN

HIMSELF

TO BE A GOOD

JUDGE--HE

WILL BE AN EXCELLENT

CIRCUIT JUDGE---HE IS LOGICALLY THE ONLY MAN IN LINE --- HE
HAS EARNED AND DESERVES PROMOTION.
VOTE FOR
JUDGE JAY H. PAYNE for CIRCUIT JUDGE
NEXT MONDAY, APRIL 7

Eviry Day is bargain day at your
Greyhound Terminal. Greyhound
offers bargains in travel whenever
or wherever you go on business or
pleasure. You'll pleasantly discover
Greyhound gives you more miles
per travel dollar, more comfort per
mile, more time saviig schedules
per day. Whatever your travel
needs, choose Greyhound and save.
You will always

A Personal Statement from
Judge Jay H, Payne,
As my campaign fot promotion to the Circuit Court comes to a close, may I
express my sincere thanks and appreciation to the many fine people of Washtenaw
County who have assisted me on a voluntary and purely non-partisan, non-political basis.
I have not sought the active help of any clique or group, nor of lawyers, law
enforcing agencies and others having daily business with the courts;
Since I have insisted that every cent spent in the campaign come from my own
personal funds, I have been unable to employ highly paid campaign personnel or use
other expensive campaign method
The tireless work which has been done for me by many, will ever remain in my mind
and heart as proof that no man can have greater wealth than friends who are true.
Thank you sincerely from the bottom of my heart.
JAY H. PAYNE.

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