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March 30, 1947 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-30

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TI MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNRAY, MARCH 30, 1947

.. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .. ... . ..... . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Humphreys To Seek Milder Climiate

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 19th very Tuesday through the exten-
in a series of weekly articles on facul- eeyTedytruhteetn
ty personalities. lion service in Grand Rapids.
Although Prof. Humphreys is
By FRED SCHOTT ,perhaps best known to students for
This is Prof. W. R. Humphreys' ----
last semester at the University

but he doesn't plan to stop teach-
ing.
"I would like to teach in some:
milder climate during the winter,
and then spend my summers in
Ann Arbor," he said,j
Prof. Humphreys teaches the
English Bible course that we've all
heard about. He is the only man
who has given it here.
A Harvard graduate, Prof.,
Humphreys taught at the Univer-
sity of Oklahoma before joining
the University's English depart-,
ment. In 1921 he became the first
assistant dean of the literary col-
lege, a post he held until 1938.
Still Busy
Officially Prof. Humphreys is
now on his retirement furlough.
However, he is completing the
year's work in the English Bible
and his work with an English hon-
ors student. He also teaches
courses in the Bible and Milton

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W. R. HIUMPIIRsEYS

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DRESS UP
THIS EASTER!
Don't be caught shcvt
this Easter without
your three quarter

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the Bible course, he has supple-
mented it with the English novel.
Milton and courses in introduct-
ory poetry. At the University of
Oklahoma he gave almost every
course in the department. lie said.
"Don't call me a jack-of-all-
trades. Teaching all those courses
did me good, but I think it might
have been hard on the students."'
It was at the University of Ok-
lahoma that V. L. Parrington
Pulitizer Prize winner, suggested
that Prof. Humphreys teach the
English Bible.
Well Preserved
Prof. Humphreys said he was
once interviewed by a reporter who
called him "well-preserved." And
he remembered that he was once
taken for a student shortly after
he came here from Oklahoma.
"I was going to Detroit on the
inter-urban and somebody asked
me-don't you have to be in?"
Prof. Humphreys likes travel
and hopes to go to Europe "when
the world settles down." He had a
leave trip planned during 1943
through the Mediterranean, the
Holy Land and Europe but the war
interfered.
Steady Golfer
Both the Humphreys like golf
and play the University course.
"He plays a steady game," Mrs.
Humphreys said. "He has a great
deal of patience with it."
The Humphreys have two sons,
one a graduate of the University.
Glee Club Will
Give Concert
The University Women's Glee
Club under the direction of Prof.
Marguerite V. Hood will present
a musical program at 8 p.m. today
in the Union Ballroom.
Presented as one in the Inter-
national Center's Sunday evening
series, the program will include
selections by Brahms, Bizet, Grif-
fes, Rachmaninoff, Schuman and
Herbert.
Soloists of the evening will be
Lennis Britton and Bonnie Elms.
Lois Forburger will accompany the
Glee Club.
Supper will be served to foreign
students and friends before the
concertC at7rp.m. in the Interna-
tional Center.
APA Conference
Plans for a full meeting of the
American Psychological Associa-
tion will be discussed here today
by eleven officers of th? a sca-
tion, including president - elect
Prof. Donald G. Marquis, chair-
man of the psychology depart-
ment.
Pharmacy Talk
Don KF rancke, chief pharma -
cist of University Hospital, will
discuss "The Modern Hospital
Pharmacy" tomorrow on "The
Doctors Talk It Over," an Aneri-
can Broadcasting Company pro-
gram.

CHILD MARRIAGE-Dorothy Adams (left), 16, and Theodore
Lee (right) 10, were married at San Diego, Calif., in a "Gypsy"
ceremony. Deputy District Attorney Richard Vaughn said the
boy's parents were charged with contributing to the delinquency of
a minor.
GLOBAL CAMPUS:
USAFI Escapes Ax as Vets,
Servicemen Continue Studies

Angell To Talk'
To Federalists
O1 UN, World
UNESCO Activities
Will Be Discussed
Prof. Robert C. Angell, chair-1
man of the sociology depart-
ment will speak on the subject,,
"From United Nations to World
Government," at the first meet-
ing of the newly-formed campus
chapter of Student Federalists,
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Rm. 304 of
the Union.
Just returned from a meeting of
the United Nations Educational,
Scientific, and Cultural Organiza-
tion in Philadelphia, Prof. Angell
will discuss some of the activities
and functions of this group,
through which he believes much
of the work towards world govern-
ment must be directed.
The Student Federalist meet-
ing will be open to all those stu-
dents who are interested in the
group, and George Shepherd, pres-
ident of S.F., extends an invita-
tion to the student body to come
to the meeting and join the or-
ganization.
Shepherd will deliver a short
talk on the history, structure and
purpose of Student Federalists,
and will describe the recent con-
ference in Asheville, N.C., in which
five national world government
groups merged into one organiza-
tion, United World Federalists.
Elections to fill the remaining
positions on the Executive Council
will be held, and appointments
of chairmen to the standing com-
mittees announced. Future plans
including lectures, forums, study
groups, and public opinion polls
on world government will also be
discussed.
Dean Lloyd at Meeting
Alice C. Lloyd, Dean of Women,
is participating in the first nation-
al meeting since 1942 of the Na-
tional Association of Deans of
Women, being held this weekend
in Columbus, Ohio.
Diamonds
and
Wedding
^ ' IwRings
717 North University Ave. c

The Canterbury Club, the Con-
gregational-Disciples Guild and
the Wesleyan Guild have each,
pledged $160 for the purchase of
a heifer for the "Heifers for Eur-
ope" drive which is being conduct-
ed on campus by the University
Famine Committee.
League House presidents have
also said that they will try to col-
lect enough money from their
houses to buy a heifer.
The campus drive is part of a
national movement sponsored by
the Brethren Service Committee
to purchase heifers to send to
needy European farmers. The ani-
mals are inoculated, then govern-
ment inspected and shipped to
Europe through a reputable reliefF

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HEIFER PROGRAM:
Three Groups Pledge Funds
To Famine Committee Drive

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length short topper .. .
flair backs, with and
without turned up cuffs
... 100% wool. Black,
whitewine, royal, pink,
brown, and white.
Sizes 9-15.

agency. They are delivered to the
farmers personally by a field re-
presentative of the national or-
ganization.
Because milk is one of the best
sources of badly needed protein,
this project can give nourishment
and hope for the future to thou-
sands of hungry, discouraged peo-
ple, Seymour S. Goldstein, presi-
dent of the Famine Committee,
said. It also gives farmers the
opportunity to re-stock their
farms, he added.
Campus organizations which
have not yet contributed to the
drive may send their donations to
the Famine Committee at Lane

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$25

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MADISON, Wis., March 29-P,
-A war-born baby that thrived
on bombs, shells and flame to be- 1
come the world's largest educa-c
tional institution with a campust
that girdles the globe will reach itsf
fifth birthday in April with pros-
pects ofcontinued growth in ar,
area as large as Uncle Sam caresd
to make it.
Thousands of ex-servicemen ana
women are taking advantage ofs
Wiartil e facilities to continue their
studie, and many more - ones
out of every seven - still in ser-t
vice are hitting their studies with
more vigor than ever because they
have more study time.
The United States Armed Forces
Institute, with world headquarters
here, escaped the ax which ended
other emergency projects.
The G1 "foxhole university,"
Uncle Sam has announced, will
continue as part of the regular
peacetime military establishment,.
More than 1,500,000 enrollmentsk
have been processed by USAFIC
since April 1942. Some 800,000 areI
still on an active status. New ap-t
plications total 10,000 monthl i
Courses have been trimmed and
adjusted to meet economy sand
peacetime needs, but students con-
Sine to bombard headquarters
with some 200,000 pieces of mail1
each week. The mail comes from
domestic posts and bases and from1
foreign lands where the U.S. mili-
tary is still busy. More than 200

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persons handle the chores in con-
nection with the courses, text-
books, educational material, tests,
charts and completed lessons that
travel between the school and its
far-flung students.
USAFI does not issue credits,
diplomas or degrees but gives cer-
tificates attesting that the student
has completed certain courses.
Seventy-two colleges and univer-
sities recognize USAFrs offerings
--250 correspondence courses,.90
self-teaching courses and more
than 6,000 university courses ar-
ranged through the 72 cooperating
schools,
Palm Sunday
Services Held
(Continued from Page 1)
_ -- _ _ _ . - - - - - - - --- - - ~
by the UNITARIAN STUDENT
GROUP at 6:30 p.m. today at the
Unitarian Church, 1917 Wash-
tenaw.
The topic of the sermon at the
service at 5:30 p.m, will be "What
About Immortality?"
Rev. Fr. Tom, Collins, of St.
Bridgits Cimrch, Detroit, will
speak to the memnbers of the NEW-
MAN CLUB on "Liturgy of the
Oriental Rite of the Roman Cath-
olic Church" at 7:30 p.m. in the
club rooms of St. Mary's Chapel.
Father Collins, who has done
research work in the field of Cath-
olic liturgy with emphasis on the
Greek Rite, will bring a group of
twenty to demonstrate the chants
of the Oriental Rite. The talk will
be followed by a social hour.

A REAL CHANCE FOR YOUR COLLECTION
Excerpts from Famous Speeches
of Two Outstanding Leaders
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
and
WINSTON CHURCHILL
Recorded by WOR
the famous New York radio station, while these men
delivered their now-famous speeches.
HEAR EXCERPTS FROM ROOSEVELT'S:
" First Inaugural Address
" "Dagger in the Back" speech
" Four Freedoms" speech
" "Prayer for D-Day" speech
HEAR WINSTON CHURCHILL'S:
0 "Never in the field of conflict
was so much owed to so few ...
9 Hear him in other famous excerpts.
This Memorial Victory Album consists of two, 10", double-
faced records. Simply mail $2.98, assured of a money-back
guarantee if not satisfied, to Michigan's Exclusive Distributor.
The records will be mailed to you direct from New York.
Mail to
THE NORMAN-HALL CO.
609 LAWRENCE STREET - ANN ARBOR

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Joseph Ralston Haydon Memorial Library Committee
presents
"MANILA SQUARE"
featuring
TIM DOOLITTLE AND HIS BAND

~rill ,Fd4'ch !enice
QUICK DELIVERY
Hamburgers ... Milkw... Soft Drinks
Poc2-6606- - - 9 P.M. to 1 A.M.

Saturday, April 19
Waterman Gym - 9-12 P.M.

Semi-Coed Bid
Tickets $2.00

11

i - --- _ ---_-. _s_- '

Important Works

Il

opf

Modern

Li'*terature --

Just Out
for Easter
That's the blouse you
want, isn't it! Well
then, snatch at this
lovely beauty with
push-up sleeves.

We Offer You a Collection of Experimental
and Avant-Garde Writings by the

Season your Easter wardrobe
with a little sugar, a dash of
spice . . . meaning our new
Spring accessories, of course!
Select our pert shorty gloves,
smart jewelry, handsome hand-
bags, and lovely hankies to per-
sonalize your new outfit.

HENRY MILLER
Cosmological Eye
Sunday after the War
Air Conditioned
The Colossus of Maroussi
NEW DIRECTIONS
(The New Classic Series)
JAMES: Spoils of Poynton
WEST: Lonely Hearts
ALAIN: Fournier The Wanderer
FORSTEIR: A Room with a View
RIMBAUD: A Season in Hell
PATCHEN: Selected Poems

Great Modern Writer
EVELYN WAUGH
Vile Bodies
Decline and Fall
Handful of Dust
Put Out More Flags
When the Going Was Good
Brideshead Revisited
VIKING Portable Library
James Joyce
Ernest Hemingway
D. H. Lawrence
Oscar Wilde
Thomas Wolfe
F. Scott Fitzgerald
William Faulkner

ARTHUR KOESTLER
Darkness at Noon
Thieves in the Night
Arrival and Departure
Yogi and Commissar
KAFKA
Kafka: A Problem
Miscellany
Metamorphosis
The Trial
The Castle
Great Wall of China

Th

1PHILIP WYLIE: Generation of Vipers and An Essay on Morals
STEPHAN HERO: Cross Sections of 1947

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