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March 23, 1947 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MTCH1CAN 0I~ALY

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
McClusky Uses Informality,
Suggestion To Alert Students

fly EUNICE MINTZ
(Editor's note: This is the 18th iila
series of weekly articls on n faclty
personalities.),
Prof. Howard Y. McClusky lists
two reasons for choosing educa-
tional psychology and adult edu-
cation as his field.
His greatest interest'is people,
and he sort of "drifted into the
field as my whole family-moth-
er, father, brother, brother-in-law,
and uncle-all taught."
A graduate of Park College,
Prof. McClusky took his PhD at
the University of Chicago. Unlike
most people, he went from a bach-
elor's degree to a doctorate, and
sidetracked an M.A. He came
to the University in 1924.
Prof. McCluskey says he is oc-
casionally "kidded" about the way
he conducts his classes. Foregoing
any tendencies toward the austere
professor type, Prof. McClusky
makes it a practice to welcome
latecomers at the door with such
greetings as "we're so glad to have
you join us" or "do come in." Con-
tinual absentees who finally show
up for class are often told that a
memorial service complete with
wreath for their chair had been
planned.
If a student continually cuts,
Prof. McClusky asks other mem-
bers of the class to "remember
me to him" when they bump into
him on campus.
Another trick of Prof. McClus-
ky's involves the psychological
process known as "suggestion". A
ficticious name such as "Percival
Winklebottom" is added to the
roll. Percival epitomizes the way-
ward student, the student who al-

ways meant to come to class but
aever quite got t h e r e, andi
the student who has a long
list of alibis for his misdeeds.
"Percival never arrives," Prof. Mc-
Clusky said. "But he comes in
handy."
Prof. McClusky does a lot of
community work in connection
with adult education. He says his
professional interests have "two
foci-mental hygiene of adolescence
and the problem of community
::elf help," the latter a part of
adult education.
Worked for Youth
He served as associate director
of. the American Youth Commis-
sion in Washington during 1940-
41, and worked with the Commis-
sion after his return in the fall
of '41 by shuttling between Ann
Arbor and Washington.
The MeClusky's have three
children, aged five, eight and 12.
re .
(continued from Page 1)
member of General MacArthur's
staff.
Rooks Scarce in Philippines
The drive to create a badly
needed library at the Philippine
university is particularly appropri-
ate at this time, according to Prof.
Robert Hall of the geography de-
partment, who heads the nation-
wide drive. University of the
Philippines' educational facilities
were almost completely destroyed
in the liberation battle for the is-
lands.

Concert lBaud
Will Present
Hill Program
New Music Will Be
Played Wednesday
The Michigan Concert Band
will present a program of new
compositions and arrangements
at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in Hill
Auditorium.
George Cavender, publicity
manager, pointed out yesterday
that members of the University
bands have unusual opportunities
to play new music.
New Arrangement
He cited as an example the fact
that the group will be the first
university band to play a new
Vernon Malone arrangement of
the first movement of Cesar
Frank's "Symphopy in D Minor."
Malone is conductor of public
school and municipal bands in
Virginia, Minn.
"It has not been customary for
bands to perform such large works
as symphonies or even move-
ments from them," Cavender said,
"but with the' advent of men like
Malone and the development of
the concert band to a high degree
of proficiency, they are now at-
tempting it." Another new ar-
rangement by Malone of the
Third Movement, "Grape Festi-
val," of Gallois' "Italian Sketches"
will be included in the program.
Wagner Selections
Russell Howland, wind instru-
ment instructor in music school,
has transcribed for the band se-
lections from "Parsifal" by Wag-
ner. Howland is a nationally-
known authority on reed instru-
ments and has done several similar
transcriptions, Cavender said. De
Falla's "Ritual Fire Dance" has
been arranged by George Roach,
former student and alumnus of the
University bands. A former busi-
ness manager of the band, Don
Chown, who now heads the script
writers department for WJR, has
made an arrangement of "Huckle-
berry Finn" by Ferde Groff.
French Film

STAGE COACH ERA:
Historical Group Givet Lette-rs
Of First Republican Governor

Most people like to read other
people's mail.
On this premise, the Michigan

srf aeguish."
A recruiititl. off

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icer u~Sq

Faielty To Attend Conferences

Historical collection in the Rack- Illinois, gives a fu
ham Building has recently inher- news Cyc vent . A ft
for a paragraph tl
ited some prize reading: several "as dull as a squ
letters written from the 1850's cruits," he admits
through the Civil War to Michi- ",some excitement"
gan's first Republican governor, when the bursting
Kinsley S. Bingham. distillery kilkld tw
The letters, donated by Bing- two, tore a whole
ham's great niece, Miss Emilie fragments and "did
Comstock of Constantine, add to age to the whiskey
a growing collection of the papers -- - --
of a colorful political figure. ---
K. S. Bingham, Livingston
County farmer, was a Free-Soil
Democrat before he joined the
newly-formed Republican party
in 1854. Landsliding into office
in that year, he served as gover-
nor from 1855 to 1859 and was
later a member of the United T
States senate.
The correspondence of Bing-
ham and his immediate family is
a casual synopsis of how people
lived 90 years ago. Mixed with
weather commentaries, personal
health surveys and data on the
birth, growth and talkability of
babies are some interesting ac-
counts of Civil War strategy.
homey comments on life in gen-
eral, a few good yarns and even
some poetry.
Many letters mention church-
going, and most are written with
an eye to stern realities. Hardly a
letter fails to mention death or a
funeral. One condoling letter 336 S
goes: "The hand of death Yeas
snatched those twin buds of p:'om-
ise so rudely that your heart- -

l'inl xxith~ al-|
ficer in e1''u'ria,
m11y twist o a
er co mplaining
hat things were
aad of raw re-
there has been
the day before.
of a boiler in a
0 men, wounded
e building into
a deal of dam-I

For O peretta Faculty members in the fields
of chemistry, geology, and edu-
Students interested in singing cation will attend conferences in
in the Gilbert and Sullivan oper- Ios Angeles, Chicago, and six
etta "Trial by Jury" may report southern cities this week.
to the eguhlr meeting of the Gil- Prof. K. K. Landes of the geol-
bert and Sullivan Operetta Club, ogy department and Prof. L. B.
at 7 p.m. tomorrow in the Union. Kellum, director of the museum of
MEmbe'rshi p in the club is open paleontology, will attend the an-
to students in any school or de- nual meeting of the American As-
partment of the University, ac- sociation of Petroleum Geologists
coraing to James Uberhorst, presi- tomorrow in Los Angeles.
dent of the club. The group was Prof. Hobart H. Willard of the
formed for the benefit of students chemistry department will discuss
interested in singing and acting, improvements in precipitation
though not necessarily connected processes on an American Chemi-
with the school of music or the cal Society tour to six southern
speech department, Uberhorst cities beginning Thursday.
said. Dean J. B. Edmonson, Dr. Ed-

gar Johnston, Dr. Harlan C. Koch,
and Dr. John M. Trytten of the
education school, and Dr. George
Carrothers, director of the Bureau
of Cooperation with Educational
Institutions, will attend the an-
nual meeting of the North Cen-
tral Association of -Colleges and
Secondary Schools in Chicago to-
morrow through Friday.
Dean Edmonson will preside ov-
er a conference of the deans of
schools of education from state
universities in the North Central
territory Monday and Tuesday.
He will also address a meeting of
the Association of Private Schools
of the North Central states on
Friday.

.I

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- ------ - - - -------- ------ ---- ----

NOW IN STOCK!

HE AVERY HOPWOOD AWARD WINNERS

Josephine Eckert: THE PRACTICING OF CHRISTOPHER
R'ussell La )e : NO MORE WITH ME . .
Jeane/te Michael !1aien: RIP VAN WINKLE'S DREAM . .

. . $2.75
$2.50

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LAIER

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MADE
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Beautiful as any lips in Hollywood.
No brush needed for clear, clean lip
AS ADVERTISED
IN VOGUE lines. Cases guaranteed for life. In gift
boxes. Price includes two extra, quick
change, refills (A year's supply).
GOLD PLATED $# J0
PLUS TAX
SILVER PLATED $5.00
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Company
The Dependable Stores

To Be Shown
"The Well-Digger's Daughter,"
first-run French film with Eng-
lish titles, will be presented at
8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at
Hill Auditorium under the aus-
pices of the campus AVC and the
Art Cinema League.
The picture was written, pro-
duced and directed by Marcel
Pagnol, author and producer of
such films as "Topaze" and "The'
Baker's Wife," which was shown
here recently.
Tickets will go on sale starting
at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the box of-
fice in Hill Auditorium. All seats
are unreserved.
Sanders Receives
Chemistry Award
Recipient for the collegiate year
1§46-47 of the annual award giv-
en by Alpha Chi Sigma, profes-
sional chemistry fraternity, to the
graduating chemist or chemical
engineer having the highest schol-
astic average is Carl William San-
ders, chemical engineering ma-
jor.

"What could
the Red Cross
do for you?2"

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(Just

find yourself-or your family-in

the pictures below

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ARE YOU A VETERAN
WITH A PROBLEM?
You can get help with anything
from stubborn personal troubles
to your benefit claims!
The Red Cross helped more than
1,100,000'veterans last year, through
home service workers in chapters.

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324 South State

818 South State

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Pan Pipes A Sping Song
In Our College Seetion
SPRING DRESSES

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WILL YOUR CHILD GO
SWIMMING THIS SUMMER?
The Red Cross may save her life!
Throughout the nation, the Red Cross gives
training in swimming and water safety.
The drowning rate in the U. S. has been
cut in half since this program was begun.
WILL YOU BE IN AN
AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT?
Even the most careful driver
can't be sure4
There are 12,000 Red Cross
highway first-oid stations and
mobile units operating in your
interest.

DO YOU LIVE IN
ONE OF THESE AREAS?
Every one had a serious disaster
last year!
Your Red Cross saves lives, supplies
emergency food and medicine, even
restores homes according to need.

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HAVE YOU A BOY (OR GIRL)
IN THE ARMED FORCES?
Today-tomorrow-any day
may bring a real need for the
services of a Red Cross field
director, recreation or hos-
pital worker!
At home and abroad, the essen-
tial wartime activities of the
Red Cross for the armed forces
are a continuing responsibility.
GOING TO HAVE A BABY?
You'll be a better mother after
IRed Cross training!
Classes in nutrition, mother and
baby care, and family health, are
available in hundreds of Red Cross
y,-7chapters.

WILL ILLNESS
INVADE YOUR HOME?

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to take you from class
to important functions
Sleek draped crepes and jerseys for
festive clays
erisp spun rayons and butcher
linens for class . . .
as well as a variety of unusual cottons
that you'll want to buy right now
for Summer.
* $ s3 en

No family is immune!
G. Red Cross training in home nursing
is a protection to the home and the
community. Altogether 2,710,980 In-
dividuals have received Red Cross
Home Nursina certificates.
Don't you see? How easily it may be you
who will need the Red Cross? See-how much
-how very much-it means to your country,
to your community, to you yourself to have
this great organization ready and able to
answer the next cry for help? See-why you
should give now-give all you can-
to the American Red Cross?
so your

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Now

100% WOOL SUITS to wear all Spring!

GIVE

Hard surface worsteds and gabardines that take
every day classroom wear and tear in their stride

x -

BE=

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