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March 18, 1947 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-18

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FIJIE MICHIGAN DAILY

°' '.I 1T8 M IC :I l1f Ai DA ..

LOWERED STANDARDS:
Hungarian Banker Tells Cost
Of Halt on Currency Inflation

Only at the expense of the liv-
ing standards of its people, has
Hungary successfully halted the
wildest currency inflation in his-
tory, Paul Hollas, director of the
Hungarian Commercial Bank, said
yesterday.
In a lecture sponsored by the
School of Business Administra-
tion, Hollos explained that after
making more progress than any
Hostel Group
Plans Spring
Vacation Trips
Two spring vacation trips in
April and an overnight' trip in
March have been scheduled by the
Ann Arbor Council of American
Youth Hostels.
A bike and train trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., at an approximate
cost of $50 has been planned for
April 4-11. The group will tra-
vel by overnight train to Harper's
Ferry, West Virginia. Here they
will start the bicycle part of their
journey, through Virginia and
Maryland.
EMn route they will visit John
Brown's Fort at Harper's Ferry,
see the White House, the Capitol
and the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington.
On the return trip from Wash-
ington to Detroit, they will bicycle
north from the capital through
the farm areas of northern Mary-
land to Gettysburg, Pa., and on
through the foothills of the Blue
Ridge Mts. to Harper's Ferry for
the return train trip to Ann Ar-
bor.
A shorter bike trip through the
Hocking Valley section of Ohio is
slated for April 4-7.
An overnight trip to the Saline
Valley Farms Youth Hostel on
March 29-30 is being planned in
co-operation with hostelers from
Detroit, with a- special benefit
square dance on Saturday night.
Taggart To Speak
Herbert F. Taggart, Assistant
Dean of the School of Business
Administration and Professor of
Accounting, will leave today for
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to address
the Cedar Rapids chapter of the
National Association of Cost Ac-
countants on the subject of "Re-
cent Developments in Cost Ac-
counting."

other central European country,
gungary estimates that its in-
ustry will be at 75 per cent of
the 1938 level by next summer.
Equipment Intact
"We have been able to do this
because much of our industrial
plants and equipment were left in-
tact. Germany removed some in-
*ustrial facilities and most of
what she took is now in the Amer-
ican zone. The United States has
pledged its return. Russia like-
Nise removed some equipment but
not a great deal in proportion to
the total possessed by Hungary."
The inflation was halted by sta-
bilization of a new currency and
government repudiation of !the
old, Hollas explained. Within a
few months, value of the currency
in circulation in the country drop-
ped from 150 million dollars to
$200,000, the banker said. When
the governmentbegan redeeming
the old currency with t'nenew,
stores of gold and foreign notes to
the amount of 10 million turned
up, he said.
Wages, Prices Kept Low
"Although the currency has now
been stabilized, wages and prices
and likewise the standard of liv-
ing must remain low for some
time," Hollas said. "The amount
of currency in circulation is de-
liberately kept small, for if it
were increased, prices would rise,
and much increase in prices would
be likely to undermine public con-
fidence in the new currency."
Roth Tells About
tnuderground Job
If you've been worried lately
about the apparent undermining
of the Kellogg building and the
Health Service, take heart.
The extensive digging merely in-
dicates the installation of an in-
terceptor storm sewer, according
to Walter Roth, superintendent of
the University Plant Department.
The new 14-inch diameter pipe
will run from N. University up
Fletcher street to Washington,
and then down Washington to the
University laundry.
The sewer is intended to relieve
storm water in the northeast sec-
tion of the campus, Roth ex-
plained.
Many people on Santa Lucia in
the Windward Islands speak a
language compounded of French
with a West African syntax.

France Fears
Future Army
In Germany
Population Growth
Is Root of Trouble
By J. M. ROBERTSON JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
France, in proposing to restrict
the population of Germany by
emigration and other means,'
strikes at something far deeper
than mere military manpower.
The rapid growth within com-
paratively narrow borders of a
highly developed people lies at the
very root of all the trouble Ger-
many has caused. National boun-
daries are a poor thing behind
which to dam up such a popula-
tion when it is within sight of
lands less thickly populated by
less organized peoples. This is
the situation which handed Ger-
many over to a series of ruthless
expansionists.
It is natural for the French to
see German manpower principally
as army material. But, however
misdirected and lacking in techni-
cal ability, it is concentrated more
than twice as densely as that of
France, three times that of Po-
land, and was organized to meet
the requirements of the industrial
age on a far higher level than
most of its neighbors.
Poland has replaced with her
own people only about half the
normal population of the territory
annexed from Germany. This
leaves something of a vacuum,
while increasing the pressure in
the former Reich. That's why
American experts are proposing
the return of Lower Silesia to
Germany, with Poland to keep the
rest.

G

Steere

(Continued from Page 1) ?
trees makes flour of high food
value. Even sawdust will sustainI
life, he declared. Delicious bever-
ages can be made of brewing the
bark of sassafras or other trees,
as our ancestors discovered, he
said
Sugar Substitute
With sugar still in short supply,
Professor Steere pointed out that
many persons may be interested
and surprised to know that wal-
nut, hickory and birch trees, as
well as hard maple exude a sweet
sap which can be reduced by boil-
ing to sugar of distinctive flavors.
Many wild berries can be made
into piquant jams and jellies
which will be a delight to jaded
palates, he insisted .
A word of caution is extended
by the professor, who warned that
although only a few wild plants
are poisonous ,it would be wise
for amateur plant hunters to learn
to recognize for certain the best
edible varieties.
The fields, woods and ponds all
around us hold rich storehouses of
taste thrills, said Dr. Steere, who
predicted that the adventurous
soul who seeks them out will find
a rich reward-just as did the ear-
ly pioneers who first dared to eat
strange plants like the potato,
tomato, pea, or carrot, which later
became our most valuable foods.
Armenian Students
The Armenian Students Associ-
ation will hold a party at 7:30
p.m. Friday at 616 Church Street.
The party is open to all students
of American parentage.

Wild Grasses
Are Nutritious

Says

Election Rules
The following-rulesestablished by the election corinmitte of
the Student Legislature, will govern the campus elections today and
tomorrow.
1. No campaigning will be allowed within 50 feet of the ballot
box. (Campaigning is defined by the Men's Judiciary Council as any
attempt to influence the decision of qualified voters.)
2. No distribution of printed matter concerning the election
will be allowed within the area bounded by S. University, N. Uni-
versity, E. University, and S. State streets.
3. Each voter will number his choices of candidates consecu-
tively on the ballot. Under the Hare system of Proportional Rep-
resentation, he can vote for as many candidates as he desires but
need not vote for more than one.
4. Each voter must present his own identification card. Voting
by proxy will not be allowed.
5. Voting booths will be in the Angell Hall Lobby and the quon-
set hut at N. University and E. University.
6. A representative from the League, a member of Alpha Phi
Omega, and a Student Legislator will be present at each polling
place at all times.
7. A ballot will be given to each voter as he enters the election
booth. After filling out his ballot within the enclosed area, the
voter will present his folded ballot and his Identification Card at
the ballot box. His ID card will be bunched by attendant and his
ballot will be stamped and placed in the ballot box in full view of
the voter.
8. The ballots will be counted by members of the Student Leg-
islature's election committee.
9. The total vote cast and the names of the elected candidates
will be published in The Daily.
10. Ballots will be retained by the election committee for a
period of 30 days following the election.
11. Men's Judiciary Council shall hear all cases involving elec-
tion fraud and shall have the authority to disqualify offenders.

When you go
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)ot exira v alue for your Mioney- . In

other words, Daylivwrs are shcsfor girls who use
'eirh eads about their fee.
CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 SOUTH STATE

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Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds!

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JUST
HATCHED
... an idea for a lifetime Easter
gift. The new Peggy Sage cut-
lery sets found at CALKINS-
FLETCHER are just what you
have been looking for. These
ideal sets come in different
leathers.

NO="

As Featured in Glamour

\//'A K ING'S
RANSOM
Dramatize Your.new spring out-
fit . . . Select the perfect acces-
sory accent in dazzling rhine-
stones from EIBLER'S. Pins,
earrings and bracelets are love-
ly in matching sets or separate.

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ORIGINAL

HERALD THE
NEW ARRIVAL
... with soft knitted baby wear.
THE VAN AKKEREN KNIT
SHOP offers just what you
want in baby yarn. See our
selection now.
B
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sp+
dr
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A TOUCH OF
COLOR
. . to accentuate your spring
ensemble THE CAMPUS SHOP
suggests fabric gloves. Make
your choice from the newest
colors and various styles.

Ii'-.
Q ,

URSTING WITH
EW IDEAS
HE DILLON SHOP has a
otlight on gay print crepe
resses this spring. Featuring
e dramatic peplums, suave
de drapes, and flared brcks
hich are so prominent this
ason.
ii

Nothing could be newer, or smarter, or more delightful
than this Colleen Original. It's a gay printed crepe
and some days you'll wear it with the patent leather belt
and some days you won't. Just depends on your ipood.
Choos it in black or brown with a colorful stripe.
Sizes 10 to 16.
.4)111

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