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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 04, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


r. Gale Explains Basis
r U.S.--Asiatie Trade

fitable trade between the1
I States and Eastern Asia
t be developed without re-
uction of Japan, enlighten-i
hinese control of commerce
successful political adjust-
in Malaya and the Phil-,
s, Dr. Esson M. Gale, direc-
f the International Cente",
ned.
he current issue of the Mich-
Alumnus Quarterly Review,
ale pointed out that at least
L, restoration of Japanese
ry, under United States su-
ion, is a necessary measure.
I Delay Recovery
orn of her former empire,
i cannot expect to be of more
mic consequence than, for
ple, one of the Scandinavian
hurcb News
lowing Holy Communion at
.m. tomorrow, breakfast will
wved to members of the CAN-
IURY CLUB at the Student
. Fr. Frank McPhillips will
et the discussion of Catholic
ne to be held in the club
of ST. MARY'S CHAPEL at
p.m. today.
rnbers of the WESLEYAN
D will ' meet in the Guild
e at 7:30 a.m. today for
r, meditation, thoughts and
ure for a better understand-
the significance of the Len-

countries. But unless some mea-
sure of her ability to supply low-
price consumer goods to her Far
Eastern neighbors is restored, eco-
nomic recovery of the part of the
world will be delayed."
Future trade relations are also
dependent on the outcome of the
present upheaval, he said. The
Philippines must prove their abil-
ity to rule themselves and settle-
ment of the riots and revolutions
in Malaya and Indo-China must
be reached.
Dr. Gale felt that China's po-
tential economic gains depend
largely on the outcome of her
present internal political struggle.
Controls Ended -
"All foreign colonial controls,
long in effect in China, have now
been ended. All foreign conces-
sions have come under the control
of the Chinese authorities and it
remains to be seen how well the
Chinesewillmuse their new ability
to be the masters of their own
house," he said.
He pointed out that Southeast
Asia - Indo-China, Malaya and
se Philippines - have long been
the world's storehouse for essent-
ial and critical raw materials.
Though the United States became
more or less independent of this
source of supplies during the war,
Dr. Gale wrote, "if we expect to
sell, our goods to the teeming
populations in these areas we must
continue to buy from them liber-
ally, despite synthetic products,
now supplanting natural mater-
ials.
Managua, the capital of Nicara-
gua, is on the shores of Lake
Managua.

#

Fraternities
Publish New
Pledge Lists
32 Houses Affiliate
298 Members
(Continued from Page 1)
John M. Cox, Rex E. Curtis, Louis
M. Dyll, Donald H. Gray, William
F. Haberman, William J. Harrison,
Lexie E. Herrin, Donald D. Hostet-
ler, James I. Huston, Maxwell P.'
Iverson, William S. Jones, Edward
J. Lipp, Joseph Naymik, Arnold
J. Phillips, Richard M. Rappley
John A. Salles, Glenn W. Schneid-
er, Jack V. Stegenga, Leland P.
Stewart, John I. Swanson, Dale
Van Otteran, Phillip J. West.
Pi Lambda Phi: Stanley J.
Emerling, Alan L. Ferestein, Shel-
don B. Krause, James L. Popkin,
Marvin Israel Schwartz, Ivan El-
liot Shalit, David Myron Tabash-
nik.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon: William
E. Armantrout, Richard S. Brown,
Robert R. Burke, Emmett J. Con-
nors, William S. Dougall, Malvin
J. Leininger, Norman L. Pollard,
John A. Sherzer.
Sigma Alpha Mu: Alfred W.
Blumrosen, Allan B. Clamage,
David M. Ehrlich, David Frank,
Eugene D. Galin, Donald L. Har-
ris, Donald L. Herman, Irving Lak-
er, Byron H. Lasky, Seymour J.
Levine, George H. Lucks, Aaron
G. -Meislin, Milford Nemer, How-
ard L. Passman, Howard L. Rad-
ner, Gerald L. Robinowitz, Robert
H. Silver, Marvin W. Talan.
Sigma Chi: John S. Gannon,
Robert D. MacGregor, Harold J.
Morrill, Jere Ogle, James S. Wiley.
Sigma Nu: C. Carl J. Ally, Con-
ly S. Bouggy, Gaylord L. Baker,
Frank W. Brink, Robert W. Collie,
William A. Dart, Donald J. Davies,
William D. Flaskamp, William
Ford, Jr., Theodore W. Hall, Don-
ald E. Hemsteger, Francis H. Lor-
enz, Carl R. Moxon, Edward W.
Mueller, James H. Saker, W.
Wayne Sailors.
Sigma Phi: Richard K. Sim-
onds.
Sigma Phi Epsilon: Thomas N.
Cummings, Alan D. Fitch, John
H. Jacobs, Robert W. Johnson,
Richard L. LaMont, William J.
arcoux, Lee N. Vacarri, Herman
F. Zerweck.
Theta Chi: William C. Bailey,
Raymond G. Baker, Don R. Chel-
lis, Maurice W. Cochran, Jr., Pres
D. Holmes, Clyde V. House, Mar-
shall C. Lewis, James K. McEvoy,
William C. Miller, Alton S. Noble,
Hugh L. O'Hara, Lewis D. Parry,
Clyde B. Recht, John T. Seeber,
Robert P. Seeber, Donald A. Swan-
son, John H. Wilcox, Bruce A.
Witherspoon, John H. Wither-
spoon, Jack W. Zordell.
Theta Delta Chi: Paul B. Ham-
ilton.
Theta Xi: Floyde Allen, Alan
H. Anderson, Don Barnett, James
M. Chandler, Thomas L. Dickin-
son, Frederick Eareckson, Jr., Al-
bert Hyma, Jr., James Karras,
John S. Leonard, Ross D. Mar-
shall, William L. Matthews, Harry
Miller, Gerald A. O'Toole, Gilbert
Ross, Richard Rouse, Allen G.
Schmitt, Foster Thomson, John
M. Tillotson, Donald D. Van Wink-
le, Scott W.Woods.
Trigon: Bernard W. Baldwin,
John A. Faber, William J. Fan-
ning, Francis J. Harmon, Norman
C. Jimerson, James C. Kemp, Wil-
liam M. LeFevre, Arthur T. Nel-
son, George L. Nicholls, Charles
R. Remsburg, Melvin M. Smith,
Harry B. Stucky, Wilfred A. Sut-
ton.
Zeta Beta Tau: Donald H.

Greenfield, James S. Gutentag,
Donald G. Kaplan, Alan P. Lowen-
stern, Martin S. Mayer, Roger E.
Salamon, Edwin L. Perlmutter,
Robert R. Reinheimer, Donald P.
"Rothschild.
Zeta Psi: Eugene E. Adams,
Herbert D. Allee, William P. Cooke,
George Hawthorne, Charles G.
Murray.
611

Russia Will
Be Disenssed
y D. Ward
"Some Common Mistakes About
Russia" will be discussed by Dr.
Harry F. Ward at 4:15 p.m. to-
morrow in Rackham Ampitheatre
under the auspices of the Russian
Circle.
Dr. Ward is a profestor-emeri-
tus of Christian Ethics, Union
Theological Seminary, New York,
and general secretary of the Me-
thodist Federation of Social Ser-
vice.
After the first world war, Dr.
Ward served as chairman of the
American Civil Liberties Union
which worked toward guarantee-
ing full civil rights to conscienti-
ous objectors.
In 1934, he became chairman of
the American League Against War
and Fascism.
Best known works of Dr. Ward
are "The New Social Order," "Our
Economic Moyrality," "In Place
of Profit," "Democracy and Social
Change," and "The Soviet Spirit."
Dr. Ward will discuss "Democ-
racy and Social Change" at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow at Jones Public
School.

Job Forum
On Chemistry
To e Given
Jobs in the many fields of ap-
plied chemistry will be the sub-
ject of a forum to be held at 8
Sp.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Speakers at the informal meet-
ing will be Prof. Raymond N. Kel-
ler of the chemistry department
and Prof. Donald L. Katz of the
chemical engineering dlepartment.
Phi Lambda Upsilon, national
chemical honorary society. will
sponsor the occupational forum.
The purpose of the meeting is
to provide information to pros-
pective chemistry majors which
will help them to decide whether
to enter the field and what branch
would be the best one in each in-
dividual case, Prof. Keller said.
Statistics prepared by the Amer-
ican Chemical Society concerning
salaries in the different branches
of research and industry, the de-
grees of education needed for par-
ticular fields, and the numbers of
men and women at present engag-
d in these occupations will be pre-
sented by use of slides. Prof. Kel-
ler added.

EfsuitArt Sto ...
Anyone interested in working
on the art staff of the Ensian is
asked to contact Lorelei Neirman
at the Student Publications Build-
ing.
mg' , , .,
WAA Fencing Club ... ,
An organizational meeting of
the WAA Fencing Club will be
held at 4 p.m. today at the
Women's Athletic Building.
E~Xrgole eeig . -*
There will be a meeting of mem-
bers of all Gargoyle staffs at 4:15
p.m. today in the Student Pub-
lications Building. Ensian pic-
tures will be taken.
JWAA Board . .
The WAA Board will hold its
regular meeting at 5 p.m. today
in the Women's Athletic Build-
ing, according to Jean Brown,
WAA president.

HIGHLIGHTS ON Cl

.

Nursing Talk . .
Emilie Sargent, executive

dir-

11

I

' ike .dnA p 6-P 9iy we Skatih9 00
PRESENTS TlIE 5bt ANNLUAL WINTER CARNIVAL
MELODY ON ICE
ARRANGEl AND DIR ECTED) 1Y
illan1ltnce4 qpie4c/ke
OUTSTANDING STARS OF TH MID-WrST
BEAUTIFULLY COSTUMED
COMIC AND SPECTACULAR SKATING
CAST OF OvER 100
AT THE MICHIGAN RINK
SUNDAY AND MONDAY, MARCH 9 AND 10
Tickets at Union, Wahr's, Slaters and the Rink

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4____ _ _ . ___ __- _ _ - - _ __

T

r ie re

(Continued from Page 3)
La P'tite Causette: 3:30 p.m.
Grill Room, Michigan League.
Phi Kappa Tau- meeting, 7:15
p.m. Rm. 306, Michigan Union.
Dinner 6:30 p.m. Union Cafeteria.
Guest speaker, Tau Alumni presi-
dent, J. Cullen Kennedy.
Modern Dance Club: 5 p.m.,
Barbour Gym.
Dancing Classes: Registration,
7 p.m., Tues., March 4, for begin-
ners, and on Wednesday, March
5, for intermediates. The first of
the series of eight lessons will be-
gin immediately on each night.
Co-eds wishing to serve as Assist-
ant Teachers may sign up at this
time.
Christian Science Organization:
7:30 p.m., Upper Room. Lane Hall.
Bull Session on Zionism, spon-
sored by the Inter-Collegiate
Zionist Federation, 8 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation. Import-
ant business meeting will follow.
All are invited to attend.'

day noon,
League.

Romance Language Journal
Club: 4:15 p.m., Wed., March 5'
West Conference Room, Rackhamr
Building. Prof. C. N. Staubach .
will speak on "Character and So-
cial Pressures in the novels of J.
A. Osoria Lizarazo." The stalfl
and all interested graduate stu-
dents are cordially invited.
Delta Sigma~ Pi, professional
Business Administration fratern-
ity; 7:30 p.m., Wed., March 5,

Russian Tea

Room,

Rm. 321, Union. Business meet-
ing.
Dr. Harry F. Ward, of the Union
Theological Seminary will speak
on the subject, "Some Common
Mistakes About Russia," at' 4:15
p.m., Wed., Rackham Amphithea-
tre; auspices of the Russian Circle.
The public is cordially invited.
B'nai B'rith Iillel Foundation:
Forensics Committee, 3-5 p.m.,
Wed., March 5. Everyone interest-
ed is invited.

ector of the Detroit Visiting Nurse
Association, will speak on "Trends
in Nursing" at 3:30 p.m. today in
the public health school auditor-
ium.
* * *
Dantcing Claus.s
Registration for this semest-
er's dancing classes will be held
at 7 p.m. today and tomorrow in
the League Ballroom.
The first class will be held im-
mediately after registration. All
women who want to be instruc-
tors for the classes may also
sign up at this time.
Zionist Discussion. .
The Inter - Collegiate Zionist
Federation Vill sponsor a discus-
sion on Zionism at 8 p.m. today

hQPI N ipcce4

at the B'nai B'rith Hillel Fc
dation.
A business meeting will fo
the session. Anyone intereste
invited -to attend.
* * *
U1 ion Cof fee Hour
The first Union sponsored >
ulty-Student Coffee Hour of
semester will be presented at
p.m. tomorrow in the Union '
race room. The mechanical e
neering department will be h
ored at the meeting and all
dents interested are invited tc
tend. Coffee and refreshm
will be served.
For a gay Yule note, han
long red bow on the back of
door with Christmas bells
gling from it.

NOWWA-MMOMM

*

TONIGHT at 8:00 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $1.20 (tax incl.) On Sale:
League, Union, Record Stores

Ma7iia~nu

JUST

ARRIVED!

Coming to HILL AUDITORIUM, Fri., March 21st
TWO SHOWS!! 7:00 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED!!
DIRECT FROM "Corn"EGIE HALL
l~ j5WIT H 14
A EXPLOSIVE VODVIL ACTS!
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED NOW:.
Tickets on sale starting Monday, March 3, from
9 a.m. at Union, League, and University Hall.
Mail check payable Panhellenic Association and self-addressed
stamped envelope to Panhellenic Office, Michigan League Building,
Ann Arbor
Auspices: Penhellenic Association
Benefit of the U. of M. Fresh Air Camp
"For the Lone of Mike - Don't AYiss Spike"

NOB
ENTANGLEMENTS
THE VAN AKEREN KNIT
SHOP has just received a
supply of bobbins that will
help you steer clear of knit-
ting difficulties. Now your
yarn won't get tangled.

a\I
V.,

New Shipment of
IHEAFFER PENS

$3.50 and up

at

Corning Events
Seniors in Architecture and De-
sign who will graduate in June or
August will meet Wed., Mar. 5, 5
p.m., Rm. 101, Arch. Bldg., to elect
class officers.
Radio Club: 7:30 p.m., Thurs.,
March 6, Rm. 220, W. Engineer-
ing Bldg. Mr. J. F. Cline, W8OSP,
of Electrical Engineering staff,
will speak on "How Harmful Are'
Standing Waves?" Everyone in-
terested cordially invited.
"The Campus Construction Pro-
gram" will be the subject of an
A.I.A. sponsored address by Mr.
Lynn Fry on Wednesday, March
5, 4 p.m. in the Architecture Audi-
torium. The public is invited.
Camp Counsellors' Club: Crafts
workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Thurs., March 6, W.A.B. All wom-
en interested, whether they have
had camping experience or not
are invited .
Underwriters: Movie p a r t y,
Wednesday, March 5, 8:30 p.m.
Meet in League Lobby. Also, reg-
ular luncheon meeting, Wednes-

OF SPRING
For your new spring en-
semble, select some fine jew-
- elry from EIBLER'S. We
have a grand assortment of
bracelets, earrings, broaches,
and necklaces, gold and sil-
ver-filled, plain or gold set-
ting.

I

1}.

EE 71

A TOUCH

FOuLLETTS
322 'South State Phone 6363

INITIALS
Artfully designed for listing
beauty, these English script
gold-platd initials personalize
your accessories. Worn singly
or in twos and threes, they
add glaor and excitement to
your lags, -loves, scarfs,
belts, sweaters andswrits.

It
an 3c
K..

YOUR NAME

IN PRINT

11

. . scattered on a pretty,
white, crepe, cap - sleeved
blouse. Have your name
printed in one of these color
combinations; fuschia and
royal, red and green, or red
and b ro wn. MAD7EMOI-
SELLES assures two weeks
delivery.

4'.

SALE

CONTINUES
OXFORD CLOTH SHIRTS

11

Tan
Blue
Green

Plain Collar
Button Down Collar
Slotted Stay Collar

G and 7
Your teacher probably told you by now that the
seventh letter in the alphabet is a G and it stands
for

$2.99

I

JUST ARRIVED!

New Shipment of

SPRING

SLACKS

QUALITY PRINTING
(Pronounced GETScraft)

... . . . .....
f :..

8'.~
1"

/

3 for

DATE-TIME

AND DAY-TIME
THE DILLON SHOP has
dresses for both occassions.
New print and pastel crepes
for those evening dates and
light wool gabardines for af-
ternoon wear .

-- ..-f
.., r/ r

Comfort such as you'll Ind
in these cotton or seersucker
pajamas will surely help you
along the road of pleasant
dreams. See CAMPUS
SHOP'S supply now.

'A
\'I 'C _
t I'
/...

'w

PLEASANT
DREAMS

Gabardines ... Doeskins
Worsteds
Grey Flannels in Solids and
White Chalk Stripes

PAINTI N'

11

,.IL

i

!11

Illy i

11

i

11111

l ill

II 11I III II

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