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March 19, 1946 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-19

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PAGE S

THE M\ICHIGAN DAILY

Tl[?r,,' ?IDA T, MAIROT 19, 19

PAGE SiX TTIJE$DAT, MAU~U 19, 4G

'HEALTH OF NAT IONS'
Public Officials To Meet Here
For Conference March 27, 28

Designed to stimulate interest in
more full-time health programs, a
series of Conferences for Public Of-
ficials will be sponsored by the School
of Public Health Wednesday and
Thursday, March 27 and 28.
This conference, planned primarily
for the city, county and district
health directors of Michigan and
members of their health boards and
committees, including members of
boards of supervisors, will deal with
problems of public and community
Civil Service
Jobs Available
For Seniors
Technical Aid positions in the City
of Detroit municipal service are open
to University seniors who pass a civil
service examination April 12 in Ann
Arbor.
Men And Women Eligible
Designed for men and women with,
little work experience, but possessing
a minimum educational requirement
of three college years, the position of
Technical Aid will require technical
or managerial responsibilities. It
offers a good chance for advance-
ment, according to the Detroit Civil
Service Commission.
The examination is open to all citi-
zens between 20 and 25 regardless of
residence. It will concern the three
fields of business administration,
medical science and general infor-
mation.
Representative In Ann Arbor
A civil service representative will
interview interested seniors Thurs-
day, March 28 and Friday, March 29
in Ann Arbor. The representative will
be at the Michigan Municipal League,
205 S. State, in the mornings and at
the Union during afternoons and eve-
nings.
Veterans' preference on the exam
includes extension of the age limit by
the' amount of time spent in the
armed forces, and Detroit veterans
will have additional points added to
their examination score depending on
length and type of service and dis-
ability.
Leland Stowe
To Speak Here
Author Will Deliver
Final Lecture in Series
Leland Stowe, final speaker in the
Oratorical Association Series, will
speak on the topic "What We May
Expect in the Future" at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday at Hill Auditorium.
Author of the best seller "They
Shall Not Sleep," Stowe has been a
foreign correspondent since 1932, cov-
ering events of world importance
from London to Istanbul, South
America and the Far East. In 1939
the New York Herald Tribune, for
which he had reported for 18 years,
told him he was too old to be a war
correspondent. The Chicago Daily
News, however, didn't consider his
40 years too many, and offered him a
post abroad covering the war for the
News and 14 other papers.
Grad Student
Gets Fellow ship
Emma Ruth Hedeman, grad, has
been awarded the Dean Van Meter
fellowship by Goucher College, an
annual fellowship given only to
alumnae of the college.
Miss Hedeman, a native of Balti-
more, graduated from Goucher in
1931, and received her A.M. degree
from Duke University. She taught in
Ialtimore public schools until 1943
when she enlisted in the WAVES.

Recently released from the Navy,
in which she served as Lieutenant,
Miss Hedeman has been at the Uni-
versity taking graduate work in as-
tronomy.

relations. Attendance will be by in-
vitation only, and it is expected that
approximately 125 will attend.
An informal reception at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, March 26, will precede
the program. Following registration
at 9 a.m. Wednesday, the confer-
ences will formally begin with dis-
cussions on the economics of
health; first from the viewpoint of
the public health director, by Dean
Henry F. Vaughan of the School of
Public health; and second, from the
viewpoint of the public official, by
Mayor Charles 11. Leonard of Hlast-
ings.
The afternoon program will fea-
ture group discussions on organizing
and financing the health program. A
contrast between districts, counties,
and cities with full-time health de-
uartmcnts will be presented by Roy
Hooper, member of the Board of Su-
pervisors of Grand Traverse County,
Otto K. Engelke, Health Director of
Washtenaw County, and L. V. Bur-
kett, Genesee County Health Director,
respectively.
A plan for nation-wide health
units, offered by Prof. Haven Emer-
son of the School of Public Health,
will begin the lectures Thursday
morning. This will be followed by
a "State-wide Health Program for
Michigan" by William De Kleine
Commissioner of the Michigan De-
partment of Health, and a discus-
sion of post-war health problems
by Col. John E. Gordon of the U. S.
Army.
The afternoon program will consist
of group discussions of health prob-
lems in specific areas of the state.
Russell J. Pleune, of the Michigan De-
partment of Health, will lead the dis-
cussion on Northern Michigan, and
W. B. Prothro, Health Director of
Kalamazoo county, will speak on
Michigan cities.
A general assembly, in which re-
ports by group leaders will be given,
is scheduled to conclude the Confer-
ences.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
Theater on Wednesday and Thursday
at 8:30 p.m.
The Romance Language Journal
Club will meet on Wednesday, March
20, at 4:15 p.m. in the East Confer-
ence Room of the Rackham Building.
Professor Ralph Hammett of the
Architectural Department will speak
on the "Preservation of Culture in
France."
A I E E: Professor Attwood will
speak on the subject, "Radar and
Weather," Wednesday, March 20, at
7:30 p.m. at the Michigan Union. Re-
fresien ts.
Alpha Phi Omega will hold a neet-
ing on Wed., March 20, at 7:30 p.m.
at the Michigan Union. All men who
were once members of A.P.O. on this
or other campuses are invited. Also
any man on campus who has had
some scouting experience and who is
interested in ALPHA PHI OMEGA's
program is cordially invited to come
and get acquainted.
lte All'ication l Co,Imittrfe of the
Iut er-Ctooperative Council will pre-
sent a talk by Dr. Redman of the Uni-
tarian Church: ,The Role of the
Church in Modern Society," on Fri-
day. March 22 at 8:00 p.m., at Robert
Owen Cooperative, 1017 Oakland Ave.
Everyone is invited. There will be
Community singing and refresh-
ments.
hillel Social Committee: The meet-
ing scheduled for 3:30 p. in., on Wed-
nesday at the Foundation Center is
changed to 7:30 p.m. the same day.
It is important that all members of
this committee be present.

Flying Club: There will be an im-
portant business meeting Wednesday.
March 20, in Room 1042 East Engi-
neering Building at 7:30 p.m. All stu-
dents and members of the faculty are
invited to attend.

Highlights
On Campus
Voice ccital . .
Nadine Lindquist Flinders, o
tralto, assisted by Marian Owen, pian
ist, will present a recital at 8:30 p.m.
today in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
A voice instructor in the School of
Music, Mrs. Flinders came to the
University from the staff of North
Texas State Teachers College at Den-
ton, Texas. Her study of voice in-
cluded work at Juilliard Summer
School and Eastman School of Music
where she received her Master of
Music degree.
Miss Hedeman has been at the Uni-
selections by Handei, Dowl a n d,
Brahms, Ravel and Rachmaninoff.
All-Nans' Club...
The All-Nations Club will elect
officers during the weekly meeting
at 7:15 p.m. Thursday in the In-
ternational Center.
The club will sponsor a tea dance
from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday in the Cen-
ter for all foreign and American
students.
Polo nia Club TIo)Meet.,.
The University of Michigan Polonia
Club will hold a meeting at 7:30 p.m.
today in the International Center.
All students of Polish descnt are
invited to join. The semester's plans
include several cultural and social
events. At the present time, the Po-
lonia Club is compiling a musical
library which will include albums of
Polish composers, folk songs, and
melodies based on various Polish
dances.
The following were elected officers
for the Spring Term: Elisha Wis-
zowaty, president; Edwin B. Ugorow-
ski, vice-president; Cecilia A. Gwozdaz
secretary; and Benedict M. Polcin,
treasurer.
Mexican Moviee
Presented by the Art Cinema
League in conjunction with L
Sociedad Hispanica, "Flor Silves-
tre" (The Wildflower) will be shown
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow and Thurs-
day in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
The film which stars Delores del
Rio, is the story of the evolution of
Mexico. It presents the fight be-
tween the old and new ideologies
and their effect on a particular
family.
The dialogue of the film is in
Spanish with English subtitles ap-
pearing on the screen.
Stump Speakers .,.
"Do Dirigibles Deserve Further De-
velopment?" will be the subject of a
general discussion at the regular
meeting of Sigma Rho Tau, engineer-
ing stiump speakers society. at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union.
Prelimninaries in impronritu'peak-
ing will also be held at this meeting
in preparation for a contest with
other chapters scheduled for May,
and the date for the annual "Hall of
Fame" contest will be announced.
According to Margaret Carroll,
president of Sigma Rho Tau, efforts
are being made to build up a chapter
of the society among the veterans
housed at Willow Run.
Comrlposition and operation of the
Navy's Radio Proximiy Fuze will
be revealed to the campus for the
first time at 4 p.m. Monday, when
lantern slides and a Navy sound
film will be presented in Rm. 348
West Engineering Building.
The public has been invited to at-
tend

TIME
MAGAZINE
Special
Student Rate
2.67 for 8 months

D UCNR NW

ASSOCIATED

P RESS

V I S I T 0 R - Gabriela Mis-
tr'l, Chilean Nobel prize winner
for poetry, shown in New York
on her return from Stockholm.

M 0 T 0 R I N G O V E R A D A M-With wartime restrictions removed, tourists motor ovex
"the top of Boulder Dam, built across the Colorado River between Nevada and Arizona.

C O A C H -Capt. Tom Ham.
ilton, (above) onetime Navy
gridiron star, is the U. S. Naval
Academy's newv head football
coach, replaicing Cmdr. Oscar E.
Hagberg.

M A N I L A R E C ON S T R UC TIO.N - Workmen clamber over scaffolding to repair
Manila buildings, while a motion picture theatre continues with business as usual.(

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
OF MICHIGAN CHAPTER OF
TRIONGLE
FRflTERNITY
Desires to contact all members of any
chapter of the fraternity who are

V A S T M A N - M A D E L A K E - View of Lake Mead, one of the world's largest artificial lakes, taken about 30 miles above
Boulder Dam at a .oint where the lake is several miles wide. Sportsmen praise the bass fishing in this area.)'

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