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March 17, 1946 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-17

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~~Y' ~ 1~~T' MI~~~A N DAILY --_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Kallenbach Discusses Coalitiot
Seeking Control of Congress
t!5 -e

SoulIetrIIN Alliaiwe
ras* sPartyhue
A large group of Southern Demo-
crats and Republicans have recently
teamed up in an organized bid for
control of Congress, with the im-
mediate goal of whittling down the
powers of OPA.
"The only way in which the pre-
sent Congressional coalIit ion differs
from many previous coalitions," Prof.
Joseph E. Kallenbach of the political
science department stated yesterday,
"is that it has a formal committee
organization whereas the others were
herely informal."
Group is Not New
There is nothing new in this type
of group, he explained. They seem to
be inherent in a two party system
such as ours. Since each of the ma-
jor parties is made up of widely di-
vergent elements, there is a wide
gulf that separates the wings of the
parties and it is only natural that
there should be alliances that cross
party lines.
"This is simply a manifestation of
strong political presure brought to
bear on individual members of Con-
gress by constituents and others, to
which they respond," Prof. Kallen-
bach declared. "The American people
do not care for party members to be
under a strong party discipline. This
has never been a characteristic of
our political system."
Coalition To Block OPA
'The present coalition," Kallen-
bach claimed, "which consists of Re-
publicans and Southern Democrats,
is a carry-over from the group which
favored the labor disputes bill now
before the Senate. The part played by
Southern Democrats is due to the
fact that they have never agreed
wholeheartedly with New Deal poli-
cies in relation to labor.,"
The present problem which the
coalition intends to deal with is the
OPA legislation now before Congress.
I doubt, Prof. Kallenbach contended,
that they will have complete success
in their attempts to limit the power
of this agency. They may succeed in
Programn Tesis
Grad Students
More than 400 graduate students
took the graduate record examina-
tions last week as a part of theInsti-
tutional Testing Program under the
auspices of the Graduate School.
Required of all graduate students
planning to receive a graduate de-
gree from the University, the test is
divided into two sections.
The first section is designqd to
evaluate the student's general know-
ledge and academic background. It
deals with eight fields: chemistry,
physics, mathematics, biological
sciences, social sciences, English lit-
erature, fine arts and also what is
known as the verbal factor.
The second section of the test ex-
amines the student in his own field
of specialization. Examinations in six-
teen fields of concentration are of-
fered in this section. Students whose
previous education is not fitted to
any of the specific tests available are
given examinations which are related
as nearly as possible to the subjects
which they have studied.
\ SH E USE D
yn~ a brush

andComb"
a nA Y D A U M ET S
This sensat onal creaIm shampoo
leaves hair obedient,
pliable, gleaming, and so
fresh and clean. Easy to $,00
use. Ajar lasts a long time

eliminating the subsidy progriun.
which is now part of OPA.
"Once a measure of success has
been obtained," he continued, "the
group will probably enter into the
whole area of government restric-
tions upon free enterprise to prevent
further government controls. They
also have interests in the jabor situa-
tion."
Bi-partisans Act Independently
On the whole, this can be said in
exoneration of bi-partisan bloc ac-
tion, Prof. Kallenbach concluded:
it disproves the charges of many
persons that Congress members are
mere rubber stamps of party and exe-
:utive policies.
"The situation created by this coa-
lition is complex but by no means un-
usual. It should also be kept in mind
that there are factions of contrary
opinion to counteract activities ofk
this particular bloc."

Close Relations
In Classroom
A re Lacking
Whatilac ;king ii our modlrn
cdlucational system is a close rela-
tionship of the instructor, to the
student, said Dr. David Sonquist, edu-
cational director of Circle Pines
Damp, Kalamazoo, at an informal dis-
cussion yesterday afternoon at Mur-
iel Lester Co-operative House. .
"The role of teachers is basic," he
stressed, "and we will endeavor to
associate with us those leaders who
posses qualitics of insight and ider-
standing of the cultural trends of
the past."
The camp, designed by Frank Lloyd
Wright, will follow the pattern set
by Danish Folk Schools, the most pro-
gressive educational movement of the
century. As substitute for grades and
degrees, educators will emphasize the
intrinsic value of subjects in an ef-
fort to stimulate creative initiative.

The University of Califoria leac~ds
every other school in the country in
the development of extension classes
according to Dr. Charles A. Fisher,
director of the University Extension
Service.
Dr. Fisher, who recently returned
from a four week's tour of extension
centers at universities and colleges
throughout the Middle and Far West.
gays California leads the list both
from the standpoint of total enrcll-
ment and of total revenue.
Dr. Fisher visited the Indiana Uni-
versity extension center at Fort
Wayne and the centers in Indiana-
polis run by Indiana and Purdue Uni-
versities.
Michigan, he found, has more non-
credit students (three-fourths of the
total enrollment) in its extension
courses than any other school. He
discovered also that Michigan pays
it extension teachers much better
than the average.
In regard to contests-athletic, d -

Fisher Cites Extension Work

bating, oratory, music, etc.-conduct-,
ced by the extension service for high
school students, the University of
Texas ranks at the top.
At, the University of Texas, the
State Board in control of Vocational
Educat ion works in a very close re-
lationship to the university exten-
sion service. This cooperaion, Dr.
Fisher said, represents a big improve-
ment over an independent function-
ing of the two services.
Give to the Red Cross
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
S). MORRILIL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. U of M STUDENTS QUIZ TIIEIR PROFESSORS
OF EDUCATION
"The Behavior of Children in School"
Dr. Willard C. Olsen, prof. of Education
2:45 p.m. COMMUNITY IN ACTION
"The 12th Street Neighbors Center"
Mr. Leonard Weiner
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. CAMPUS NEWS
Prepared by Rosamond laas of the University News
Service.
Presented by the following students enrolled in broad-
casting classes: Audrey Enelow from Wheeling,
West Virginia; William Ludwig from Grosse Pointe
Park, Mich.; Mildred Weeks from Monroe, Michigan.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. ADVENTURES IN RESEARCIH
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. EPOChS IN MUSIC
Program under the supervision and direction of Pro-
fessor Hanns Pick
2:30 p.m. EDUCATION FOR THE VETERAN
Prepared by Mr. Clark Tibbits of the Veterans Service
Bureau.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Common Misconceptions About the Heart"
Dr. Franklin Johnston
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE UNIVERSITY CARILLON
Played by Mr. Sidney Giles. Commentated by Mr.
Keith McKenney.
Station WJR
11:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Rheumatism"
Dr. William I). Robinson
FRIDAY:
Station WVAIKAR
2:30 pam. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-cnaaict'd radio plays.
Directed by Professor David 'Owen.
2:45 p.m. RELIGION IN REVIEW
"Mental Health through Achievement"
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, Counselor in Religious Edu-
cation.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. DORO TV OrNES', prasmo
A program in the rieg uar series of i rllc-known and
best-loved songs.
SATURDAY:
Station WJR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. STUMP THlE PROFESSOR. A quiz pro-
gram with a panel of University professors answering
the questions.
SIN )AY
Station WJVI
9:15 am. to 0:45 a.im. .IYMS 0(F iA IEE' u.oi.a
Quartet directed by Ernest Larsen. Coinieuta led by
Dr. Donald E. Ilargis.

NEW YORK (GREIFTS CI 7'rFIlL IN RAIN - Winston Churchill,
fcri-er Prim MinisTr of Great Britain, 'is atop rear seat of an open
automobile in New York ('ity in .te rain. lie was officially welcomed
to the city by Mayor William ')Dwyer.
Illinois Basketbail Toumrey
Worth EIt Pairs of Nylons

Editor's Note: with this issue, tile Daily
begins a weekly feature resume of stud-
ent opinions and actions, gleaned from
college publications all over the coun-
try. Where'll be stories of how other cam-
puses feel about the quesiions of the
day-from housing and world govern-'
ment to blue books and green pots..
At the University of Illinois, the
proud possesors of tickets to the state
basketball tournament (lines formed
for the ticket sales at 4 a.m. in some
schools, complete with pillows to soft-
ten the ordeal) were being offered
eight pairs of nylons for two of the
precious little pieces of cardboard.
Plans a UNO in Miniature
Northwestern University has set up
a mock UNO, with security council,
general assembly and all, to discuss
the problems of world organization
and illustrate them by actuai prac-
tice. The first all-campus function
in the series was a newspaperimen s
forum at which three professional
journalists discussed the question,
"Will the UNO Work?**
Nearly 150 Michigan high schools
will be visited this week by former
students who are now attnding
Michigan State College, the Michigan
State News reports. The students,
chosen from the highest gradI groups
at their schools, will answer ques
tions about Michigan State College.
ranging from admissions to socialil

activities. This is a function formerly
undertaken by faculty members.
Live in 'Sunflower Village'
At the University of Kansas 300
married veterans and their wives and
children are living at Sunflower Vil-
lage in quarters once used by work-
ers at the Sunflower Ordnance Works,
a situation comparable to the Michi-
gan Vets' Village. Managing Editor
Becky Vallette of the University Daily
Kansan visited the village, and re-
ported that in spite of the drab view
and barracks-like surroundings, "the
GI's are adapting themselves to these
iny, inconvenient homes with the
same (heerful attitude that they
adapted themselves to the Pacific,
Africa and Europe."
The Indiana Daily Student re-
ports the topic for that university's
most recent town hall discussion-
"Why Have Finals?"
Opposes Frosh 'Beanies'
The 7 udent Affairs Committee at
the University of Illinois has gone
on record as disapproving the pro-
posed revival of tile time-honored
custom of requiring freshmen to
wear green caps.
The Minnesota Daily reports that
rcal estate agencies in Minneapolis
and Saint Paul are agreeing to give
university veterans advance' n o -
tice of from two days to a week on
ho iss avai lable for purchases be-
fore public sale.

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