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June 20, 1946 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-20

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN IAfY

THURSDAY, JUNE

2PAOE EIGHT TUVRSDAY, JUNE

Navy Training Extension Service Offers

Institute To Train Public
Administration Experts

Program Is To
End JulyIst
1,455 Officers
Graduated Here
The University was one of 52 col-
leges and schools throughout the
country participating in the Navy's
accelerated training program which
officially ends July 1, with a record
of 3,451 students enrolled and 1,455
graduated to serve as officers with
the ships of the fleet.
V-12, V-5, NROTC and medical
students were receiving instruction
here at the peak period in 1943 when
there was a total of 1,518 enrolled.
Current enrollment, comprising one
Marine and four Naval companies, is
478.
Begun in 1942
The V-12 and V-5 programs were
initiated here during the summer of
1942 in order to more speedily train
and educate larger numbers of of-
ficers than could be accommodated
in the NROTC Unit, commissioned
in 1940.
Four terms of training were pro-
vided by the V-12 and NROTC pro-
grams, under which students could
elect any courses they desired in
addition to required Naval science
courses. A specialized training pro-
gram ranging from six to twelve
terms was set up for potential offi-
cers.
Upon graduation from the Univer-
sity, V-12 trainees were sent to mid-
shipman's school for six months ad-
ditional training in preparation for
commissioning, while NROTC stu-
dents, who were required to take at
least 24 hours of Naval science
courses, were commissioned ensigns
at the time of commencement.
Final Class
At the end of the war, the pro-
gram was still in existence. This final
class graduated will be commissioned,
put on active duty or discharged if
they have sufficient points. Of the
172 NROTC students who will grad-
uate at ceremonies June 22, 72 have
requested active duty with the fleet
as ensigns for six months, and will
be commissioned at the time of com-
mencement. Those who applied for
inactive status will graduate, but
their commissions will be sent to
their homes.
Present plans provide for a 3001
man peacetime NROTC program
here. 125 of the men already enrolled
here will continue in the program.
Providing legislation is passed by
Congress, the government will pay
tuition, $50 per month for eachj
member and uniforms for those whoj
have fulfilled academic and physical
requirements to enter the program.

Wide Range of Courses

By FRANCES PAINE
From short courses for fire fighters
to conferences for Protestant pas-
tors, and from classes in child care
and training to post-graduate engin-
eering courses in automobile body
design -such is the wide range of
activities included in the work of the
University ftxtension Service.
Much of the . work of the Ex-
tenIon Service., which is under
the direction of Dr. Charles A.
Fi-hcr, with offices in Rm. 107
Haven Hall, has recently been con-
rernied With short courses and in-
stitutes lasting from one day to a
week. Tile first of these this school
year was the 16th annual Parent
Education Institute, which was
held in November in Detroit and
Full-Time Use
Of Rackham in
Detroit Possible
Offering a plan which would ame-
liorate what now appears to be an
inevitable housing shortage next fall,
made even more acute by an in-
creased enrollment, a University ad-
mini,, trator has suggested that the
Rackham Building in Detroit be used
as a full-time branch of the Uni-
versity.
He said that students, residing in.
and around Detroit could attend "a
University in Detroit," and get their
University credit.
Could Ease Burden.
While this idea is not an overall
panacea to the problem of soaring
enrollment at the University, it, nev-
ertheless, is one way of easing the
local burden, he pointed out.
He estimated that 1,000 students
could work conveniently at the Rack-
ham Building in the Motor City.
It is not known whether the Uni-
versity will seriously consider this
proposal, although ways and means
of solving the problem of limited
capacity are being discussed.
Detroit Faculty Required
"Such an undertaking would re-
quire a faculty drawn from in and
around Detroit but that's not en-
tirely out of the question," he de-
clared.
With 68 per cent of the Michigan
veterans returned to civilian life, it
is extremely difficult to estimate the
number of enrollment applications
for the fall semester, he said, but it
is very likely that the number will
approach 20,000.
(Previous official University esti-
mates have placed fall semester en-
rollment at "approximately 18,000.")

Grand Rapids, in cooperation with
the Michigan Congress of Parents
and Teachers.
Another series held last fall i
several Michigan cities was the Hom
Planners Institute, intended for peo
ple who were going to build -home
in the post-war period and wante
to learn something about choosing
home sites, designing homes, select-
ing material, interior decoration
financing, etc. This series was giver
with the cooperation of the College
of Architecture and Design.
In January of this year the Ex-
tension Service and the Michigan
Council of, Churches combined tc
hold a Michigan Pastors' Conference
in Ann Arbor, attended by about 450
ministers. Prof. Paul F. Tillich of
Union Theological Seminary was the.
chief speaker.
On March 1 the Extension Service
cooperated with theForemen's Clubs
Association of Foremen to hold a
Foremen's Conference in the Rack-
ham Educational Memorial in Detroit,
This was attended by about 1250
foremen of industrial and manufac-
turing concerns in the metropolitan
area. Also at the Detroit Rackham
Building in March, a Reporters'
Clinic, the first of its kind ever given
by the Extension Service, provided
instruction for reporters on industri-
al publications, scribes of American
Legion posts, publicity chairmen for
women's clubs and others.
The 14th annual Adult Education
Institute was held May 14, 15 and
16 in Ann Arbor, under the joint
sponsorship of the Extension Ser-
vice and the Michigan Federation
of Women's Clubs. Four series of
lectures - "The World Today,"
"World Citizenship," "The Amer-
ican Home" and "The Results of
Scientific Discovery" - were given
by 11 University faculty members.
The "Fire College," a five day pro-
gram which will be held at the end
of June in Ann Arbor, will give fire-
men from all communities in the
Lower Peninsula instruction in fire
fighting, fire hazards and other
phases of their work. It will be com-
bined with a state convention of
firemen.
Another phase of the extension
work is the lecture service, which is
continually sending out faculty
members to other cities and towns
of the state to lecture before schools
and other community organizations.
A special feature of the lecture
service last fall was carried on in
cooperation with the Office of Inter-
American Affairs at Washington.
Groups of Latin-American students
at the University travelled to various
cities in the Lower Peninsula to lec-
ture about their native lands before
smaller colleges, high schools, service
clubs, Spanish classes, etc.
Extension Service programs last
autumn were highlighted by speech-
es by Dr. and Mrs. Harry Allen Over-
street, adult educators in Town Hall,
New York, who conducted a series of
lectures and discussions at the Rack-
ham Building in Detroit. Their
courses, according to Dr. Overstreet,
were planned to "make true demo-
crats, to give individuals a larger
individuality and save them from the
littleness of self-concern." The
series focussed attention on the in-
dividual, and the one on personality
development was especially well at-
tended.
In addition to these individual
lectures, the Extension Service
this year has given a total of 471
credit and non-credit classes in
about 40 Michigan communities,
taught by an estimated 180 faculty
members. The class-work program
is under the direction of Everett A.
Soop, assistant director of the Ex-
tension Service.
"Undoubtedly one of the best at-
tended and most popular of these

courses," according to Dr., Fisher, is
the class on discussion of current
non-fiction books, now in its 15th
year, given every Thursday night at
the Detroit Rackham Building by
.Prof. Wesley H. Maurer of the jour-
nalism department.

WILLIAM COOK LAW QUADRANGLE - housing one
units for training lawyers in the nation. The sandstone
cupy ten acres on the University campus.
THE LAMP IS LOW:

of the finest
buildings oc-

*

Law Quadrangle Still Scene
Of Feverish Academic Activity

By CLAYTON DICKEY
Is inefficiency the price of democ-
racy?
The University answered this ques-
tion decisively in the negative early
this semester with the establishment
of the Institute of Public Administra-
tion designed to furnish competent
public servants to all levels of gov-
ernment.
The Institute, headed by Prof.
John A. Perkins, of the political
science department, will open its
doors at the start of the summer
session.
Established following a year's study
by a special faculty committee, the
Institute will offer a twh-year grad-
uate curriculum leading to the degree
Master of Public Administration.
The degree of Master of Engineer-
ing and Public Administration will be
awarded students who complete a
special program.
The Institute will take over the
former curriculum in public admin-
istration offered by the Graduate
School.
The Institute's curriculum will in-
clude courses in the School of Busi-
ness Administration, the College of
Architecture and Design, the College
of Engineering, the Law School, the
political science, economics, sociology
and psychology departments of the
literary college and interdepartment-
al seminars.
Facilities for research training will
be provided by the University's Bur-
eau of Government, directed by Prof.
Robert S. Ford, of the economics de-
partment.
Behind the Institute is the omi-
nous prediction of Prof. Perkins
that unless the people can get ef-
ficient administration of the laws

passed by their elected representa-
tives, they will scuttle democracy.
Because persons charged with re-
sponsibility for government adminis-
tration are aware of the people's
challenge, wide opportunities for col-
lege-trained public servants exists in
the field today.
As reported by Prof. Perkins, there
are large demands for qualified per-
sons to fill these positions in local.
state and federal government agen-
cies:
Junior administrative positions fill-
ed by competitive examinations or
other merit system procedures;
Positions as staff assistants to key
administrators in manynoperating
departments of government;
Positions in private bureaus and
quasi-public agencies.
A definite boost to the idea of
graduate training in public admin-
istration was given recently by Prof.
Leonard D. White, of the Univer-
sity of Chicago's Department of
Public Administration, in a lecture
here.
A former member of the United
States Civil Service Commission, Prof.
White reported that the civil serv-
ice examinations for the position of
junior administrative assistant are
designed to detect a definite know-
ledge of public administration tech-
nique. Formerly they were merely
designed to detect "fine minds".
The Institute will get under way
July 1 with the opening of the sum-
mer session. Early estimates of en-
rollment in the course for public ser-
vants indicate wide campus interest
according to the political science de-
partment. A large veteran enrollment
is anticipated.

Alumni will find that University
law students still are burning mid-
night oil in the nationally-famed
William Wilson Cook Law Quad-
rangle.
Housing one of the first units com-
pletely organized and equipped for
training lawyers and for research
in legal science, the sandstone Law
buildings of a late Jacobean type of
Gothic architecture occupy ten acres
of the University campus. The Quad-
rangle was dedicated in 1934.
The first of its impressive build-
ings, built twenty years ago, is the
Lawyers Club Building, containing
dormitory accomodations, dining
hall, lounges and recreational fa-
cilities. The John P. Cook Building,
named in honor of the father of Wil-
liam Cook, '82L, was completed six
years later and also serves as a
dormitory.
The William W. Cook Legal Re-
search Library, containing close to
250,000 books and whose spacious
reading room alone can accomodate
500 people, was opened the follow-
ing year.
In 1933, Hutchins Hall, adminis-
trative unit of the Quadrangle, con-
taining lecture and seminar rooms,
professional offices, practice court-
room, study hall, library for faculty
and the offices to two student law
publications, was opened completing
the construction of the Law Quad-
rangle.
Aside from his gift of the Quad-
rangle as a new home for the Michi-
gan Law School, William W. Cook,
established a large endowment fund
to be used for the promotion of ad-

vanced legal research, the mainten-
ance of the library and to attract the
best available men to the Law School
faculty.
Health Service
In 36th Year
In 36 years of serving University
students, the Health Service has ex-
panded from a small residence on
the spot where Burton Memorial
Towar stands now to the modern
50-bed building on Fletcher.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, head of
the Health Service now, was on the
original eight man staff and has
watched medical service to students
grow until it now includes almost all
the fields of specialization under a
staff of almost 100 people.
Another member of the original
staff who is still in Ann Arbor is
Dr. Howard H. Cummings, who was
first director and is now chairman of
the Department of Postgraduate
Medicine.
The Health Service was first cre-
ated as an independent unit. In 1921
when it was moved to the building
that is now the Museum annex, it
was included in the division of Hy-
giene and Public Health. At that
time it included all physical educa-
tion work, intramural sports and
hygiene and public health teaching.
In 1941, following the establishment
of the School of Public Health, it
was made a separate unit again.

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