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June 12, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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- IL

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 1946

PA G E EIG T W E NES A Y, JU N E 12, 194

Rioting Breaks Out in Italy
As Umberto Fails To Leave
Monarchists and Republicais (lash im
Rome, Naples; King's Ouster Wanted
W4

By The Associated Press
ROME, June 11-At least four per-
sons were killed and 50 injured to-
night in a heavy gun battle in Naples
between monarchist demonstrators
and troops, while in Rome almost
100,000 angry pro-Republicans
marched on Viminale palace, de-
manding cabinet action to force King
Umberto II into exile.
A pitched battle raged for hours
in Naples' Via Medina, with both
police and monarchists using auto-
matic weapons and motor transport.
Communist Headquarters Attacked
The surging crowd of from 10,000
to 20,000 laid siege to Communist
headquarters, adjacent to the police
building, and hurled Molotov cock-
tails - bottled gasoline with flaming
wicks - at the six story building in
a determined effort to destroy it.
Smaller battles broke out in several
other sections of the city.
Two bombs were thrown into the
crowd from the Communist build-
ing. An eye-witness account said,
"And all hell broke loose." The
Communists, barricaded in their
building, were returning fire from
other buildings in blockaded Via Me-
dina, and late tonight the fighting
still was in progress.
Republic Not Proclaimed
The demonstration in Rome was
Crane To Talk
To Architects
Awards To Be Made
For Outstanding Work
C. Howard Crane, American archi-
tect who has spent the last ten years
doing extensive architectural work
in London will address the Detroit
chapter of the American Institute of
Architecture at its last dinner meet-
ing of the season at 4 p.m. Monday in
the Union.
Crane is making a scheduled tour'
of the country in an effort to obtain
information which will aid in the re-
building of devastated English cities.
The Chapter's Student Award of
seventy-five dollars will be presented
to a sophomore who has done "prom-
ising work" by Clair W. Ditchey,
president of the Detroit Chapter. Al-
pha Rho Chi, honorary architecture
fraternity, will present the Institute
of Architecture Medal and, the In-
stitute of ArchitectdBook Award to
two seniors for outstanding leader-
ship and scholarship.

called to express impatience with the
government for failing to proclaim
the Republic on this day set aside
as a holiday to celebrate it.
The cabinet, in its fourth session
in Viminale palace, failed again late
tonight to find a solution to King
Umberto's refusal to leave the country
and make way for the Republic.
"The situation is the same as it
has been all day," Action Party Min-
ister Alberto Cianca announced after
the fourth session. King Umberto.
meanwhile, sat tight in the royal
palace, conferring with his counselors
and insisting that the result of the
plebiscite was "indefinite."
Lecture Series
For Summer
is Announced
Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the
political science department, and
Prof. H. R. Crane of the physics de-
partment will open the annual Sum-
mer Session lecture series Thursday,
July 11.
Theme of the series will be "Social
Implications of Modern Science."
Prof. Harold Dorr, chairman of the
committee arranging the lecture ser-
ies has also announced that Prof.
Ralph Barton Perry of the philosophy
department of Harvard University
will speak on Friday, July 12, and
that Prof. Herbert Briggs of the poli-
tical science department of Cornell
University will speak on Tuesday,
July 16.
Announcement of the complete
schedule of lectures will be made
later after confirmation has been re-
ceived from each of the speakers.
There will be 20 lectures, starting
July 11 and continuing through mid-
August.
North Main Opposite Court House
--- STARTS TODAY-
Lloyd Nolan in
"HOUSE ON 92nd ST."
and --
"UNDER ARIZONA SKIES"
NEWS and SERIAL

Rea Advises
Officers Close
Club Accounts
Trea umier of student organiza-
tions were urged yesterday by Dean
of Students Walter B. Rea to conclude
their yearly accounts with him as
soon as possible before leaving the
campus.
Anything pertaining to the organi-
zat ion's financial affairs, such as un-
deposited cash or unpaid bills, should
be brought in, Dean Rea said.
He also urged retiring officers of
student organizations to turn in the
names of their successors.
Union Appoints Newv
Council Members
New appointments to the Union
Executive Council announced yes-
terday include Richard Cortright,
Arthur DerDerian, Alan Farns-
worth, Kenneth Massey, and George
Shaffer.
Those re-appointed by :Richard
Roeder, pre, ident, and Henry Horldt,
secretary, are Jerry Coiner, Harley
Fortier, Andrew Poledor, Milan Mis-
covsky, and Eugene Sikorovsky. Com-
mittee appointments will be an-
nounced later.

Three classifications of students
will be exempted from University
automobile restriction, during the
summer session unde reulations an-
nounced yesterday by Assit Dean
of Students Walter TB. IRca.
The three exempted classifica-
tions are professional people doing
advanced work here, part-time stu-
dents paying a reduced fee and stu-
dents 26 years of age and over.
Students holding driving "permits"
will be granted use of their cars for,
recreational purposes upon renewal
of the permit for the summer session.,
Driving restrictions for tile current
semester will be lifted at 12 noon
June 19 and restrictions for the sum-
mer session will become effect ive at
8 a.m. July 1.
The complete summer ses ion auto-
mobile regulations follow:
Students in the 1946 summer ses-
sion who, during the preceding aca-
demic year were not enrolled as stu-
dents here or elsewhere but were
engaged in professional pursuits-
such as teaching, law, medicine, den-

f ist ry and nursing- will be granted
unrestricted use of their cars.
TIwo other classifications of sum-
mecr stuldents will not be required to
obserrve the automobile regulation:
those who have registered as part-
time students and have paid a re-
duced fee and those who are 26 years
of age or over.
In order to secure exemption privi-
leges, the professional group need
only provide the information re-
quested on the section of the registra-
tion carddevoted to the use of au-
t omobilel- -- namely, their occupa-
t ion during the previous school year
aind the snake, type and license num-
ber' of the car to be driven.
Regular students who are 26 years
of age or over or who take part-time
Work will be required to apply for
e dexemption at the Office of the Dean
of Students on or before July 1.
Students who hold driving permits
issued during the current academic
year may renew these permits for the
summer session in the Office of the
Dean of Students.

TO RELAX BAN JUNE 19:
Summer Driving Rules Announced

In addition to present driving priv-i-
leges, recreational utse of cars will
be available to these permwit holders
but will be limited to t ranisporta t in
fo ud o t ltc r c e tosengers may be carried for part ici-
pation in these activities but, mixed
company in a car will not be perm it-
ted after 9 p.m. (except in cars driven
by married students or those w ith
health permits.)
Students seeking- driving ;permits,
for the first time may aply egn
ning June 27. Applications must bew
accompanied by evidence of proprty
damage and liability insurance poli-
cies on the car. Applicants who ayre
under 21 or are financially depen-
dent on their parents will be requttired
to present a 'letter of parent:;' con-
sent.
Back the
Famine Drive

TO DIRECT FRESH AIR CAMP-
William C. Morse, lecturer in the
Adult Education Program, will be
in charge of the University's camp
on Patterson Lake which annually
provides a place of recreation for
underprivileged children.
To Present Annual Exhibit
The College of Architecture will
present its annual exhibit of land-
scape architecture plans, design,
painting, ceramics, and weaving next
week. The exhibit will be on dis-

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