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June 09, 1946 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-09

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SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ImArlir w*%rvw

.w M E Mr . L H I.,Al. NF'T n11I lAIT Y.

AUE £SEVEN

Hopwood Contests Offer Largest Opptmity Mihigan Vets'ohlle Will
Anywhere for Awards to Young Writers B 1ay BC Be Site C New
Far in Future Mental loiita

FIRST TIME SINCE '42:
Literary College Will Offer
Honors Program to Juniors

1l

By CINDY REAGAN
Nowhere else in the world does
a university offer such large prizes
in the field of composition as does
the University's annual Avery and
Jule Hopwood contest in creative
writing, whose winners for the year
of 1945-46 will be announced after the
Hopwood lecture Tuesday.
Hopwood was a prominent Ameri-
can dramatist and a member of
the class of 1905 of the University.
In his will made in 1922 one-fifth
of his estate was set aside and given
to the Regents of the University for
the encouragement of creative work
in writing. During the 14 years the
awards have been given, they have
amounted to $8,500 a year.
Hopwood emphasized in the be-
quest that the students com-
peting for the prizes should not
be confined to academic subjects,
but should be allowed the widest
possible range, and that the new,
the unusual and the radical should
be encouraged.
1 __

As the rules for eligibility now
stand, a student from any school of
the University may compete, pro-
viding he is taking a course in Eng-
lish composition in either the Eng-
lish or journalism departments.
On the death of Mr. Hopwood ip
1928 and the acceptance of his be-
quest by the Regents the problem
of the wise use of the money arose.
Therefore, at a meeting held in Sep-
tember, 1930, the Regents approved
certain regulations governing the dis-
tribution of the money. These were
that the bequest be split into two
parts, known as the major and minor
awards.
The major awards are open to sen-
ior and graduate students, but all
undergraduate students are eligible
for the minor awards if they meet
the general eligibility conditions. The
first contest was held in 1930-31.
In 1932 the comrmittee announced
special contests for freshman stu-
dents only and established prizes of
$50, $30, and $20 in each of three

fields of writing: essay, narrative and
poetry.
In the summer of 1938, additional
contests for students of the summer#
session were announced with prizes1
of $75 ind $50 offered in four fields
of writing.
Since the inauguration of the
contests in 1931, and aside from
many smaller prizes given, 43
prizes of over s1,009 each have beenj
been awarded, two of them being
of $2,500.

I

Four Gubernatorial
(audidacs ill FaVor
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, June 9-That gold dis-
charge button on a Michigan veter-
an's lapel is being made to look these,
ays like a certified check.
But don't try to cash it right away.
There is every surface indicationj
that a veterans' bonus may be forth-'
coming in Michigan eventually, butI

FOR DAD -4?
ON HIS DAY
EXCLUSIVE?
ATS
, 'MADEMOISELLE

i

Judges of distinguished ability to cis payment may be a year or more
rank and evaluate the manuscripts away.
(41 of which have been submitted Four of the six candidates for gov-
in this year's contests) are chosen ernor favor a cash bonus for Michi-
beforehand, but the final determina- gan's ex-soldiers; a fifth is non-
tion of awards is made by the Hop- commital; and only one is opposed.
wood Committee whose chairman is The State Legislature must makeI
Dean Hayward Keniston and which the final decision, probably subject
is directed by Prof. R. W. Cowden. to the approval of the voters.
Included in the committee are Pro- Most impatient of the various poli-
fessors A. L. Bader, L. I. Bredvold, ticians is State Senator George H.
Bennett Weaver, C. F. Wells of the Higgins, a Republican candidate for
English department; Prof. J. L. lieutenant governor. He wants a
Brumm of the journalism depart- special legislative session this summer
ment and Prof. D. H. Parker of the to place the bonus proposal on next
philosophy department. November's ballot.
Since the inception of the Hop- However, Governor Harry Kelly
wood Awards, 29 prize-winning has expressed opposition to such haste
manuscripts have been accepted for and indicated he will not call a spec-
publication. ial session.
Vernon J. Brown, GOP aspirant
In conjunction with the announce- for governor and an old hand in Lan-
ment of the winning manuscripts, sing, said in Detroit recently that
each spring, the annual Hopwood it will probably be at least a year
lecture is presented.EPast speakers before any bonus act may be con-
have included Max Eastman, Zona summated.
Gale,,Christopher Morley, Carl Van Another Republican primary cand-
Struthers Burt. idate, Raymond J. Kelly, one of the
first bonus advocates, contends it
This spring Dean Harlan Hatcher can be paid without a vote of the
of the literary college of Ohio State people. However, Kim Sigler, Re-
University has been asked to speak publican primary candidate for gov-
at the Hopwood Lecture Tuesday. ernor, took issue with Kelly's state-
ment, contending in an address last
S t nnnight that a state constitutional
amendment will be required.
LIV) 11re S-^^^^^^ ---
Quarters FOR SUMMER
The current shortage of construc-

DETROIT, June 9Je -' --Prodded For the first time since 1942, the
by a growing shorlare of space, the literary college will offer an Honors
state of Michigan is prep::ring to em- Program next fall to iuniors who have
bark on 11,i i": um Cr mental hos- a "B" average and who have com-
pital Construction program in 15 pleted their group requirements.
yearsi- This concentration program con-
Sitae flalsr lot e k oved sists of five elective hours, five hours
pl f a to $15,- prescribed by a tutor and five hours
000,000 Ncrthle tlate Hospial, 20 of group discussions and conferences
miles from down town Detroit. jwith the tutor-a total of fifteen
The State Department of Mental hours for each semester of the junior
Health estima;es that 1,200 patients and senior years.
are now awaiting admittance to According to Prof. S. D. Dodge, who
Michigan's ovcrerowdcd mental in- !is in charge of the program, it pro-
stitutions. In addition, an undeter- vides a chance to fulfill require-
mined number have not applied for ments for concentration without hav-
treatment because of the imposM ibil- ing to take courses which are narrow-
ity of obtaining admission to state i ly specialized."
hospitals. "It is designed for thoughtful stu-
The last major institution erected -
in the state was at Ypsilanti, where
the mental hospital was begun in HOLD THOSE
1931. It i; only now nearing comple-
tion.
The first step in the Northville pro-
gram calls for erection of an admin-
istrative center, housing 770 patients.
To complete it and ready it for oc-
cupancy will cost an estimated $4,-
G00,000.
The legislature has appropriated
$8,820,000 for additional hospital
space for mental patients, of which
about $3,500,000 has been tentatively
earmarked for a beginning at North-1
Ville.

'A WT AR BONDS!

WAR BONDS!

3
a
a
5

dents who can rise above the ordin-
ary lecture-examination system pre-
vailing in many courses and affords
the student a chance for individual
work in his own particular field."
The program will offer needed con-
tinuity from course to course and
department to department, declares
Prof. Dodge, by including books that
deal with similar ideas in one field.
Authors whos works will be included
in the program are Homer, Plato,
Aristotle, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Locke,
Hume and Dewey.
Sophomores who have a "B" aver-
age and are interested in the Honors
Program should see Prof. Dodge in
Rm. 17 Angell Hall from 1 to 2:30
p.m.

I

Perci al Price Will
Give Song PItgrant
Percival Price, University carillon-
neur, will present a program of songs
at 3:00 p.m. today.
The recital will include three num-
bers by J. S. Bach, a group of selec-
tions from "The Marriage of Figaro"
by Mozart, and will conclude with
five folk songs.'
-- - -- I

I1

'Nuff said . .
paiper him N
- the kind of
he-man cologne
he likes -8.50
(plus tax)

Nith

tion materials has not been an ob-
stacle in the building of new quarters
for the faculty at the University's
'Biological Station in northern Michi-
gan.
Now under construction, the new
house will be an addition to "Facul-
ty Row," and in all probability will be
ready for occupancy during the sum-
mer session, according to Dr. Alfred
H. Stockard, Director of the sta-
tion.
Log Cabin Type
Built in most part from timber lo-
cated on the grounds, the addition
will be a split-log construction, so
that the exterior will resemble a
log cabin. There is a saw-mill at the
station, and labor power is provided
by farmers and other residents of the
vicinity.
Materials for roofing and plumb-
ing did prove to be somewhat of a
problem, but it has been overcome,
and the house is very near to com-
pletion.
The Biological Station, whose pur-
pose is to give instruction and con-
duct research in botany and zoology,
wil have an enrollment of 130 stu-
dents during the coming 38th ses-
sion, which will last from June 24th
until August 17th.
New Faculty Members
New faculty members on the staff
will include Dr. Alexander H. Smith
of the botany department, Prof. S.
C. Kendeigh of the zoology depart-
ment of the University of Illinois,1
and Prof. G. S. Otto of the zoology
department of Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity.
Besides having more than the usual
number of people at the station this
year, there is a large amount of equip-
ment and materials which has ac-
cumulated over a period of years, and
there is a shortage of laboratory and
storage space.

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