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June 02, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-02

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PAGE EIGHT

THE lICHICAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 94E

' 'Finglub Attracts large Group of Stu.

dents

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FRAN hAMILTON getting into a plane preparatiry to a flight. Flying Club members go through the reg-
ular flyer's routine, including ;┬░olos. GROIND SCHOOL INSTRUJCTOR Bill Fuchs (upper left), one of the
board of directors, instructing a representative group of the lniver-

sits Flying Club.

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Picnics and supper-meetings will
highlight the activities of student re-
ligious grouips tod)cay.
The CONG REG ATIONAL-DISCIP-
LES GUILD will hold a picnic sup-
per today. Members will meet at. 5:00
p.m. at the Guild House.
The ROGE! WILL1AMS GUIL)
will hold a supper-meeting at 6:00
p.m. in the gairden of the Baptist
Negro Coiinil
Asks UNIRelef -
DemaInds Freedom,
Equality in America
DETROIT, June 1 - ()- In a de-
mand for "full freedom and absolute
equality," the National Negro Con-
gress today petitioned the United
Nations to bring "relief from oppres-
sion" to 13,000,000 members of the
race in the United States.
The highlight of the congress' 10th
anniversary convention was a letter
to Secretary General Trygve Lie of
the UN requesting action under Ar-
ticle 71 of the Charter.
The article permits minorities to
ask assistance to prevent discrimina-
tion "on ground of peace."
Letter Not Received
In New York, a spokesman for Lie
issued the following statement:
"No such communication has yet
come to Mr. Lie's attention. If such
a communication is received it will,
of course, be acknowledged and stud-
ied to determine what consideration,
if .any, the United Nations may ap-
propriately give to it under provis-
ions of the Charter.
The 1,000 delegates to the con-I
gress, representing Negro organiza-
tions throughout the nation, are
scheduled to adjourn Sunday follow-
ing election of officers.
The petition to the UN was ap-
proved by the congress' executive
board, unanimously adopted by the
convention and signed by Dr. Max
Yergan, president.
Negroes Enslaved
Dr. Ilerbert Apetheker, in an eight
page documented brief supporting
the petition, told the UN that "the
Negro people, for themselves and for
the benefit of all other inhabitants
of America, demand full freedom and
absolute equality. Nothing short of
this will satisfy them. When one is
enslaved, all are in chains."
Employiiienit R~l

Guild ll ou--. Mrs. Ann igge will
lead the worship service on "God
and Nature."
Parents will be guests of honor1
at a supper-ettking at 5:15 p.m. oft
( *AMM A DEIl/A, the Luthberan stu-
* *~ ~
Thll WIESTMINliSTER GUILD
will meet at 6:00 p.m. at the Pres-z
byterian social hall for a cost sup-t
lier and discussion by the Rev.
James Van Pernis on the "Christ
iaA View of Marriage." This is the
last talk of the series.
The UNITARIAN STUDENT
GROU' will hold its final meeting
at 5:30 p.m. today. Members will
meet at Lane Hall for a chicken din-
ner at the Island. Bicycles should
be brought if available.
* .:
Prof. Lobanov - Rnstovsky will
speak on "Tihe Eastern Orthodox
Church" at a meeting ofrDELTA1
I EPSILON P1. Members will meet1
at 5::0 m. today at Lane hall
Upper Room.
A communion breakfast will be held
by the NEWMAN CLUB next Sun-
day at 11:00 a.in. at St. Mary's
Chapel.
The breakfast will be the final
event of the Newman Club for the
present school term. Edward Mc-
Donald, editor of Tue Michigan Cath-
olic and singer Gloria Gonan will be
featured on the program. Tom Don-
nelly, president of the chub, will be
master of ceremonies. Ticket sale
starts today
Prof. Lichard J. Portr- of the de-
partin' at of tropical diseases will
d i :,cuss in erht ional cooperation
amna scientists at an open meet-
in, of the Association of Univer-
sity S"ienl ists at 3 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
A discussion of the United Na-
tions Education, Scientific and Cul-
tural organization will be featured.
Plans for summer activities of the
association and the tatus of con-
gressional legislation are also on the
agenda.
-' '

Garg T o Strike
Cairnc ampus
AguiThursday~
There can be no doubt about it. The
Gargoyle will strike a hopelessly un-
prepared campus again Thursday.
Official University sources, reluc-
tant to admit defeat, announced late
yesterday that co-operative efforts
vwith the post office department to
negotiate a peaceful out-of-print
e ttlement witli the Garg staff had,
collapsed. No new developments iii
the 27-year-old publication contro-
versy seem forthcoming, and the
Garg now appears inevitable.
The University, on the watch for
new trends, has tried to salvage some
prestige from the wreckage. A new
resolution before the school Senate
would put the Garg in the curricul-
um of the School of Education, im-
plying that its material is of an edu-
cational nature.
This is a fallacious notion, since
an economics department survey ha:
indicated that there is nothing in the
Gargoyle that students shouldr, '
have known before coming to college.
Whether the Garg will ever replace
It So Happens has not yet been de-
termined.
The June issue of the Gargovlc
represents the final spasm of tlh
brotherhood headed by Joe Alvanley
Walker, soon to be released from his
presidency.
)eice- Sos Files

MSC Hold TA
atty Meet Here
Thirteen members of the Michigan
State Flying; Club, the "Winged Spar-
t.ns," were present at the "A" Day
Mret held yesterdvay at the Ann Ar-
bor airport by tfw Michigan Flying
Club.
Tw v;;o;rot Iannding contests were the
main ait actions of the afternoon.
The winner of tie student pilots' con-
test was Robert M. Lamb, U. of M.,
with a tie for second between Jeoff
Hlowes and Al DI:nkle, both from
Michigan State.
Everett Robb, U. of M., was the
winncr of the private and commer-
cial pilots' contest, with Paul Han-
son, U. of M., and Perce Osler, M.S.C.,
tied fcr second. Booby prizes were
won by Katherine Keegan, M.S.C.,
and Ann Coe, U. of M. The bombing
contest and exhibitions of aerobatics
and gliding were called off because of
inclement weather.
in Lhe evening a tu rkey dinner ban-
quet was held at one of the down-
to\n hotels, during which prizes of
dark glasses, calculators, and a cer-
tificate for nylons were awarded to
the winners of the contest and those
makirt h the biggest flying boners of
the year. A discussion of the history
of both clubs climaxed the day.
ea>(ICe f m Yelling 'Heil'

STANDING BESIDE one of the club's three planes is Don Snyder,
first member of the organization to obtain a private pilot's license.

CLUB PRESIDENT Warren H.
Curry. He's a graduate student in
the Department of Aeronautical
Engineering.
Dawn Patrol Flies Today
The six members of the Michigan
Flying Club who will fly to Battle
Creek today on the second Dawn
Patrol are Warren Curry, president,
Fran Hamilton, secretary, Andy An-
derson, Dean Miars, Garrett Donner,
and George Hoyt.

PICTURED above are Deane Miars, left, and Fran
of the Club. He's signing up for flying time.

Hamilton, secretary

i

CHICAGO, June 1 -Pi')-- A newly
developed machine system for mass : DETROIT, June 11!P)--German-
sorting of dental records has been born heindrich A. Linder, 43, who
proposed to the War Department for gave the Nazi salute and yelled
possible use in identifying Amei- "Heil" at the Memorial Day Parade
ca's unknown dead of World War II, here, was convicted today of a charge

/(psiltmmerhimc Zt!

the Journal of the American Medical
Association reported today.
The system was developed by Dr.
Lloyd G. Welty, former lieutenant
colonel in the Army Dental Corps,
and Randall R. Glasgow, former Med-
ical Administrative Corps captain,
both of San Francisco.

of disturbing the peace.
Linder, who said he came to the
United States through Canada from
Germany in 1924, was referred by Re-
corder's Judge Arthur E. Gordon to
the court's psychiatric clinic pending
sentence June 7. He was freed on $300
bond.

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DETROIT, June 1 - .UPEmploy-
ment in Michigan will be 25 per cent
greater than the 1940 level by the
end of this year or early in 1947, the
United States Employment Service
said today. The estimate is based on
labor market information fromI
Michigan's 70 local USES employ-
ment offices.

Just Received!
SHEAFFER PENS
and a few
ELECTRIC RAZORS
Ulricha's
Ann Arbor's Busy Bookstore

the prettiest color
you can put on your lips
BY PRINCE MATCHABELLI
No two ways about it.
Pretty Pink has infinite charm .
it's natural but not naive, dramatic
but not artificial . . . it's the perfect
accent for navy, for grey,
for flowery hats. Have the entire T
Pretty Pink make-up sequence
and see how much prettier
you can be! Scented with the
sweet, fresh fragrance
of lilacs. Pretty Pink
Lipstick, 1.00.
Use with. Pretty Pink face Pow
Pr:etty'[ink Camne R(
Rose Rachell eoun
Iouchess Blue I ye S

-
Nder, 1.50
Rouge=, 1.00
dadon I c17
>adow, L.0

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7

PLAY CLOTHES that are von-
derf ulfor fun at the beach, Per-
feet for sunba/hiing and other
gOOdI times under o d 'so riys.
from $10.95
i
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i VIII

2OU 4 , IL/-'"""'
CHRISTIANITY is and by its very nature wants to be a
minority faith. As such it has been the world's greatest
advocate of toleration. But become, theoretically at least, the
religion of the majority it has been the world's worst offender
against toleration.
HISTORY bears this out everywhere. Early Protestant-
ism in the Low Countries, for example, has some marvelous
toleration literature to its credit; but no sooner had it become,
in 1566, theoretically again, the religion of the majority but

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SHORTS and SHIRTS for a cool
appearance ou warm summer days,
be it a game of tennis or a picnic,
they are just the thing!
Tea Shirts from $2.25
Shorts from $3.50

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