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June 01, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-06-01

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SAIITR )AY, JUNE 1, 1346

PA01 FOUR SATURDAY, JuNE 1, 194~

BUREAU OF GOVERNMENT:_
Projects To Be Adapted for
Public Administration Students

Research projects in the Univer-
sity Bureau of Government will in
the future be adapted in part to
the needs of students in the new In-
stitute of Public Administration who
choose to spend their one semester
internship working in the Bureau,
according to Prof. John A. Perkins,
secretary of the Institute, and Prof.
Robert Ford, director of the Bureau.
The Institute, which will start this
summer, will offer a 36-hour grad-
uate curriculum leading to the de-
Artists To Show
Work for Sale
Proceeds Will Help
Famine Relief Drive
The Ann Arbor Artists for Famine
Relief will present an exhibit of art
works Thursday through Sunday of
next week at Lane Hall.
All contributions, including pic-
tures, crafts, ceramics and sculpture,
will be offered for sale and the pro-
ceeds will go to help alleviate star-
vation abroad. The show will begin
with a reception at 8 p.m. Thursday
at Lane Hall, to which the public is
invited and at which sales will begin.
The exhibit is being planned in
cooperation with the Famine Emer-
gency Committee of Ann Arbor and
the Student Famine Emergency Com-
mittee of the University.
Delta Epsilon Pi Meeting
Delta Epsilon Pi members will at-
fend a program given by the Wayne
University group at 7:00 p.m. today
at the MacKenzie Union in Detroit.

gree of Master of Public Administra-
tion. Included in the degree require-
ments will be a one semester intern-
ship in a state or local government
agency or in the Bureau of Govern-
ment, and a report on some admin-
istrative problem.
"Tailor-Made" Projects
The projects the students will work'
on will be planned here, and will be,
according to Prof. Ford, "tailor-
made" for the individual student's
interests and capacities. If the "in-
terns" choose to do their field work
in the Bureau, they may do research
projects especially designed for them
or take part in projects already be-
ing carried on there.
City Manager Cities
Because Michigan leads the nation
in the number of city manager cities,
with a total of 58 (Maine runs a close
second with 57), it is probable that
many of the field projects will be re-
lated to the managerial and adminis-
trative problems of these cities, ac-
cording to Prof. Perkins.
Another research project in which
the public administration students
may take part is a survey of the
Grand Rapids area in regard to gov-
ernment and the tax situation, which
is being made in cooperation with a
Bureau of Business Research study
of business and economics in the
same area.
Work in Government Agencies
If the students choose to work in
a state or local government agency
the Institute will attempt to find an
agency appropriate to their interest,
and in conjunction with the agency
supervise their work there.
Among other projects at present
being carried on in the Bureau of
Government are a pamphlet on the
reorganization of county government
in Michigan, a study of the present
tax situation, and "A Manual of
Township Administrative Organiza-
tion in Michigan", a companion to
similar volumes on state and county
administration.
1FC Wants Pledge Lists
All campus fraternities must
turn in pledge lists and fees for
men pledged during informal
rushing, May 8 to June 3, by 5
p.m. Monday at the Interfratern-
ity Council Office in the Union.

Qlhio State Deiti
Will Present
Hopwood Talk
Dean Harlan Hatcher of the liberal
arts college of Ohio State University,
will give the annual Hopwood Lecture'
at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 11 in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, Prof. Roy Cowden,
director of the Hopwood Committee
announced yesterday.
Winners of the annual Avery and
Jule Hopwood contests will be an-
nounced after the lecture, Prof. Cow-
den said.
Dean Hatcher is the author of
numerous books including "Tunnel
Hall," "Creating the Modern Ameri-
can Novel," and "The Versification of
Robert Browning." He also wrote
"Lake Erie" which is one of the
five volumes in the "American Lake
Series."
Dean Hatcher received his educa-
tion at Ohio State University and
the University of Chicago, and did
post doctoral work abroad.
U Flying Club Will
Hold 'A' Day Meet
The Michigan Flying Club will
hold its "A" Day Meet at 2 p.m. to-
day at the airport with the "Winged
Spartans" from Michigan State Col-
lege and the members of the Wayne
Flying Club as guests.
Spot landing and bombing contests
will be highlighted in the meet, fol-
lowed by exhibitions of aeronautics
and gliding. The public is cordially
invited.

Prof. Porter
To Talk Before,
t'U' Scientists
Dr. Richard J. Porter. assistant
professor of protozoology will pre-
sent an outline of international co-
operation among scientists at an open
meeting of the Association of Univer-
sity of Michigan Scientists at 8 p.m.
Monday in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
A member of the department of
tropical diseases, Dr. Porter will dis-
cuss recent moves to stimulate world-
wide scientific correspondence.
A discussion of the United Na-
tions Education, Scientific and Cul-
tural Organization will be featured.
Plans for summer activities of the
association and the status of con-
gressional legislation are also on the
agenda,
Korean iAl uirni
Club Reborn
The University of Michigan Club
of Seoul, Korea, has been reorgan-
ized, according to a letter received
by T. Hawley Tapping, general sec-
retary of the Alumni Association,
from Capt. G. M. Hughes. University
alumnus now serving with the AMG
department of finance in Korea.
Closed by the Japanese in 1935,
the club has been reorganized by ten
Korean alumni of the University
and three American officers sta-
tioned in Korea.

tl U.111 ,l l A 7 x j
1

*

Youth Tstel Trip . . *
at
The American Youth Hostels. Inc..,
will sponsor a canoe trip at 2:30 p.m.,
today under the leadership of Stan b
Saulson.
Those persons desiring to take the
trip are asked to bring $2.50 for
canoe rental either to the group meet-
ing at 2:15 p.m. at Lane Hall or
at 2:30 at the boat house. Reser-
vations may be made with Nancy t
Smith, telephone 7211.
n
*0iltil( * * I(P
IT
(aoini ittee To Meet . . . 5
The decoration committee for
Senior Ball will meet at 3:30 p.m.
Monday at the Union. Men are
needed to assist the committee and
anyone interested who cannot at-
tend the meeting should contact.
Cam Fisher at 2-2591.
Iite b.ige Meeting .. .
Canterbury Club members will at-
tend an annual conference at Pine
Lake this weekend.
The theme will be "Personal Re-
ligion: What a Churchman Should
Know and Do". Discussions will be
led by the Rev. Lawrence Pearson,
Protestant Chaplain at the Univer-
sity Hospital, assisted by the Rev.
Walter Young, Chaplain of Cranbrook
School.
SJA Bianiquet Today , . .
The Student Religious Associa-
tion will hold its annual installa-
tion banquet at 6:30 p.m. today
at Lane Hall. The Arnold Schiff
Memorial Award and an award
from the B'nai B'rith Councils of
Michigan will be presented.
Westminster Party .. .
Westminster Guild will hold a
' swimming party and picnic at Whit-

LL 1.E._i." H Horace A. Tollefson. former act
tom' ing circulation librarian of the Gen-k
- --o ral Library, has becin appoinz ed
nore Lake today. Members will meet librarian of Rollins College, Winter
it the Presbyterian church A 2:00 Park, Fla., President Hamilton Holt,
announced.
.m . In case of rain, the picnic will..
e held at the social hall. :><;:::osa m <s:os::os
* * *
Initarian Picnic. .Diamonds
The Unitarian Student Oroup will
hold its final meeting t 5:30 p.m.
omorrow. Members will assemble in T'E RINGS
ront of Lane Hall for a chicken din- o
ner picnic at the Island. Reservations
may be made by calling Tom Walsh, 717 North University Ave.
5989. -> - <- -- -- < >

[E7~tmriii~ T-BcrhBahlj

Fo rmer 'U' Librarian
Rce~ive-s New 1'oitimi

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

a

YELLOW CAB
BAGGAGE and
TRANSFER
Authorized Railway Transfer
Phone 4244

Il

Telephone 3008 We Deliver!
Open 11 :00 a.m. to 1 :00 a.m.
2 x4 LUNCH

Featuring Box Chicken

50c

HAMBURGS

" HOT DOGS
GOOD COFFEE

0 BARL-1-Q's

I

1319 South University Ave., Ann Arbor

(Continued from Page 3)
been Albert Luconi and Russell How-
land. The public is cordially invited.
University of Michigan Women's
Glee Club, Marguerite V. Hood, Con-
ductor, will present its annual spring
concert at 8:30 Thursday evening,
June 6, in Hill Auditorium.
The first half of the program will
consist of compositions by Brahms,
Rachmaninoff, Rossini, Kernochan,
Wood, and Hageman, while the sec-
ond half, entitled "Latin-American
Fiesta", will feature appropriate mu-
sic. It will be open to the general
public without charge.
Events Today
Members AIEE: The AIEE will
hold a picnic today at Portage Lake.
There will be entertainment for
everyone. Refreshments will be serv-
ed. Transportation will be furnished
by the EE faculty and those attend-
ing the picnic should plan to leave
from the parking lot behind the
power lab at 12:45 p.m.
Coming Events
The Graduate Council will meet
Monday, June 3, in the East Lecture
Room of Rackham at 7:30 p.m. At
this time officers of the council will
be elected and the presence of all
members of the council is requested.
Modern Russia, the second in a
series of area studies, sponsored by
the Veterans International Student
Exchange Committee and the Rus-
sian Circle, will be presented at 7:30
p.m., Monday in Kellogg Auditorium.
A Russian film "A Day in Russia"
narrated by Quentin Reynolds will
be shown. Dr. Kiss, Prof. Shepard
and Prof. Lobanov will give short
talks dealing with Russia. The pub-
lic is cordially invited.
Hindustan Association:
Spring Meeting at 7:30 p.m. on
June 2 at Lane Hall. The program
includes formation of a committee
for the forthcoming Detroit per-,
formance. Secretary's and treasurer's
reports, solo dances and songs. Mem-
bers and their American friends are
cordially invited to attend.
Unitarian iStudent Group Outing,
Sunday, 5:30 p.m. Meet at Lane Hall

with bicycles, if possible, but come
anyway. Reservations should be made
Saturday by calling 3085,
Veterans' Wives' Club will meet
at 7:30 p.m., Monday, June 3, in the
Michigan League. There will be elec-
tion of officers for next term, and
a social hour. All wives of student
veterans are cordially invited.
The Lutheran Student Association
is having its outing known as the
Little Ashram this weekend at Camp
Birkett on Silver Lake so there will
be no regular Sunday evening meeL-
ing in Ann Arbor. The Sunday morn-
ing Bible Class has also been post-
poned.
PROGRAMS . CARDS. STATIONE&Y
HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NORTH MAM
ATHENS PRESS
HOGAN'S BAGGAGE
Phone 2-1721
TRUNKS, PARCELS
Small Move Jobs
INSURED
FOR SUMMER!
CHAMP STRAW HATS by LaSalle
are a favorite among men. They
corne in straw or panama with black
or colored bands. Prices from $2.50
to $.00.
KUOHN'S
CLOTHES SHOP
122 LAsT LIBERTY

t
J
1
I

MICHIGAN

Shows Continuous Daily
Starting at 2:00-4:17-6:35-9:05
No short subjects shown

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.. ' '

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FOR SUMMER
LOVELINESS...
Have a permanent-
We specialize in all types:
MACHINE
MACHIINELESS
COLD WAVE
$8.50 - $22.50
Also, hair trimmed according to
style desired.

...
11

Observatory Beauty Salon

1402 WASHINGTON HGTS.

Phone 2-3413

L

Al --..

JI

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T

!f

1I

IT'S A1t TREAT
AT ANN ARBOR'S MOST FAMOUS RESTAURANT
s-
Leave your warm weather blues behind
and enjoy a summertime treat at the

b

SEVEN REAS NS
TO STOP AND SHOP
1. Ideally located for Veterans of Willow Run
2. Large parking space
3. Choice meats - plenty of pork, beef, and bacon.
4. Fresh fruits and vegetables
5. Groceries
6. Ice cream and soft drinks
7. Newspapers and magazines
\A /l r- mI-Celn 10 rim n m .~)nily 0 o.m_- n m.

ALLEN EL.

Take advantage also of our

fine taproom.

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