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May 17, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-17

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PAGE SIX
AND T HE LAD1IES, TOO:
VA Expects 7,800 Women
Vets To Return to Schools

THE . M I C HIWAN DAILYSA, M AYf)~ 17, 1946

A/iproxiately 7,800 women voter-
ans of the 50,000 residing in Michi-
gan, Ohio, and Kentucky will return
to school or college according to esti-
mates made by the Veterans Admin-
.Inter uild Will
Hold(1Retrea t
At' Cain p BirkeUt
The annual Interguild Retreat will
be held today, tomorrow and Sunday
at Camp Birkett.
Representatives of the Westminis-
ter, Wesleyan, Congregational-Disci-
ples and Roger Williams Guilds, the
Lutheran Student Association, Gam-
ma Delta and the Evangelical Stu-
dent Chapel will hold discussions on
"The Place of Interguild on the. Cam-
pus", with special emphasis on social
action programs. The discussions will
be held under the direction of Pris-
cilla Hodges, president of Interguild,
and the Rev. Henry Yoder, who will
act as representative of the student
directors.
Prof. Paul Kauper of the Law
School will be the guest speaker dur-
ing a special program tonight, and
Franklin H. Littell, director of the
Student Religious Association, will
speak at the Sunday worship service.
i o e 1 r,
Guild . To Hold
Moonlight Hike
A Moonlight Hike will be held by
Westminister Guild at 8:30 p.m. to-
day. Those attending the party will
meet at 8:30 p.m. in the social hall
of the Presbyterian church and hike
to the Island for a picnic supper.
Club Open Io'use
Canterbury Club will hold open
house from 4 to 6 p.m. today in the
Student Center.
Dean Becomes
Board Member
Dean Ivan C, Crawford of the Col-
lege of Engineering has been appoint-
ed to the national board of judges
and the advisory board of the Fish-
er Craftsman's Guild.
Presidents and deans of some of
the country's outstanding universi-
ties and technical schools are on this
board. Awards totaling over $75,000,
including eight university scholar-
ships, are offered this year to boys
who submit the best model automo-
biles and Napleonic coaches. July
15 is the deadline.

istration, Ralph H. Stone, Deputy Ad-
ministrator for the three state area,
announced yesterday.
National Survey
A national survey of the post-war
plans of enlisted women of the Wom-
en's Army Corps, made by the War
Department. shows that while slight-
ly more than 50 per cent of women
veterans want to continue their edu-
cation, only 15 per cent have made
difinite plans to return to school.
(Women veterans normally com-
pose from two to three per cent of
the total veteran population. There
are an estimated 24,000 women vet-
erans in Ohio, 18,000 in Michigan,
and 8,000 in Kentucky.)
Majority Under 25
Of the group planning to continue
their education in the three states,
the VA estimates that 3,650 will at-
tend school full-time and 4,150 part-
time. Four out of seven are expected
to attend college. The majority of
the college group is 25 years of age
or less, single, and high school grad-
uates with some college education.
The survey shows a decrease in
the number of women veterans re-
turning to the clerical and sales,
semi-skilled and unskilled, and do-
mestic types of work with a corres-
ponding increase in the professional
and managerial fields.
One out of twenty women veterans
in the three states is planning to go
into the beauty shop, restaurant, re-
tail or other types of business for her-
self.
Psychological
Aptitude Tests
Will Continue

FIREMAN DASHES FOR SAFETY AS SMOKESTACK FALLS-A
Champaign, Ill., fireman dashes for safety as a smokestack comes plung-
ing down during a grain and feed mill fire at Farmer City, Il1. Damage
was estimated near $100,000 by II. C. Gring and Raymond McCord,
owners.
CIVIC ORCHESTRA

Sigma Rho Tau
Representatives
Will Convene
Ten members of the local chapter
of Sigma Rho Tau, engineering stump
speakers society, will attend the or-
ganization's national convention to,
be held tomorrow in the Rackham
Building in Detroit.
An inter-collegiate speaking contest
anmong the various colleges who have
chapters in this society will high-
light the convention which is spon-
sored by the Engineering Society of
Detroit. University students who won
first place and alternate honors in
the regular campus contests will par-
ticipate in several different forms
of speaking in the intercollegiate
contest. These forms of speaking
include "Hall of Fame" talks, racon-
teur speaking, impromptu speaking
and project speaking.
The meeting, scheduled to last
from 10 a.m. to well into the even-
ing, will also include numerous elec-
tions and business meetings. Also
scheduled is an informal address by
Philip Adler, Detroit News columnist
who has just returned from Europe,
who will speak at the banquet in the
evening.
The University group will be accom-
panied by Prof. Robert D. Brackett
of the engineering English depart-
ment, sponsor of the local chapter
of Sigma Rho Tau. Students who will
attend include Robert Pollack, Mar-
garet Carroll. Terry Finch, Dean
Woodbury, Fay Ajzenberg, Jane In-
gersoll, Mildred Denecke, Robert
Buckborough, Marvin Shafer, and
Charles Chadwick.
S igma Rho Ta l
Names Pled ges
The following 28 students have
been pledged to Sigma Rho Tau, En-
gineering stump speaking society:
Quentin D. Vandervoort, Charles
Hauptman, Donald S. Barnett, Floyd
P. Ganyard, Eugene S. Long, William
B. Lamb, Robert J. Casey, Louis H.
Sterling, Edward H. van Zylstra,
Robert M. House, Robert W. Dodson,
Thomas W. Graber, Vernon R. Camp-
bell, Werner Blumenthal.
Bresord Arie, Walter Parker, Er-
win K. Johnson, Robert J. Meyers,
Paul H. Jones, Albert E. Anderson II,
Robert J. Taylor, Rudolph G. Swed-
er, Jr., Ray Peterson, Douglas C.
Renud, Jack Queen, Arthur T. Ros-
sing, Alben F. Carlson, and Rudolph
A. Martinak.
Eat Less,
Give What You Save

The Second Annual Russian Night,
sponsored by the Russian Circle and
Russian department, will be held at
8:30 p.m. today in Rackham As-
embly Hall.
The feature of the evening's
program will be a play, "Days of
Our Life," by Andreev. This will be
the first presentation of a play
with Russian dialogue at the Uni-
versity.
Prof. Haber Will
Speak at Hillel
Prof. William Haber, of the eco-
nomics department, will discuss "The
Meaning of the Anglo-American Re-
port on Palestine" at the sabbath
eve services, 7:45 p.m. today in the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
A former member of the War Man-
power Commission and director of the
National Refugee Service, Prof. Ha-
ber is currently one of the directors
of the faculty division of the local
Allied Jewish Appeal.
Services will be conducted by Rab-
bi Jehudah M. Cohen and student
cantors Morris Stulberg and Eugene
Malitz.

Dealing with Russian student life,
the play centers around the impos-
sibilty of an older student's adjust-
ment with a younger group,
The leading roles are held by Ros-
tislav Galuzevski, Henry Milezuk,
Helene Halpern, and Wilma Miron.
Others in the cast include: Edward
Chop, Richard Shapiro, Leona Lan-
dy, Renee Lichtenstein, Martha
Bradshaw, Mary Hapiuk, Marcia Bry,
and Katherine Stasewich.
The program will also in(lud
a skit entitled "The Misfortune,"
Acting in the skit are Otto Reiscl-
er, Leona Landy, Helen Klopper,
and Henry Milezuk. The singing
chorus of Russky Kruzhok, Rus-
sian Circle, will render some Rus-
sian songs, including a few solos
by Joyce Donen. Russian dances
will be performed by Katherine
Stasewich and Lolly Metropolsky
and two poems by famous Russian
authors are to be offered,
A reception will follow the pro-
gram. Tea from the samovar and
Russian delicacies will be served.
Admission is by invitation only.
Those interested may call Renee
Lichtenstein, chairman of the pro-
gram at 9194, or Mrs. Lila Pargment
for tickets.

MEETING AT RACKH AM:
Second Annual Russian Night
To Feature Play by Andreev

chi
th
-ter
tht
chi
let
sel
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Selections from lcllaikOVSk y

Sel
an
.e fl
na
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am
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est
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I

The psychological aptitude

tes

being given by the Bureau of Psycho-
logical Services to help students who
are considering work in a profes-.
sional school will continue next week,
the first general session having tak-
en place yesterday at Rackham Build-
ing.
A test for those interested in medi-
cine and dentistry will be given from
7 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 21. Stu-
dents interested in law may take a
test at the same time on Monday,
May 27, and a test will be given the
following day for those interested in
engineering.
Dr. Wilma T. Donahue, director
of the Bureau of Psychological Ser-
vices, has announced that another
general session will take place on
Saturday, June 1. "Those who have
already had extensive vocational test-
ing need not enroll for the general
sessions," she said. Students plan-
ning to take the tests should notify
the Bureau in advance, Dr. Donahue
emphasized.
State Dietetic
Group To Meet
The University will be represented
by four faculty members at the spring
meeting of the Michigan Dietetic As-
sociation to be held at Battle Creek
today and tomorrow.
Dr. H. B. Lewis, professor of biolog-
ical chemistry, Miss Adelia M. Bee-
uwkes, instructor in public health
nutrition, Anna Reimer of the Uni-
versity Hospital staff, and Lewis Dod-
son, director of public health pract-
ices at the School of Public Health
will address the meeting.
Back the
Famine Drive

Cl
Cli
the E
that,
Mich
need
non-
On
men
650
made
tient
veter
mad
veter
fecti
25 fo
De
durin
spelh
of th
per
from
to 43
durin
incre
most
pend.
sis.
M

To Highlioht Sunday Program
ections from Tchaikovsky's "En- foreign and American students and
ted Lake Ballet" will highlight their guests, will include the follow-
lnal Sunday program of the In- ing selections:
tional Center at 7:30 p.m. ininsecto:
Union BallroomnOverture: "Morning, Noon and Night
in Vienna ............ Von Suppe
e Ann Arbor Civic Orchestra, Straussiana - Melodies of Johann
r the direction of Warren Ket-
, will provide music for the bal- Strauss.............arr. Seredy
and present several orchestral Selections, "Sigurd Jorsalfar Suite"
tions. .......................... G rieg
e program, which is open to all "Two Guitars" ............ Horlick
Melodies from "Maytime" Romberg
nica Record Lyric pieces ............... Grieg
Serenade, "Les Millions D'Arlequin"
.......- ..... Drigo
veals Vets "Orpheus in the Underworld" .... . .
.................... Offenback
.ealthierSelections, "The Enchanted Lake
'e H e lthier Ballet .............Tschaikovsky
fnical tabulation of calls upon University Grand March .. Goldman
Health Service for April indicate-
generally speaking, veterans atS
igan are substantially less in j 17
of Health Service facilities than etyUe c t
veterans. Wil eGie
a rate-per-thousand basis for
in both categories, veterans made
clinic calls, while non-veterans MeC onkey To Speak
998 such calls. Infirmary pa- In Willow Run Series
s numbered 7 veterans, 26 non-
ans. General diagnoses were "Built-in Safety." the foUrth lecture
e for 91 veterans, and 140 non-
an men. Upper respiratory in- in the Red Cross "Safety Series" at
ons numbered 6 for veterans, Willow Run, will be given at 8 p.m.
)r non-veterans. Tuesday in the Village Community
spite sudden changes in weather Building.
ng April and unexpected cold Prof. George M. McConkey of the
s a report covering all students College of Architecture and Design
a, University indicates that up- will speak and answer questions on
resUirityindctnsecthahome building safety measures. Spec-
reirator(anufacls decaeial slideskwill illustrate Prof. McCon-
35 calls in April. Clinical visits
ig April generally showed slight Mrs. Joseph W. Courtis, Red Cross
ase over those in March, the instructor in accident prevention, will
notable occurring for acute ap- discuss furniture arrangements that
icitis and infectious mononucleo- help cut down accident hazards. A
doll house and furniture will be used
to demonstrate the lecture.
The "Safety Series" is sponsored
Cibki Calls ior iointly by the Federal housing Au-
thorities and the Red Cross; Accident
Prevention Bureau.
ore T1ntails A
n cans for salvage are still vital- I IH1I Of misib
ecded, George H. Gabler, countyIAttend ("An fere ne

Try a.

K flND

AT S

sv'l~s v3 ~lv4

Free booklet: "WARDROBE TRICKS". Write Judy Bond, Inc., Dept. C, 1375 B'way, N Y. 18

{ J

For
SLACK SUITS
PLAY SUITS
BATHING SUITS

Blouses
Lingeries

Housecoats
Robes

Try the
SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

ly

Tir
ne

II

LAST CALL!

r

salvage committec chairman said yes-
terday.
The cans should be properly pre-
pared and placed in cartons for city
trucks to pick up at the next col-
lection, June 6. Families living out-
side the city may leave cans at the
city yards at 721 N. Main any time,
Gabler said.
More, than one million pounds of
prepared tin cans have been collected
by the county committee in the past
two and a half years, he reported.

Alumni Association officials,

T.

Hawley Tapping and Waldo Abbott,
Jr., will attend the First District
University of Michigan Clubs annual
conference in Schnectedy, N.Y., to-
day and tomorrow.
The first District includes Michigan
Clubs of New York State and New
England.
A new Alumni Association director
will be chosen to succeed J. M. Barn-
es of Boston, Mass.

'IN
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Plenty of Nuthin'.1
But that little bit sure counts when it's an
WAiTEI RFASHION
I- rCalex
Sizes 10 to 18
From $10.95

1945 Michiganensian
Subscription Holders
must pick up their
rnnirc; of the

*

YOUR FUR COAT

0.

is yc
us g
in u
clear
bac
beau

our pride and treasure. Let
ive it proper care while not
use. Our latest process of
ring and glazing will bring
k its original luster and
uty.
COLD STORAGE . . . RESTYLING
INSURANCE ....REPAIRING

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