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May 12, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-12

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MIICHIGAN DAI.Y

SUNDAY, MAY 12, 194G

- - ---- ------- ....... . ....... . I

wwwwommommim

CO LEGE ROUND-UP:
Northwestern Siudents
Work for World Union

Kids Enjoy Su ner a 8U' Fresh Air Camp

A group of 300 Northwestern Uni-'
vcinity students have formed a "Stu-
dents for World Federation" organ-
ization, to vork to bring their ideas
for world go riim C Oser to a -
tuality.
Started six weeks ago by seven NU
students, the organization now has
Churh NCews
Picnics, outdoor meetings and panel
discussions have been planned by the
student religious groups for t9day's
programs:
The Sunday supper meeting of
GAMMA DELTA will be held out-
doors, weather permitting, at 4 p.m.
by the Student Center. Outdoor
games will be played before the sup-
per.
Alice C. Lloyd, dean of women, will
discuss "Students Look Toward Mar-
riage" for WESTMINISTER GUILD
at 6 p.m. in the social hall of the First
Presbyterian Church. Her talk will
be followed by a discussion.
Two guest speakers will participate
in the CONGREGATIONAL-DISCI-
PLES GUILD forum on "What I Be-
lieve" at 6 p.m. in the Memorial
Christian Church. The Rev. Joseph
Bogel of the First Methodist Church
in Royal Oak will speak on "A Per-
sonal God", and the Rev. R. H. Jon-
geward, minister of the First Method-
ist Church, will dicuss "God As the
Infinite Law arni Order of the Uni-
verse". A suptper will precede the
discussion.
Members of the NEWMAN CLUB
will leave St. Mary's Chapel at 3 p.m.
for a picnic at the Island. Prizes will
be awarded to the winners of the
races and games planned. In case of
rain, the hot dog supper will be held
in the Club rooms.
Dr. Henry Lewis will lead the CAN-
TERRURY CLUB discussion during
the 6 p.m. supper meeting at the
Student Center.
The UNITARIAN STUDENT
GROUP will have a buffet supper at
6:30 p.m. in the parsonage. Prof.
William Haber of the economics de-
partment will speak to the Group on
"The Purposes and Aims of Labor
Today.-"
* *.4
Dr. William Gilbert will discuss
"Christian Service" during the 4:30
p.m. meeting of the MICHIGAN
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP at Lane
Hall. A hymn will be held at 4 p.m.;

an office in a converted garage, a
phone, a car, and the support of their
ideas by many Northwestern profes-
sors. Their motto is "It is later than
you think", and they have contacted
colleges and universities all over the
world in attempting to extend the
organization.
The three aims of this group are
(1) universal membership, (2) tran-
sfer of national war sovereignty to
federal world sovereignty, and (3)
an international constitutional con-
vention to achieve these ends.
Also at Northwestern, city police
intervened last week in a kidnap
attempt when four pledges of an un-
named college fraternity bound and
gagged one active and threatened to
abduct another in an early evening
frolic.
The police released the group of
pledges after booking the driver of
the kidnap car for driving with in-
sufficient lights. The actives of the
fraternity moved swiftly to avert a
full-scale pledge uprising, according
to the Northwestern Daily.
* * *
The University of Illinois has mov-
ed to coordinate a campus power-
saving program with the state-wide
Illinois brown-out edict. The reduc-
tion in the use of electricity would
not, according to the Daily Illini, be
allowed to interfere with activities
planned for Mothers' Weekend, but
after that plans were uncertain.
Pres. A. C. Willard has asked the
Illinois Student Affairs Committee
to apply the principle of the brown-
out as much as possible in curtail-
ing student activities. It was pos-
sible, the Illini Said, that buildings
normally open after 6 p.m. for club
meetings would be closed.
* " *
The Federal Public Housing Au-
thority has assigned 600 tempor-
ary family dwelling units and 500
dormitory accomodations to Ohio
State University.
"With very few exceptions, beau-
tiful girls don't go to college", Billy
Rose, New York showman, said in an
interview with a Daily Iillini reporter.
There's no use looking around
campus for a beautiful woman, the
showman feels. His search for
beauty for a New York production
of his well-konwn Diamond horse-
she seldom produces any results on
a college campus. "When a girl
realizes that she has a gorgeous
figure she figures that she doesn't
have to fool around with higher
figures".
But the beautiful ones aren't neces-
sarily dumb either, he added.

CAMP INSPECTION-Boys line up in front of cabins for daily inspec-
tion. Room an board for each boy is provided by student, faculty and
other donations submitted in twice-yearly drives.

LAKEFRONT SCENE-Funds collected in tag day drives help buy spcrting equipment!
preservers, and diving platforms.

such as row boats, life

I

*A

*
*

^l

WATCitNG Tl' GAME -This
.yungster is watching one of the
inter-('abin field meets. Game
ho""'s art' Iu'uent dur-ing the camp

WATER OUTING---Al'l set up for a trip around the sexen lakes bordering camp grounds, this group of children
stand in one of the Fresh Air Camp boats, purchased by friends' contributions.

OVERNIGHT HIKE-Digging into the evening meal, these boys are
looking forward to the campfire sing always held before taps on over-
night hikes.

._

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

OUT TO THE FLOAT-These boys, having passed THE OLE SWIMMIN' HOLE-Out for an afternoon
Life Saving tests, man the row-boat without super- dip in Patterson Lake, which washes the camp
vision of counselor. shores.
Nominiatins Are Open for Inter-Faith Scholarshi

Rcad anid Use Thet

MC hi 'ra Daily Classifieds

(Continued from Page 7)
phitheatre. There will be a discussion
of the proposed National Research
Foundation. Dr. P. A. S. Smith will
summarize opinions expressed in the
recent poll, and Dr. Thomas Francis,
Jr., will report on the current legis-
lative situation. The public is invited.
Alpha Nu of Kappa Phi Sigma: All
present members from this or other
campuses are urged to attend the re-
organization meeting of Alpha Nu at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in 4003 Angell
Hall.
An Evening of Bridge is featured at
the International Cented every Mon-
day at 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by
ANCUM, this activity is for anyone
interested.
The Polonia Club will meet Tues-
day at 7:30 in the International Cen-
ter. Several members will give talks
on prominent Polish personalities.
Deutscher Verein will meet on
Tuesday, May 14, in Rooms 316-320
of the Union, featuring a variety pro-
gram and social hour. Refreshments
will, be served. President Trautwein
will introduce the newly elected of-
ficers for next year.
Churches
First Presbyterian Church
10:45 a.m.: Mother's Day Sermon
by Dr,. Lemon, "Indoor Exposure."
6:00 p.m.: Westminster Guild sup-
per hour followed by a talk on "Stu-
dents Look Toward Marriage," by
Dean Alice C. Lloyd.
First Congregational Church, Min-
ister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
10:45: Public Worship. Dr. Parr
will preach on "They Maintain the
'Fabric of the World."
6:00 p.m.: Congregational-Disciples
Student Guild cost supper and pro-
gram at the Memorial Christian
Church, Hill and Tappan.

ine Bldg., Washington at Fourth,
where the Bible, also the Christian
Science textbook,"Science and Health
with Key to the Scriptures," and
other writings by Mary Baker Eddy
may be read, borrowed or purchased.
Open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Grace Bible Church, State and
Huron Streets. Harold J. DeVries,
Pastor.
10:00 a.m.: Bible school. Univer-
sity class.
11:00 a.m Morning services will be
broadcast over WPAG.
12:45 p.m. "The Bible Hour" over
WPAG.
6:30 p.m.: Youth groups. We wel-
come you to enjoy this time.
7:30 p.m.: Evening hour of gospel
songs and message.
7:30 p.m. Wednesday: Mid-week
service.

Nominations are now open for stu-
dents eligible to receive the Arnold
Schiff Menorial Inter-Faith Schol-
arship and the Michigan B'nai B'rith
Council Inter-Faith Award.
The Arnold Schiff Scholarship is
a cash award of $100 and the B'nai
B'rith Council Award consists of a
collection of books dealing with thel
principle western religious traditions.
The books have a value of $50.
Names of qualified students to-
gether with recommendations from
campus religious workers may be sent
to Franklin Littell, director of the
Student Religious Association, or
Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen, director of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
The inter-faith scholarship and a-

ward were established with the co-
operation of the SRA and the Hillel
Foundation.
The two awards are given each
spring to the two University stu-
dents who are judged to have done;
the most to develop and stress inter-

eligible and there are no religious or
racial qualifications.
Judges who will select the recipi-
ents of the awards include literary
college Dean Erich A. Walter and
Professors Edward B. Ham and Reub-
en L. Kahn. Names of the winners

faith ideas on campus. Both under- will be announced at the annual
graduate and graduate students are Award Banquet, June 2.
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