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May 10, 1946 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-10

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 10, 1946

PAQZ S~ FRIDAY, ~AZ 1O~ 1946

Cost of Living
For Vets Kept
Down at 'U'
Expenses Higher
At Other Schools
The cost of living for single Univer-
sity veterans has not soared as high
here as at four other Michigan
schools, according to a survey made
this week by the Michigan Student
Veterans Association.
Single veterans at Michigan pay an
average of $93.00 each month, the
survey reported, but at Adrian, Flint
Junior College, Highland Perk Jun-
ior College and Cass Technical School
this expense is exceeded by as much
as $40.
The survey compared prices at 14
Michigan schools.
Costs Higher Elsewhere
VO estimated that married veter-
ans here pay out $152.00 each month,
while costs at other schools range
from $121.00 to $166.
Samm Bass, vice-president of the
Ann Arbor Veterans Organization,
said that other schools which report-
ed high expenses laid most of the
blame on abnormal rent prices.
Students at small schools are able
to keep down costs of rent and food
by living at home, according to Bass.
The Michigan Student Veterans
Organization made an intensive study
of the veteran subsistence problem
at their meeting at Kalamazoo last
Saturday.
Allotments Called 'Inadequate'
Bass, who represented the Uni-
versity chapter, found that student
veterans all over Michigan'are unable
to live adequately on the present gov-"
ernment subsistence allotments.
But an effort to bring about a di-
viding up of the Veterans Trust Fund
was unsuccessful, Bass said. He re-
ported that aid from the fund can be
obtained only through one of the
home districts into which the State
has been divided. The provision is
only for emergency use, he was told'
at the conference.
Late Catalogue Publication
Delays Program PlanniIg
Because of a delay in the publica-
tion of summer and fall catalogs,
freshmen and sophomores will be un-
able to plan their elections with their
academic counselors during this
month.
Catalogs will probably be ready
early in June.

TU' Scientists
Will Discuss
Research Bill
The proposed national research
foundation will be discussed at a
meeting of the Association of Uni-
versity of Michigan Scientists at 8
p.m. Monday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
A summary of opinions expressed in
the recent poll of University scien-
tists on the question will be given
by Dr. Peter A. S. Smith of the chem-
istry department. Majority opinion
in the survey .approved the Kilgore-
Magnuson Bill.
Dr. Thomas Francis of the epidem-
iology department will report on cur-
rent legislation providing for such
a foundation. Dr. F. H. Test of the
zoology department will be chair-
man.
A report on the meeting of the
Council of Federation of American
Scientists in Pittsburgh will be given
by Dr. Wilfred Kaplan of the mathe-
matics department, and expansion of
the Association's educational activit-
ies will be considered.
'Ensians Not Claimed
May 17 To Be Re-Sold
About 60 copies of the 1945 'En-
sian, .if not picked up by their owners
before May 17th, will be sold to those
who have had their names on the
waiting list since last fall.

UNION MEN NOT ALLOW ED:
Music Camp's Main Problem
Is Breaking 'Unfair Ruling'

Main problem faced by the Inter-
lochen National Music Camp is that
of "breaking the unfair ruling" which
bars union members from partici-
pating in camp activities, according
to Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, president
and secretary of the camp.
"This does not bother us in getting
faculty members," Dr. Maddy said,
since AFM members have been re-
placed with college instructors. "It
does limit us in getting guest conduc-
tors, however," he indicated.
No Union Teachers
The ruling prohibits union mem-
bers from teaching, coaching, con-
ducting or playing any instrument at
Interlochen.

fessional, performing musicians.
Therefore, he said. educators are
vitally ecncerned as to whether union
musicians are given fair treatment
and adequate livelihood.
"All dictators eventually overstep
their power," he continued. "Petrillo
will be no exception. The bill passed
Congress because the AFL did not
support him. The only question now
is how far he can get with AFM
without the support of affiliated
unions."
Capacity Enrollment Expected
The camp will open June 30 this
year with a capacity enrollment of
1,000 full time Vtudents plus 120

WRECKAGE OF. EXPLODED BOMBER - These are the remains of an army bomber which exploded in the
air south of Junction City, Ark., crashed and exploded again, resulting in the death of five army personnel
and a woman presumed to be a WAC or a nurse.
MOTORIKST S TO MOLE IN:
More OffmStreet City Parkin-g vForeseen

Announcing plans for the camp's udents in each of the thee all state
summer session, Dr. Maddydeclared groups. These are orchestra, band
that "James C. Petrillo can no long- and chorus groups which work at the
er interfere with broadcasts from camp for two weeks.
Interlochen or any other education- New features in the camp program
al institution." this summer, Dr. Maddy said, will
The bill (H.R. 1648) to prohibit be a new art building given by the
interference with the broadcasting of Michigan State Federation of Wo-
noncommercial cultural or educa- men's Clubs and a junior symphony
tional programs, became law April 16. orchestra which will be made up of 70
Purposes the Same to 80 players under 14 years of age.
"The whole union antagonism About 10 per cent of our students
against the camp was built on are on direct scholarships and al-
trumped-up charges," he continued. most 25 per cent of them are helped
"There has never been any differ- by some organization, he continued.
ence of purpose between music edu- The scholarships from the camp it-
cators and *professionals at Inter- self go mostly to the students playing
lochen or any place else." the less common instruments such
He explained that the main purpose as the string bass, basson, tuba and
of music education is to train pro-, alto and bass clarinets.

By JOHN CAMPBELL
Not so many years from now mot-

orists in the business sections of
large cities may have to use elevators
to reach parking lots.
A definite tendency toward pro-
vision of off-street parking and load-
ing facilities is seen by Prof. Roger
L. Morrison of the highway engineer-
ing and transport department.
"In many cities," he said, "efforts
are now being made to establish
off-street parking centers where
sufficient privately-owned space is
not provided. It is planned that
these parking centers will be ope-
rated by the city or leased by the
city to private operating companies,
with the city maintaining some
supervision."
In the long run, Prof. Morrison
pointed out, it is cheaper to provide
off-street parking centers than to
attempt to widen the streets to per-
mit curb-parking space, since this
usually necessitates tearing down the
fronts of buildings along the street.
"One of the largest and most
successful parking centers now in
operation," he coted, "is located
under the beautiful Union Square
in San Francisco. Composed of four
levels, this parking center can ac-
comodate 1,700 cars at one time."
In Detroit, he said, voters have ap-
proved plans for a parking lot to
be located under Washington
Boulevard, and the group of plan-

ners is trying to sell other cities on
underground parking centers. Prof.
Morrison mentioned the Rackham
Building facilities as a local small-
scale example of underground
loading.
Although the growing trend toward
off-street parking has caused expan-
sion of the ordinary city open parking
lots and parking garages, he said, it
is necessary that building room be

conserved. A solution to this prob-I
lem, he added, is seen by some plan-
ners in the construction of parking
buildings, many stories high, in
which cars can be raised to parking
spaces by elevators or series of ramps.
"Off-street parking centers are be-
ing advocated by highway traffic
experts as a measure to decrease
traffic congestion in large cities,"
Prof. Morrison declared.

id

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)

r

Extra Performance Tonight at 7:30 p.m.
The Department of Speech Presents
TH E CHILDREN'S THEATRE
in
"THE CAMEL WITH THE WRINKLED KNEES"
Tickets, Children 30c, Adults 60c

meet in Rm. 4065, Nat. Sci. Bldg.
today at 12:15.
Program: John Bayless will discuss
"Conference on training in geology,
G.S.A." All interested are cordially
invited to attend.
The Angell Hall Observatory will
be open to visitors tonight from 8:30
to 10:30, if the sky is clear, to ob-
serve the Moon and Jupiter. If the
sky is cloudy or nearly cloudy, the
Observatory will not be open. Child-
ren must be accompanied by adults.
The regular weekly Tea Dance will
be held this afternoon at the Inter-
national Center from 4 to 6 under
the sponsorship of ANCUM. Anyone
interested is cordially invited.
Wesleyan Guild and Westminister
Guild will have a Box Social tonight
from 8:30 to 12:00 in the Guild
Lounge of the Methodist Church.
Boxes should contain food for two.
There will be dancing later in the
evening. Further information may be
obtained by calling 6881.
Coming Events
The School of Business Administra-
tion will hold its Sixteenth Annual
Alumni Conference Sat., May 11. The
general session held at 2:30 p.m. in
the Rackham Lecture Hall is open to
the campus and public.
Frank W. Ketter, Chief, Division
of Investment and Economic Devel-
opment, Department of State, will
speak on the topic, "Restoring Multi-
lateral Trade."
Sumner H. Slichter, Lamont Uni-
versity Professor, Harvard University,
Graduate School of Business Admin-
istration, will discuss, "The Industrial
Relations Outlook."
This session is open, and all stu-
dents and faculty members intcrested
are welcome.
Association of University of Michi-
gan Scientists. The next meeting will
be held on Mon., May 13, at 8:00 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheatre. There
will be a discussion of the proposed
National Research Foundation. Dr.

P. A. S. Smith will summarize opin-
ions expressed in the recent poll, and
Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr., will report
on the current legislative situation.
The public is invited.
The Graduate Outing Club is plan-
ning an afternoon of outdoor sports
on Sunday, May 12. Those interested
should pay the supper fee at the
checkroom desk in the Rackham
Building before noon Saturday and
should meet at 2:30 Sunday in the
Outing Club rooms in the Rackham
Building. Use northwest entrance.
International Center: All persons
intending to attend the International
Center's picnic Saturday, May 11,
please sign up on the Center's Bullet-
in Board. The picnic will start
promptly at 2:00 p.m. from the Cent-
er. All students, Foreign and Amer-
ican, are cordially invited to attend.
Further details may be obtained in
the Center.
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet Sunday at 5:30 p.m. in
Zion Lutheran Parish Hall. Supper
will follow the fellowship hour at
6:00.
Lutheran Student Association Sun-
day morning Bible Hour will be held
at the Center, 1304 Hill Street, at
9:15.
PRINTING
PROGRAMS . CARD)S STATIONERY
HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NoRTH MAIN
ATHENS PRESS
li ____________ ___ _______________________________

11

Box Office Phone 6300

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

AIRPLANES TO RENT
FLIGHT INSTRUCTION
RETURNING AIR FORCE PILOTS . . . Check out
in one of our light planes and get your civilian
license.
Make our SKY CLUB facilities your home at the
airport.
Gridley Flying S brice
Licensed by State Department of Aeronautics
Authorized Dealers: Aeronca - Bellanca - Commonwealth
Ann Arbor Airport - 4320 South State Rood
Ann Arbor Phone 25-8825

Itew & 9 for £pzrin CnjopneNt
NOVELS

TIHE SNAKE PIT-I-Mary Ja icWard
PAST ALL DISHONOR-James M. Coin
THE SOUND OF YEARS-Merriam Model
THE TURQUOISE-Anya Seton .
MEMBER OF THE WEDDING-Carson McCuelers

$2.50
2.00
2.75
2.50
2.50

: r

NON-FICTION

I

A SOLO IN TOM TOMS-Gene Fowler.
THE GREAT DIVORCE-C. S. Lewis..
MY THREE YEARS WITH EISENHOWER-Capt. Harry Butcher.
THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN READER-Edited by Ray B. West, Jr.
(:RFAT -PRF STOPIFS--Pane Conner-Iilstrated h Paul Bro'

3.00
1.50
5.00
3.50
wn 3.501

II

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