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April 25, 1946 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-04-25

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PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY
- ~ --~-- - - - - - - - -- -- -----.-_________________________________________________-

1TJRSDAY. AP'RIL 25, 1146

Dean Bursley W-arns Married.
Students of Housing Scarcity
Housing facilities will be particu- than the dormitories. Six dormitor-
larly scarce for married couples next ies this summer will not be used be-
fall, Dean Joseph Bursley warned at cause of needed repairs.
a meeting of the AVC at West Lodge This semester 5,000 veterans were
Community House last night. expected to enroll, while the actual
Students having houses were urged enrollment was 6,400. The Univer-
to keep them during the summer in sity provided 1,00 apartments in
order to be sure of having a place and around Westport for mar-
to live next fall. Dormitory facilities ried couples and housing facilities
this summer will be given to fresh- for 700 single students. Thirty-
men and disabled veterans who must eight double modern housing units
expect to double up in singles, while were moved to Willow Village near
during the summer and fall terms the Coliseum to accommodate 76
Willow Village will be less crowded couples.
By next fall two new dormitories
capable of providing room for 1,000
S eech Contest students are expected to be com-
pleted. One of these being built for
W women students will house men for
the first two years. 176 apartments
are being constructed for veterans
Judy Minogue, Lois next fall, for which 1,000 applica-
tions have already been received.
Garnitz r ke Honors Dean Bursley in announcing that
the first obligation was to Michigan
Lois Garnitz and Judy Minogue students said, "These are not the
won first and second places for ther kinds of facilities that we would pick
speeches entitled "The Unconquera- out for you, but we are better off
ble French" and "Our Relations with than most other schools." Other
Franco Spain" in the freshman schools, he said, had housing facili-
speech contest concluded in the ties 30 miles away from campus,
Speech Assembly yesterday. while one school had constructed 300
Other girls who competed for high- bunks in their gymnasium to house
est freshman speech honors were students.
Gwen Williams who spoke on "The
Need for a Consumer Lobby"; Gwen-
dolyn Sperlich who discussed the race
problem in her speech entitled "I am
an American"; and Georgiana Benesh For Research
whose speech was entitled "Marriage
Judges for the contest were Prof. Non-current federal agency records
Louis M. Eich, Upton S. Palmer and in the National Archives at Washing-
George Currie of thespeech depart- ton are now available to students for
ment. Thomas C. Trueblood, who research purposes, Tar. Solon J. Buck,
founded the speech department in
1892 and the Michigan golf team, archivist of the United States, re-
was also present. vealed in a speech yesterday.
Dr. Buck said that since the war's
Prol Press o Atend end the government has been lager to
Prof. Preuss To Attend openthe accumulatedrecords to all
Washington Meetings persons engaged in research. The
National Archives, he pointed out,
Prof. Lawrence Preuss of the polit- were founded 10 years ago in an at-
ical science department is attending tempt to assemble public records that
a meeting of the Teachers of Inter- had been stored for 150 years in at-
national Law and also a meeting of tics and basements of public build-
the American Society of International ings. The job is not yet done, he
Law this week in Washington, D. C. added.w

CARRIER FUR WEIGHS ANCHOR FOR MANEUVERS-As tugs circle
about her in Hampton Roads, Norfolk, Va., the mighty carrier Franklin
D. Roosevelt-with President Truman aboard-starts to move out for
the beginning of Atlantic maneuvers. President Truman will watch car-
rier task force operations during his one-week vacation cruise. The
large-scale Navy maneuvers will continue through a five-week period,
HONEST GOVERNMENT:
.Laws Devoted to Selfish Ends
Cause Depressions, Siglear Says
R108 eU~le 0 eI n3

Representatives
Chosen by IRA
For Meeting
Civil Liberties Group
Will Meet il Detroit
Theodore Rosenberg, Maxine Spen-
cer and Rona Eskin were appointed
delegates to the Civil Liberties Con-
gress meeting in Detroit this week-
end at a meeting of the Inter-Racial
Association held yesterday at the
Union.
The Congress has asked liberal or-
ganizations from all over the country
to send delegates to help organize a.-
offensive against fascist aggression
in the United States. Topics that will
be discussed during the course of the
two-day session include protecting
minorities, theaColumbia, Tenn., case,
labor rights, and domestic fascistic
organizations. Prof. John Shepard
of the psychology department, presi-
dent of the Michigan Civil Rights
Federation, is one of the sponsors of
this meeting.
Members of IRA also voted to as-
sist MYDA in their campaign May 2
and 3 to circulate petitions in order
to 'publicize the Columbia, Tenn.,
case and aid the victim of the at-
tempted lynching there.
Plans for brotherhood week and
for coordinating the work of the lib-
eral organizations on campus were
also discussed.
Panel Includes
VU Professors
City Planning Will Be
Discussed by Institute
Six University faculty members will
participate in round table discussions
at the Local Planing Institute sched-
uled to meet Tuesday in Port Huron.
The panel of experts on the city-
village round table will include Rob-
ert N. Cross of the Bureau of Business
Research, Prof. Amos Hawley of the
sociology department, Prof. Harlow
Whittemore of the department of
landscape architecture, Prof. Howard
Y. McClusky of the School of Educa-
tion, and John Perkins, secretary of
the Institute for Public Administra-
tion.
Draft Issue Is
To Be Debated
Compulsory peacetime military ser-
vice will be discussed at the Eleventh
Annual Conference on Problems in
School and College Cooperation which
will meet at 2 p.m. today in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Henry W. Miller, Chairman of the
Department of Mechanism and En-
gineering . Drawing, will discuss the
affirmative side and Virgil M. Rogers,
Superintendent of Schools in Battle
Creek, will discuss the opposing view-
point.
George E. Carrothers, director of
the Bureau of Co-operation with Ed-
ucational Institutions, will be chair-
man.

C iristirity Fiort.i .
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will hold an open forum on
Christianity at 8 p.m. today in Lane
Hall.
The discussion will center around
the two topics used in the Fellow-
ship's recent essay contest, "Why I
Am a Christian" and "Why I Am Not
a Christian." Following presentation
of the contest prizes, the two winning
essays will be read. Calvin Didier will
give his arguments for being a Chris.
tian and Robert Taylor will explain
why he is not a Christian. The
meeting will then be open for discus-
sion.
Franklin H. Littell, director of the
Student Religious Association, will
act as chairman of the discussion.
Spanish Conversation .
La Sociedad iispanica will hold
its weekly conversational meeting
at 4 p.m. today in the League cafe?
teria. The group has asked any
people who arc interested in Span-
ish to attend.
Film on Beethoven .. .
"The Life and Loves of Beethoven,"
a motion picture starring Harry
Baur, will be presented at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow and Saturday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The. film traces, the course of

Beethoven's life, and excerpts from
his works are played. The dialogue is
in French with English subtitles on
the screen.
Preceding the Beethoven picture,
there will be a short of Jacques Thi-
baud playing Albeniz's "Malaguena."
Both films are being presented by
the Art Cinema League.
4 * 4
All-Nations club ...
A discussion of current affairs
will highlight the All-Nations club
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the
International Center.
Turkish Pro gram .,
"Modern Turkey," the first in a
,eries of area studies intended to ac-
quaint students with the traditions,
ideals and way of life of foreign
countries, will be presented by the
International Student Exchange
Committee at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
The area studies will consist of
panel discussions and lectures on tehe
history, religion, social and political
structure, and economic aspects of
such geographic areas as the Near
East, Latin America and the Bal-
kans.
The Turkish program will include
a film on modern Turkey and a panel
discussion.

Campus Highlights

R4

THEY'RE HERE!,
T11CE COLGE
A LIMITED SUPPLY
Now Available at

DETROIT, April 24 - (A") - Kim
Sigler, candidate for the Republican
nomination for governor, declared in
a radio campaign address tonight
that laws written by "greedy financial
interests and- their lobbyists" were
partly responsible for the economic
depression of the '30's in Michigan.
Warning that the nation again is
heading into a boom period when
the public is not watchful of legisla-
tion, Sigler declared the issue in the
current political campaign is:
"Who is to write the laws of Michi-
gan-the men elected and entrusted
with that duty by the people of Mich-
igan, or the lobbyists employed by
selfish, hidden financial interests?"
Speaking over a radio network,
Sigler, former special prosecutor of
the Ingham County grand jury, de-
clared "there are a thousand indica-
ToEdit orna1ts
'U o o . *
'r-U1. N-I R J StrS a
10 h ,OtlR
Profs. Norman _ ,.Hartweg and
Reeve M. Bailey of the Museum of
Zoology stall have been appointed
"ana ging editors of "Copcia," offi-
cial journal of the American Society
of Ichtlhyologiss and Herpetologists
which met last week in Pittsburgh.
Dr. William A. Gosline was elected
and Dr. Lartweg re-elected to the
Board of Governors of the Society.
Dr. Emmet T. Hooper and Dr. W.
H. Burt, also of the Museum of Zo-
ology, were reelected corresponding
secretary and member of the Board
of Directors, respectively, of the
American Society of Mammalogists,
which also met in Pittsburgh last
week.

tions that, 'ere long, our present in-
dustrial troubles will subside and
Michigan will launch out on a pe-
riod of unprecedented prosperity.
Then, as never before, will there be
need for the people of Michigan to
be watchful against the current lob-
byist, selfish interest and the public
servant who betrays his trust."
Sigler declared he was a candidate
for governor because "some one must
make the fight for clean government
and honest government in Michigan."
Reciting the record of the Carr
grand jury, Sigler recalled the ac-
quittal of Frank D. McKay and four
others on charges of conspiracy to in-
filuence the Liquor Control Commis-
sion.
"No sooner," he said, "were Frank
McKay and the other defendants re-
leased than the avowed enemies of
the grand jury, the 'enemies of dis-
closing and uncovering graft and cor-
ruption, delivered a blow in the ap-
pointment of a Senate investigating
committee."
Persons fearing a grand jury in-
dictment on the Branch Bank bill,
Sigler said, have sabotaged the work
of the grand jury and added "they
stop at nothing."
Aluini Give Mountings
To East Quadrangle
Colorful mountings depicting scenes
of foreign countries, for the four
recreation rooms of the East Quad-
rangle, have been procured from sev-
eral alumni by T. Hawley Tapping,
general secretary of the Alumni As-
sociation.

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