100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. MARCH 31. 1946

Spring's Arrival at Indiana
Welcomed by Aromatic Daily

The March 21 edition of the Indi-
ana Daily Student reached subscrib-
ers smelling fragrantly of Mais Oui,
Matchabelli, and any other aromas
available. The "Essence of Spring"
was concocted by the editor, and
sprayed on the papers as they rolled
off the presses.
Students and faculty members at
the University of Kansas, armed with
knives, nail files and the more con-
ventional dandelion diggers, wage
war every spring against the dande-
lions on the Mt. Oread campus.
Dandelion War
D-Day and H-Hour for this year's
campaign have not yet been set, the
University Daily Kansan says, but
weather reports indicate that the en-
emy will soon attack in force. In past
years classes have been dismissed for
the battle against the pesky little in-
truders.
An editorial in the student paper
of the University of Cincinnati asks
why "so many classes have to have
texts inflicted on them that arehnot
much good but were written by UC
professors? Higher education should
be above such considerations."
The Purdue Exponent suggests that
BEER VAULT
Beer - Wine - Mixers - Keg Beer
10 to 10 Daily
8 A.M. to 11 P.M. Sat.
303 N. 5th Ave. Ph. 8200

as a memorial to students and alumni
of that university killed in World
War Two, the university either con-
struct a carillon tower or establish
an International Scholarship Fund
to enable exchange students to study
at foreign universities.
Also at Purdue, it has been an-
nounced that the ratio of men to
women students is now 3.17 to 1. The
Michigan ratio is 1.8 to 1.
'Sad Sack Shuffle'
The second annual veteran-spon-
sored "Sad Sack Shuffle," a combina-
tion floor-show and dance, was held
at the University of Wisconsin last
night, according to the Wisconsin
Daily Cardinal. At the affair 15 pairs
of nylons donated by Madison mer-
chants were auctioned off to 15 lucky
people, with the proceeds going to
the Red Cross.
All-time High
The Ohio State Lantern reports
that enrollment record at that uni-
versity has reached an all-time high
of 14,313 students in the spring quar-
ter. This is 255 abovethe earlier all-
time record attained during the win-
ter quarter of this year, and almost
doubles the 7,653 total for the spring
term of last year.
At Columbia University, Thomas
McGoey, director of residence halls,
says that the Columbia housing situ-
ation is unde'r control, although cer-
tain of the emergency accommoda-
tions are not as good as they might
be.

Miss Storraard
Will ' rset
Vocal Ieital
Lorrfa St nm r( mn -~ n n
assisted by Lub-v oan Kthiiam-
pianist, will aa a n rti tl at
8:30 p.m. tomoon Lia Med-
ssonl theater.
Miss St oraan has held solo posi_-
tions at Imnnn Presbyrian
Church in D
Church in Y~ia~ ir B-
tist Churh in -i r
member of Sim l!a oan
Univmsit y Cl orlI Piatah;:
Pupil 0f H n n
Mis Sn-
elude (~10>ttOb ob iadl
and Schuber and wd
in partial foLfiinn t._h,..i -
ments f or heBt aI t uit _
grec.
9,RA t$IlllI4
The music c-
dent Reli gious Asso^ i .r1in.will e
at 5 p.m. torow in) 1 I zn al

Play Production
Will Preent
Ki1d LadrI'
''Kind Lady" was announced by the
(palment of e h a t net of-
ferin of lay Poducion t be re-
sen ed April 10 through 13 in the
Lydia Mendels::hn Theatre.
"Kind Lady" is a mystery mo-
( 7ama by EClward Chodorvo. It was
tp ced on Broadway in 1935
a wasre d again in 1940. both
...d<<t ions t.a rin: Grace George.
Four pet tot nans will be given,
We sday througi Saturday eve-
gs Auil 10-13. Tickets will be
eMday April 8 in the
l hetre box office wih mail orders
eing accepted before that date.
TYPE WRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

NEW UAW OFrICERS-The newly elected officers of the International JAW pose after the election. (left
to right) R. J. Thomas, vice-president; George Addea, secretary-treasurer; Waiter P. Reuther, president,
and Richard T. Leonard, vice-president.
S** * *. -- -__ _______

J,'
l
r
7c
J
/te
7
7p
7
<: CA
7
/ 24S

C R EM Sf5A TE 'NE E
A rich emollient cream, softening, soothing-and
pink. Smooth it on, and lather it up, with warm
water, into silky, deep-cleansing suds, $1.00 Plus Tax
ILE N TilEIIw9IC
JJ(INSm-FIEICHER

REUTHER SAYS:
No 'Outsit
Ottg
To D iCtat
By The Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY, March 30 -
President Walter P. Reuther says no
"outside" group-"whether Commun-
ist, Trotskyite or Socialist"-is going
to dictate to his CIO-United Auto
Workers Union.
The newly elected UAW-CIO head,
in press conference assertions made
public as the union closed its tenth
convention, said he was going to keep
the union free from any "interfer-
ence," political or non-political.
Reuther, at 38, president of one of
America's largest and most influential
Phillips...
(Continued from Page 1)
Dr. Phillips claimed. They are be-
ing denied their rights under the
ordinary principles of British jus-
tice and procedure.
"It is not a new thing for the Ca-
nadian government to act in an ar-
bitrary manner. They used this type
of measure all through the war, call-
ing it preventive detention. However,
in this particular case," he declared,
"they passed a secret Order in Coun-
cil to cover the situation. The arrest
of Fred Rose, the only Communist
member of the Canadian Parliament,
is another example of such action."
This is a long-range and deep
problem of civil liberties for Can-
ada. The actual danger from spy-
ing and espionage is not the impor-
tant thing. It is a question of how
much freedom the Canadian Com-
munists can be allowed under the
British law.
"Can a nation which professes to
call itself democratic legitimately use
these dictatorial measures to pro-
tect its democracy?" Dr. Phillips asks.
"I do not believe it can. The Com-
munists cannot and should not be
suppressed, but must be combatted
with the proper educational measures.
The problems of the people should be
solved by the government, so they do
not feel the need to turn to Commun-
ism."

le' Group
_toUAW
labor unions, expressed himself on aE
variety of subjects, including CIO-
AFL relations and the possibility of
a third party.
Asked the extent of any Commun-
ist influence in the auto union, he
made no direct reply, but said about
10 per cent of the membership had
"outside loyalties." He asserted he
was a member of no political party
himself although he said he belonged
to the Socialists for about a year,
around 1932.
People in the union whom he will
fight, he said, are "primarily" those
with "political affiliations which they
place above their union" or persons
who "base trade union policies on
outside interests."
On national politics, the intent,
red-haired young unionist said he
opposed "premature launching" of a
third party, but favored preparing
now for a third party "at some future
date."
Reuther said major projects of his
union administration would be or-
ganization o the 300,000 to 400,000
white collar workers of the auto in-
dustry, an annual wage in the indus-
try, and "master agreements" set-
ting up wage floors for auto workers.

Beneficiaries of
Deceased Vets
Guaranteed Aid
The Ann Arbor Counseling Center
announced a plan yesterday to insure
that all possible government bene-
fits are made available to the bene-
ficiaries of veterans who died in ser-
vice.
Beneficiaries are entitled to in-
surance, pensions for themselves and
children, gratuity pay and other aids
from both State and Federal govern-
ment, according to Veteran Counselor
Karl Karsian.
He requested that beneficiaries of
veterans who died in service provide
the Counseling Center at 223 East
Ann with their names and addresses.
The Counseling Center will make an
individual check as soon as the list
is complete to assure allbenefits and
rights have been provided, Karsian
said.
Non-Credit Course
In Golf Is Offered
The University Extension Service
will offer a non-credit course in golf,
giving individual instruction to be-
ginners as well as more advanced
golfers, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day for women and 5 p.m. Thursday
for men.

r I r a 'Vf I~
Y ou ChoiCe of
.1x
[
Now!
EASTER CARDS
FRANCL C ~4WCE PHOTO CO.
723 North University
n'fXNf M A >z3

s'o Ghe

outh State

uort t
818 South State

BECAUSE

IT'S PDm

N N

L

STARTING
TODAY!

'

NOW!

JU'DY GARLAND
Dn A Wonlerous
Entertainment
Delight!.
right off
with the range!
JOHN HODIAK
RAY BOLGER
Lonsburylo160
~i1Y
:2 /
D-1iY

IN LOVE...AS YOU LOVE HER BEST!
BECAUSE IT'S 6a iazt
LGAUIHTON
NEVER SO WARMLY MERRY BEFORE!
BECAUSE IT'S Inc/1
TONE
H A V IN G H IS H A PPIEST LOVE AFFAIR!
UNI VERSAL PRESENTS

9

r . r ,
. /

tF

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan