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March 27, 1946 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-27

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PAGE I

THE MICHU:AN DlAILY

WEDNESDAY. MARC!! 27, 194

.... . .... . .... . ....... . ...... ... ._-

FIRST OF SERIES:
Reporters' Clinic To Be Held
At Detroit Rackham Memorial

The first of a tentative series of Re-
porters' Clinics will be held Friday
night at the Rackham Educational
Memorial in Detroit, under the joint
sponsorship of the University Ex-
tension Service and the Industrial
Editors' Association.
The clinic, the first of its kind ever
presented by the Extension Service,
will be attended by scribes of Ameri-
can Legion posts in Detroit, reporters
for industrial newspapers, and other
non-professional reporters who pro-
vide news for society, church and
fraternal editors of the metropolitan
newspapers.
Arthur M. Brandon, director of the
University Information Service, will
welcome the group for the University,
and Bruce Kerr, president of the In-
dustrial Editors' Association, will
greet the reporters for the organiza-
tion. A talk entitled "When' Words
Collide" will be given by H. C. L.
Jackson, Detroit News columnist.
A skit, "The Holy Grill", exempli-
fying the right and wrong ways to
conduct an interview, will be present-
ed by Prof. John L. Brumm of the
journalism department, and Miss
Mary Lu Heath and William Mullen-
dore, former journalism students at
the University. Elmer M. Applegit,
governor of the House Magazine In-
ook Coeds To
Give Program
Girls from Martha Cook Dormitory
will present the Sunday night Inter-
national Center program at 7:30p.m.
in Rms. 316-20 of the Union.
Songs, dances and instrumental
solos will-be featured on the pro-
gram, which wily be followed by a so-
cial hour in the Center.
* * *
The Post Hostilities Training Corps
will hold a coffee hour for Latin
American students from 4:30 to 6
p.m. today in the International Cen-
ter.
Puerto Rican students will be guests
of honor at the International Center
tea at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow.
* * *
A tea dance for all foreign and
American universities will be dis-
by the All-Nations Club from 4 to 6
p.M. Friday in the International Cen-;
ter. The club will hold the first of a1
series or bridge nights from 7:30 to
10 p.m. Friday in the Center.
Dr. Gale Will Confer
Otn Foreign Students
Plans for the houing and screen-
ing of foreign students coming to
American Universities will be dis-
cussed by Dr. Eson M. Gale, director
of the International Center and coun-
selor to foreign students, with edu-
cational authorities in New York and
Washington D. C. this week.
Dr. Gale left Ann Arbor yesterday
for New York. Among other topics
to be discussed by Dr. Gale is the pos-
sibility of reopening exchange fel-
lowships with Brazil, the Near East,
and China.

stitute, New York, will speak on "The
Reporters Job."
After the general session, smaller
group conferences wil be held. These
will include discussions of city desk
and church page news, and meetings
for reporters on industrial publica-
tions, club publicity chairman, the
scribes of the American Legion News,
and fraternal reporters.
An exhibit of industrial publica-
tions will be on display.
Louis Benkert To Speak
On 'Resistance Welding'
Louis M. Benkert will speak on
"Resistance Welding" at the regular
meeting of the Student Chapter of
the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Union.
He will illustrate his lecture with
sli(es.

Petitions for
Dance Positions
Are Due Today
Applicants for Senior Ball com-
mittee chairmanships should include
their qualifications and their plans
for the dance in their applications.
Chairmen, who will be chosen to
head the patrons, decorations, publi-
city, music, programs, tickets, refresh-
ments and building committees, as
well as two co-chairmen who will co-
ordinate the committees, will be se-
lected equally from the senior classes
of the engineering and literary
schools, which are sponsoring the
dance.
The Senior Class Councils of the
two schools will interview the candi-
dates after all applications have been
received. Applications should be
turned in before 5 p.m. Monday to
Don Snider, president of the engin-
eering school senior class, Pat Barett,
president of the literary school senior
class, or placed in the Judiciary
Council petition box in the under-
graduate office of the League.

ASSOCIATED

PDC TURE NE~WS

P ERESS

4

Campus Highlights

N E W A I R F 0 R C E S T A F F-Gen. Carl A. Spaatz (third from left, seated). Army Air
Forces chief, meets with his new staff in Washington. Seated, 1. to r.: Lt. Gen. John K. Cannon,
Barksdale, Fla.; Gen. George C. Kinney, Andrews Field, Md.; Gen. Spaatz; Lt. Gen. Harold L. Georg,
Washington; Lt. Gen. George E.'Stratemeyer, New York City; Maj. Gen. E. R. Quesada, Laley
Field, Va. Standing, i. to r.: Lt. Gen. Nathan F. Twining, Wright Field, 0.; M. Cl l o-ld 'ilo,
Egiin Field, Fla., and Maj. Gen. Muir S. Fairchild, Maxwell Fie ,

Peru Lecture.
Special program on Peru, a part of
the Lecture Series on Latin American
Countries sponsored by the Latin
American Society, will be given at
8 p.m. today in the Rackham Am-
phitheater.
Speaker of the evening will be
Carlos Jaramillo, a medical student
from Lima, Peru. Motion pictures of
that land will also be shown. The
grain is open to the public.
A. V. C. Election -. -
All veterans are invited to the
election of officers of the Ann Ar-
bor American Veterans Committee
at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Un-
ion.
"Should the OPA Be Contin-
tjed?" will be the main topic for dis-
cussion at the meeting. The pros
and cons of the question will be
presented by several members of
the *AVC Legislative Action Com-
mittee, and the AVC will adopt a
t oliceY on,the issue.
Free Trade Debate. ..
Members of the debate squad will
argue the question of whether or not
the U.S. should establish free trade
among the nations of the world in a
parliamentary debate with students
from Albion College at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in the Union.
Everyone is urged to attend to hear
and participate in the discussion of
a bill proposing free world trade.
Revci it d 6f erferce .r. .
Prof. William D. Revelli, conduc-
tor of the University bands, will
attend the Music Educators Na-
tional Conference in Cleveland
which begins tomorrow. Prof. Re-
velli is chairman of the University
and College Band Conductors As-
sociation which will hold its annual
meetings Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday.
For the general session of the
conference, Prof. Revelli will con-

duct "The Legend," a tone poem by
Paul Creston.
At the session on adjudication, he
has been appointed expert critic
and will evaluate and criticize the
performance of a band of select
musicians from various Cleveland
schools.
Littel To Speak *
Franklin Littell, director of the
Student Religious Association, will
give two lectures at a Mennonite re-
treat the week-end of April 6 at Ak-
ron, Pa.
Mr. Littell will speak on "The Cen-
trality of the Great Commission for
the Anabaptists" and "The Anabap-
tist Contribution to Contemporary
Religious Life."
The retreat is sponsored by the
Mennonite Central Commnittee of Ak-
ron.
V. 0. Election Today .. .
Nomination and election of a
corresponding-secretary and publi-
city manager are scheduled at a
special meeting of the campus Vet-
erans Organization at 7:30 p.m. to-
day at the Union.
Irving Kalin, who was appointed
as publicity manager shortly be-
fore the fall semester, will seek elec-
tion to that post. The proposed
constitution for the Michigan State
Veterans Association will be pre-
sented for discussion and approval
at the meeting.
IBible Study Today.
There will be a Michigan Christian
Fellowship Bible Study at 8 p.m. to-
day in Lane Hall.
Seutitiwr on Religh. ..
Officers of Interguild Council
and representatives of cooperating
groups will participate in a seminar
on student Christian movements
to be held at 4:10 p.m. every Wed-
nesday in Lane Hall.
The seminar will meet for the
first time today.

A C R O B A T -Margaret
Jean Thornton, Goldsboro, N. C.,
does a. routine on a 'swinging
rope at a gym meet at Woman's
College of the University - of
North. Carolina, Greensboro. f(

D R E S S M A K E R A T W 0 R K--Army veteran James Spear (seate ) operates a sewing
machine at a Fall River, Mass., plant where 37 former Grs are manufacturing smmer cotton dresses
for women nd(er an on-the-job training program. Standing (1. to r.): h[arry . o mson, foren; Alviu
Sopkin, president of the firm; Francis Walsh, Harold Baker and Bernard jcile.

V I S I TO R,-.Mrs. Adela de
Obregon Santacilia, founder and
director of the Women's Univer-
sity of Mexico, will visit women's
schools during a three-month's
tour of the U. S. She also wilt
be a guest of the state depart=
ment in Washington.'

R.I D E I M, C O W B OY-Bud Spealman, Fort Worth,
Tex., "goes up facing east and comes down facing west" on this
bucking bronc at a San Angelo, Tex., rodeo. The sport of cowboys,
is a tough one, many performers winding up in a hospital. '

S A P ' S R U N N I N C - Barbara Tuttle (left),;Adrian,
Mich., and Thais Lucas, Berrien Springs, Mich., assist in maple
sap gathering operations in Michigan State College's sugar buwh.
The college expects to produce 150 gallons of syrup.

HTE Bell System serves over a million more telephones now than it
did a year ago. That's one big reason why Long Distance calling has
continued heavy even though the, war is over. Sometimes traffic jams
occur on certain circuits and calls are delayed. In Michigan, delays
are more likely to be encountered on calls to other states. When the
operator requests it, you can help tremendously by limiting your call
to five minutes.
We're working hard to speed the day when all your calls will go
hrnyh mm ammnitlu Thi s ve athe Bell Svtem i addin o nver 2.000.000

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