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March 05, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, INA

-----------.H T .... ..........E... .......-....Y. ... .. M. ...

Assenbly Planne Ifor Foreign S tnudents;
Nationalities RIepresented la 4U' Change
- - - --- - --- -- -

N bu er of 1 ren4b! If a new enofmettns,"
1 n t b, ileexplaineda, "shows-;a great-
Students Is Same e s 'f"4 't? *
Stud nts s .C i o 'r diversity of nationalities repre-
snted than ever before. In contrast
"Although enrollment figures are to the past few years when China
not yet complete, there is no indica- w a s predominantly represented,
tion that there will be any appreci- many students from Near Eastern
able increase in the number of for- lountries have now made their ap-
eign students now in attendance a pearanee.
the University," Dr. Esson M. Gale, "Some of the Near Eastern coun-
,director of the International Centei,
said yesterday. ntries now sponsoring students on
Dr. Gale did point out, however, :ampus are Palestine, Syria, Lebanon,
that there is a marked change in the Iraq, Greece, and Egypt."
nationalities represented this se- This diversity in representation, Dr.
mester. Gale believes, is very encouraging.
However, further increase in foreign
J H student exchanges must await the ad-
-L o . . . justient of housing problems facing
this University as well as most others.
(Continued from Page 1) Two terms ago, Dr. Gale report-
ed, the proportion of foreign stu-
talists, pretty sister quartet, Stuart dent enrollment to the entire en-
Foster, vocalist, and Charlie Shavers, rollment was 10 per cent, but today
on the trumpet. it has dropped to 4 per cent. This
Approximately 15 booths will sur- drop is not due to any decrease in
round the dance floor of the I. M. the number of foreign students
building providing a place for con- registered here, but rather to the
versation and meeting. friends. At tremendous increase in ordinary
least 35 men should combine to spon- enrollments.
sor a booth and booth-sharing pref- There will be approximately 575
erence may be given. Furniture and foreign students on campus this term,
floor-lamps should be provided by i a number closely matching that of
sponsors and should be set up in t e th1e previous term.
booths by noon Friday, and removed "The housing problem as regard
by noon Saturday. these students," Dr. Gale related, "is
Any group which has not yet crn~ +itical, as it is with all other groups.
tracted for a booth should contact But so far the International Center
Collee Ide, booth chairman, at 2-2560 tias managed to place all students.
before Thursday. There is no chargc However well solved we may think the
for booths, and it is hoped that all situation is today, there is no question
organized houses will provide a booth that our facilities have reached the
to relieve the congestion of the lobby saturation point."
and dance-floor.
Broad cast Ph " ON E-
In Abeyance DYC
Arrangements f or broadcastingD R C LI
J-Hop from 12:30 to 1 a.m. Friday
have been completed with radio sta-
tion WJR in Detroit and with Tommy SER)
Dorsey, but final consent for the
broadcast rests with the Detroit Local "BONDED P
of the American Federation of Musi-
cians.
J-H-ops were broadcast annually in
the past until the war caused the dis BA N D BO X
continuance of the practice, accord-
ing to Prof. Waldo Abbott, director of 121 East Li
the University Broadcasting Service.
Name bands as well as celebrities in
attendance at the dance were fea- FREE PICK-UP AND
tured on the short sustaining pro-
gram.

Center Will hdl
Get-Together
A get-together Assembly for all for-
eign students now on campus is sched-
uled for 7:30 p. m. Sunday in the In-
ternational Center.
A tradition at the outset of every
semester, the assembly is designed to
acquaint all foreign students with the
services of the International Center,
each other, and campus activities in
general.
In announcing the program, Dr.
Esson M. Gale, director of the Center,
said that Dr. Peter Okkelberg, Dean
:f the Graduate School, would de-
liver a welcoming address. Other
speakers will be Dorthy A. Wantz and
Dr. Gale.
The film "Michigan on the March"
will be shown after which the group
will join in community singing. Re-
freshments will be served.
All foreign students are urged to
attend this assembly, Dr. Gale em-
phasized.
Robert Clingers A re Hoyt
To Stork, and Baby Girl
Latest addition to the staff of the
International Center is a 7/2 pound
baby girl, born to Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Clinger.
Mr. Clinger is assistant director of
the International Center.
D AY
EANING
VICE
ROTECTION'"
CLEANERS
berty Street
DELIVERY - 8722

Pleflo To Be
M YIJAs Aim
.t
The University chapter of the
Michigan Youth for Democratic Ac-
tion will organize an "Anti-Franco",
campaign at a meeting at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the Union. All interested
studenls are invited.
Peu!. Jese M. Albaladejo of the
Spanish department will review ef-
forts of University students to pro-
mote aid for Loyalist Spain in 1936.
Scheduled for 3:30 p.m. tomorrow
is a MYDA membership meeting to
Swhicheveryone is invited, according
to the group executive committee.
'The campus organization is a mem-
ber of American Youth for Democ-
T 1%o Iloii' (i" i Ilans
Cuban students will be guests of
honor at the weekly International
Center tea from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Thurs-
day. Mrs. Philip Bursley will be
hostess.

Four prominent Detroiters, eye-
witnesses of the actual conditions in
Poland today, will give a first-hand
account of the wartime destruction
and the present situation in Poland
at 8 p.m. Thursday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The speakers will be presented by
the American Friends of Poland of
Ann Arbor and Detroit. They were
sent to Poland by the Detroit Polish
Democratic League, which is com-
posed of 33 social, civic and fraternal
organizations interested in the Pol-
ish situation.
American Citizen's Committee.
The four Detroiters, who com-
prised the American Citizens' Com-
mittee are State Senator Stanley No-
vak, representing the American Dem-
ocratic Council and the Wayne Coun-
ty CIO, State Representative Vincent
Klein, a delegate for the UAW-CIO
executive board, editor Henry Po-
dolski of the "Voice of the People,"
and Anthony Kar of the Hamtramck
schools, president of the Kosciuszko
League.

Senator Novak and RepresentativeI
Klein will discuss progress in the de-
velopment. of an industrial society in
Poland, and also the educational re-
forms. Podolski will indicate devel-
opments in the press and public rela-
tions, and Kar will show movies of
the widespread destruction in Poland
due to the war, and the progress in
reconstruction.
Formed Last October
The American Citizens Committee
was formed last October to investi-
gate the conflicting reports which
were reaching this country about the
conditions in Poland. In their seven-
week survey they went first to London
to investigate reports that Polish sol-
diers refuse to return to their home-

1)(4WiT8Eters To Give Talks on Poland Today

land. They found that 90 per cent
of the 60,000 Polish soldiers want to
go home but are being restrained.
In Poland, the committee was sup-
plied with an automobile, a scarce
commodity indeed, by the Polish gov-
ernment, and made an unobstructed
tour of the country. They investi-
gated the change from an agricul-
tural to an industrial economy in Po-
land, the standard of living, the in-
troduction of public schools following
the American lines, the food and fuel
problem, and other topics of interest
to Americans.
The Polish consul in Detroit, 01-
gren Langer, will accompany the
group. Time for discussion will be
alowed after the formal speeches.

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