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November 09, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHI-AN DAI LY MIDASv NoVEai iB9,194r

AID TO EX-SERVICEMEN:
Veterans' Bureau Answers Questions
Of Enrollment, Vocational Selection

Period of Leniency in Enforcing'
Car Regulations Over, Rea Says
All Driving Banned for Students Under 26;
Others Must Apply for Exemption in Person

Two 'U' Professors Return
After Testing Naval Airplanes

Problems and needs of ex-service-
men are fast becoming an old story
-with many new variations, however
-for the interviewers and certifica-
tion clerk at the Veterans Service
Bureau.
The staff, composed of two ex-serv-
icemen and two wives of veterans,
has interviewed veterans at the rate
of 100 a day during the last month.
The entering veteran meets several
members of the staff at the begin-
ning of his long trip through Univer-
sity offices as part of his registration.
After filling in a record sheet, he is
interviewed by Mrs. Dorothy Coons,
whose husband returned Saturday
after 30 months in Europe; or by
Mrs. Ruth McKevitt, wife of a vet-
eran now enrolled as a graduate here;
or Charles H. Peake, who served as
chief of an information-Education
section at a New Guinea base. Peake
is acting as assistant interviewer and
soon will assume his duties as coun-
selor.
Makes Appointments
These interviewers advise the vet-
eran on entrance problems and help

him decide whether he would receive
more benefits from Public Law 16 or
the G. I. Bill of Rights. Acting as a
referral agency, the Bureau makes
appointments with the Health Serv-
ice, the Dean of Students, or what-
ever office is wanted.
If the veteran has not decided what
field he wishes to enter, he may take
the General Counselling Tests, which
give an objective picture of his apti-
tudes, interests and weaknesses. A
psychologist interprets the tests with
him and suggests what courses are
advisable.
After interviewing is completed, the
veteran goes to Calvin Haugh, who
certifies to the government his enroll-
ment in the University in order that
his subsistence check be sent to him.
Haugh was a first lieutenant with
the 977th Field Artillery of the Fifth
Army in Africa and Italy.
Waiting Period
"After a veteran's enrollment has
been certified here, it takes 30 days
for the Veterans Administration at
Dearborn to process an application
and authorize entrance," Haugh

pointed out. "Under ideal conditions,
it is an additional six weeks before
the first subsistence check is re-
ceived."
To expedite registration for the ex-
serviceman, the University this year
paid for veterans' books and fees in
advance. By this means, 800 men
were enabled to enroll before they re-
ceived official Veterans Administra-
tion approval.
"During the rush of registration,
we answered many questions briefly,
and we ask that veterans come in now
to have their questions explained
more thoroughly and to file their per-
manent local addresses," Mrs. Coons,
chief interviewer, said.
State College Eases
Students' Car Banr
EAST LANSING, Nov. 8-(kP)-The
administration of Michigan State
College today announced a revision
of the student car ban on the M.S.C.
campus following a meeting at which
the college accepted modifications
recommended by a student-faculty
committee.
The car rules, as modified, allow
students to drive automobiles to for-
mal college parties and for other spe-
cial occasions at the discretion of the
college authorities. The arbitrary
age of 26 has been eliminated and
students were informed that the car
ban does not mean they cannot "ride"
in automobiles driven by non-stu-
dents.

The period of leniency in enforcing
University automobile regulations, oc-
casioned by difficulties in finding
rooms, is over and the regulations
will be rigidly enforced in the fu-
ture, assistant Dean of Students
Walter B. Rea announced today.
The regulations provide that full-
time students under 26 years of age
shall not drive automobiles except
for purposes approved by the Dean of
Students. Any act of driving without
first securing permission constitutes
grounds for disciplinary action.
Special Exemptions
Students whose circumstances
necessitate their operating cars for
family, commuting, business or health
purposes should apply without delay
at Room 2, University Hall for driv-
ing permits.
Students within the following
groups may apply for exemption:
1. Those who are 26 years of age
or older.
2. Those who are enrolled on R
part-time program, consisting of not
more than six hours in the Graduate
School or the Law School, or not more
than eight hours in any other School
or College.
3. Those who have a faculty rating
of instructor or higher.
Exemption Not Automatic
The exemption is not granted auto-
matically but is given only upon per-
sonal request, Dean Rea emphasized.
The ruling will remain in effect

throughout the entire academic year
except during certain vacation per-
iods, which will be announced in the
DOB by the administration.
Koella To Open
French Circle
Lecture Series
Prof. Charles E. Koella, director of
Le Cercle Francais will speak on "La
France et La Paix Mondial" at the
first meeting of the oldest language
club on campus, to take place Nov.
20 in the Assembly Room of the
Rackham Building.
During the course of the year Le
Cercle will offer a series of academic
French lectures and in the spring
will present a French play.
Meetings will be held bi-monthly.
Election of officers will probably take
place at the first meeting.
All students interested in joining
Le Cercle Francais should see Prof.
Koella at once. He may be reached
at 11 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, or at 3 p.m. Monday, Tues-
day, Thursday or Friday in his of-
fice, Rm. 412 Romance Language
Building.
Dean Edmonson to Attend
Inauguration of 'U' Head
Dean J. B. Edmonson, of the school
of education, left yesterday to repre-
sent the University at the inaugura-
tion of Sidney Earle Smith as new
president of the University of To-
ronto.
Dean Edmonson is co-chairman of
the Canada-United States Committee
on Education. While in Toronto he
will attend a two day conference with
Canadian members of the joint com-
mittee.
Buy Victory Bonds!

Housel To Instruct
In Civil Engineering
Having served three years super-
vising construction projects and de-
signing and testing airplanes in the
Navy, Prof. W. S. Housel has just re-
turned to his position in the Depart-
ment of Civil Engineering in the Col-
lege of Engineering.
Prof. Housel entered the Navy in
August, 1942. As assistant superin-
tending engineer at Norfolk, Va., he
had general supervision of a con-
struction project on the southeastern
part of the Atlantic seaboard.
Sent to Pearl Harbor
Moved to the west coast in Sep-
tember, 1943, Prof. Housel was sent
to Pearl Harbor three months later.
There he was successively assistant
director, executive officer and field
representative of the Pacific Division
of the Bureau of Yards and Docks.
This is the general administrative
agency of the Seabees stationed in
the Pacific.
Prof. Housel spent half of his time
in the field and half of it at the Pearl
Harbor headquarters. It was his job
to visit construction projects to find
out what they needed in materials
and personnel, to assist on special
problems, and to act as liaison with
procurement agencies on the main-
land.
Designs Airfields
Airport construction was Prof. Hou-
sel's job during his last year in the
Navy. He organized two field testing
laboratories and worked out various
features of the design of airfields,
roads and harbor development.
One of the units of Prof. Housel's
division went to Okinawa, and the
other was scheduled to participate in
the invasion of the Japanese main-
land. Before returning to the states
he worked on the design of airfields
for B-29's.
T. H, Tapping Will Speak
T. Hawley Tapping, secretary of the
Michigan Alumni Association, will
speak at a banquet to be given Satur-
day at the Emerson Hotel in Balti-
more, Md. at the conclusion of the
Michigan-Navy football game.

Conlon NQw Chairman
Of Aero Engineering
Prof. E. W. Conlon has returned to
the College of Engineering as chair-
man of the 'Department of Mronau-
tical Engineering after spending three
years testing and designing naval
airplanes.
Prof. Conlon entered the Navy in
January, 1942, with the rank of com-
mander. As a member of the engi-
neering branch of the Bureau of
Aeronautics,.he was in charge of the
structural development section which
determined strength requirements for
naval airplanes.
Praises Marine Pilots
"Flight testing formed an import-
ant part of the work of my section,"
Prof. Conlon said, "and we all had a
great deal of respect for the Marine
pilots. If a plane stood the test of
their flying, it was a good one.
"We found that the war moved very
rapidly," he continued, "for by the
time we got a new airplane ready,
combat conditions had changed con-
siderably and changes were manda-
tory. -It was our job to determine the
causes of failure and the remedies
for them."
Designs Fighter Plane
Prof. Conlon later went into the
fighter branch of naval aeronautics,
and was in charge of the design of
a fighter plane.
He expressed a particular interest
in jet-propelled airplanes. "I can
now see no limit to the speed of
aircraft," Prof. Conlon stated.

133i

Kelly Sets Tomorrow
Official Marine Corps,

:
l .
'-
;
4

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINI

LANSING, Nov. 8-(P)--Governor
Kelly today proclaimed Saturday,
Nov. 10, as Marine Corps Day in
Michigan to "acknowledge with
heartfelt gratitude their fidelity and
devotion and honor their gallantry
and courage."
We'ev Won the War-But
the Cost Goes On-Buy
Victory Bonds

as
Day

,.

7 "

(Continued from Page 4)
Concerts
Choral Union Concerts. The Cleve-
land Orchestra, Erich Leinsdorf, Con-
ductor, will give the second concert
in the Choral Union Series, Sunday
evening, Nov. 11, at 7 o'clock in Hill
Auditorium. The program will in-
clude:
Symphony No. 7 in E major....
........................Bruckner
Suite from the Ballet, "Appala-
chian Spring" .........Copland
"Bolero" ...................Ravel
A very limited number of tickets
are available for this concert. They
may be secured, so long as they last,
at the offices of the University Musi-
cal Society in Burton Memorial Tow-
er until noun Saturday. The Hill
Auditorium Box Office will be open
Sunday night after 5 o'clock.
Events Today
Armenian Students Association
will meet tonight at 7:30 in the Mich-
igan League. On the day of the meet-
ing look on the bulletin board at the
main desk for the specific room. All
students on campus of Armenian par-
entage are cordially invited to attend.
Coffee Hour: Today at 4:30 p.m.
the regular Lane Hall Coffee Hour will
be held. Students interested in the
religious activities on campus are in-
vited. Rerfreshments.
There will be a meeting of the cost-
supper committee at the Hillel Foun-
dation today at 3:30 p. m. All those
interested are invited.
Coming Events
Russky Kruzhok (Russian Circle)
will hold its first meeting of the
semester on Monday, Nov. 12, at 8:00
p.m. at the International Center.
All who are interested are cordially
invited.

ci

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meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 4:00
p.m. Anyone wishing to become a
member of this committee is urged
to attend. Anyone interested but
unable to attend at this time, call
2-6585 and leave your name.

a

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FRENCH SPANISH
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