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November 04, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUF MYCRI ' A 1v .n A 1'TV

TH~ T 1L rlITC A IT LA TT'

PAGE SEVEN

r
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i

Wolverine Eleven

OFF THE KEYBOARD
By MARY LU HEATH
Associate Sports Editor

hips Minnesota,26-0
VYerges, Weisenburger, Teninga,
22 KBentz Get Michigan Touchdowns

(Continued from Page I)

IT SEEMS a shame to sound a- sour note in the same issue of the Daily
which carries an account of the convincing 26-0 Michigan defeat of
Minnesota, and we are not wont to play teacher and shake an admonitory
finger. But we noticed yesterday afternoon that, while the team carried
out its part in the proceedings superlatively, the student body left much
to be desired in filling its own role as a cheering section.
Debates over the value of cheering on the actual performance of an
athletic squad have been going on as long as sports events have drawn
spectators. Many people supposedly in the know aver that, once a
game has begun, a player is unaware of sounds from the stands. Others
insist just as vehemently that cheering has a direct and appreciable
effect on the performance of an athlete. Whichever school of thought is
Aerreet, a good,-healthy attitude toward athletics by the student body a
team represents is one of the few ways in which a unified spirit can be
expressed in as large a school as Michigan.
Noting the return of many prewar activities to campus this semester,
along with the return of some of the male students who went into service
with their college work uncompleted, we went to Friday night's pep rally
expecting to see a similar upsurge of the spirit for which Big Ten schools
are noted. We were to be disappointed, however.
TlHE MAJORITY at the rally were freshmen, who came mainly out of
curiosity, and did not know the cheers. The result was group yelling
which lacked the depth that always denotes full participation. The bulk
of students-mainly upperclassmen-was not present to fill in the hollow
spaces.
At the game, we again hoped for some real cheering. The atmos-
phere was right for it. The view of the packed stands was right for it.
The team was right--and plenty right--for it. But the student cheering
section wasn't.
If the entire student body was present, and we would be willing to bet
that a good part of it was, it comprised almost one-eighth of the total
attendance. This many people should be enough to make at least a dent in
the constant hubbub from the stands which accompanied the game. But
the dent was infinitesimal, compared to the response given the cheerleaders
and trumpeters on the "Fight" cheers originating on the Minnesota side of
the field in the last half. When the visitors' side can outcheer the home
folks, it is time to do something about it.-
MANY STUDENTS, noting the lack of support, will try to blame it all on
the cheerleaders. Although a microphone to announce the cheers
would be an improvement over the present system, the cheerleaders have
apparently done everything else humanly possible to encourage cheering.
They have distributed printed copies of the yells at every game as a result
of the complaints by students who are unfamiliar with them. They have,
in slang terminology, practically "knocked themselves out" trying to put
the yells across. The student response has been disappointing, to say the
least. Ann Arbor High gets better support. for our money.
Don't be afraid to yell. If you start, others will join you in yout-
own section of the stands. Remember, you aren't attending Podunk
Normal (which cheers louder than you)-you are attending a Big Ten
school. You're right up there with the Historic Ivy League and the
Southern Conference.1
In postwar phraseology, "The team did its part. Did you?"
Uc

COOPERATION--Jack Weisenburger, fullback, (left) and Harold Watts,
center, (right) are symbolic of the unity between Michigan's line and
backfield, which caused the Gophers' downfall.
- ----- - - - ----- ------- - -
BROWN JUG HIGHLIGHTS:
Crisler Proud of Team's Play-
Laughs Off Bierman

1
1
t
i
j

-__-ting to the Michigan 36. Fonde ended
this threat by intercepting Williams'
were not disappointed in what they pass, the first Minnesota aerial of the
saw. Here's how it happened, game, and bringing the ball back to
Close Early Minutes the 38. The half ended after an-
Neither team was able to gain con- other exchange of punts.
sistently in the opening minutes of Michigan looked as if it might go
the game. A 16-yard jaunt by Tom all the way after taking the kickoffj
Cates, hard-running Gopher scat- opening the second half and parading
back, on the second play from scrim- down to the Minnesota 18. A holding
mage, was nullified by a penalty, and penalty set them back to the 38,
Minnesota was forced to kick. however, and the threat was com-
The Wolverines could not gain pletely stopped when Dick Van Dusen
either, and Weisenburger punted to snared Yerges' pass at the 23.
Merlin Kispert, who got back to his Line Holds
own 31. The Gophers were able to The Gophers started still another
make a first down this time, with drive, getting down to the Michigan'
Cates again breaking away for a size- 30, this time as they seemed to gain
able gain, but could not sustain the almost at will in the middle of the
drive. field. But the Michigan line again
Quarterback Sneak held when it had to, and the ball went
Another exchange of punts, and the over.
Wolverines got their first goalward After an exchange of punts, the'
drive underway. Judd Ringer's short Wolverines were on the march once
punt was downed on the Michigan again, and this time they took the
35. Teninga's pass to Fonde fell in- ball all the way, starting onthe 46,
complete, but Weisenburger spun over Michigan crossed the goal line in six
center for a first down at the 48. plays.
Weisenburger's thrust at center was Two Quick Ones
stopped cold. Yerges, subbing for After a pass failed, Minnesota was
the injured Joe Ponsetto at quarter- penalized 15 yards for unnecessaryl
back, then passed to Teninga, who roughness. That seemed to be the
got to the 28 before he was tackled. spark Michigan needed, for Fonde
Weisenburger got another first on then tore off 15 yards on a reverse,
the 17 from where Yerges passed to!Weisenburger got four and Fonde
Hank Fonde, who was downed on the reached the 12 on the next play. On
one-foot line. Yerges went over on a the play following Weisenburger split
quarterback sneak. the Minnesota guards for the score.
Bob Callahan's placement was per- Callahan again converted. a
fect, and the Wolverines led, 7-0. The Wole rine soei agand the
Kulbitski Power the ball. A short Minnesota punt to:
Minnesota attempted a comeback its own 38 gave them the opnortunity,

and they were quick to take advan-
tage of it.
Two line plays failed, but a Ten-
inga to Ford pass clicked to the 22.
Teninga thentbroke off tackle and
ran through the whole Gopher sec-
ondary on a beautiful twisting run
before stepping out of bounds on the
five. He scored two plays later from
the three. Callahan's kick was wide
this time.
Robinson Passes
Just to make it convincing, the
Wolverines scored again in the dying
moments of the game. The Gophers,
aided by a penalty, stopped one threat
on the three-yard line after Dan
Dworsky had bulled his way down to
the 14 from the Minnesota 46.
After they got the ball again on
their own 44, the Wolverines putit
over in just two plays. Robinson first
passed to Ed McNeill on the 12 and
then to Warren Bentz in the end
zone. George Chiames' kick was wide.
Lineups

Michigan Coach Fritz Crisler shed
his normal reserved air in the dress-
ing room after the game. There was
a grin on his face a mile wide as he
said, "I'm awfully proud of the boys.
They all played great games. It was
our best of the season.",
Minnesota Coach BerniegBierman
was not so happy. "Michigan has a
very good young ball club," he re-
marked. "Fritz has a large number
of good players, enough to out-man
most teams."
Regarding the purely friendly
feud between the two coaches, both
took it as a joke. Bierman, who
had never lost to a Michigan eleven
since Crisler began coaching here,
m.rely said, "I guess he's been sav-
ing it up all these years." Crisler
just smiled.
Neither team reported any serious
injuries, although many men had to
be helped from the field during the
game. Hank Fonde, Michigan right
half, suffered a charley-horse, and
quarterback Howard Yerges, hurt his
ankle. No Minnesota man was seri-
ously hurt.
* * *
Press box onlookers were unani-
mous in their praise of the sterling
defensive work of Dan Dworsky, who
came in to back up the line on de-
fense. Other Wolverine standouts
included end Lennie Ford, center
Harry Watts, and guard Dom Tomasi.
Quarterback Howard Yerges also drew
comment for his fine signal-calling.
Don Robinson, who last played
for Michigan in 1942, made his first
appearance of the season since his
service discharge, a spectacular one
as he completed two successive long
passes for the Wolverines' last
touchdown. Robinson has been
shifted from halfback to quarter
because of a weak knee.

Leading Michigan ground-gainer
was Jack Weisenburger, who totalled
70 yards in 15 tries. Walt Teninga
got 50 in 10 carries. For the Goph-
ers, big Vic Kulbitski led the parade
with 64 yards in 19 attempts.
Some spectator tossed what looked
like an orange smoke bomb onto the
field after Michigan's third touch-
down. Cheerleaders finally corralled
the missile after it had temporarily
blotted from view the whole north
end of the stadium.
The crowd of 85,132 spectators
was the second largest in Michigan
history. The largest, 86,408, saw
the Wolverines lose to Notre Dame
in 1943.
Michigan utilized a novel kickoff
formation to make up for the absence
of Joe Ponsetto, who regularly does
the job. Jack Weisenburger did the
honors, booting the ball fiat on the
ground with no one holding it. The
maneuver was successful as the pig-
skin bounded and twisted its 'way
down the field time after time to
reach the deep Minnesota backs.

MICHIGAN
Hershberger
Johnson
Tomasi
Watts
Wilkins
Hinton
Renner
Yerges
Teninga
Nussbaumer
Weisenburger

POS
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

MINNESOTA
Ringer
Fitch
Graiginger
Van Dusen
Hanzlik
Westrum
Carley
Rappana
Cates
Kispert
Kulbiski

on the next series of plays after
Cates had returned the kickoff 30
yards to midfield. With big Johnny
Kulbitski ramming through center
for most of the yardage, the Gophers
penetrated to the Michigan 16 before
the Wolverines stiffened and held for
downs.
Michigan came right back withra
drive of its own, running up two first
downs as Pete Elliott found holes over
the Gopher tackles. The march fiz-
zled at the Minnesota 38, however,
and Weisenburger kicked out of
bounds on the 19.
Attack Fizzles
Again the Gophers, with Kulbitski
still pounding through center, engi-
neered a potential scoring thrust, get-

1 71mm

Isco COKED.'WPAG
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Statistics
Mich. Minn.
First Downs .............. 19 11
Rushing ................ 11 7
Passing ................. 5 3
Penalties...............3 1
Yards Rushing..........261 134
Yards Passing ............131 31
Passes Attempted .........15 8
Passes Completed ..........6 3
Passes Intercepted by .... 2 1
Punts (number............ 6 8
Punting Average.......... 33 32.4

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Yards All Kicks Returned

44 791

Fumbles ...........
Yards Penalized ... .

50

2
55

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