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February 10, 1946 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-02-10

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PAGE EIGl l7'r

TIL MCHIGAJ N DILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1948

FOUR YEARS' ACTIVITY:

R a karn Memorial in Detrojit
'II Hold Opyen House Tuesday

Th
of Un
Educe
be ce
house
the b
tiont

e compietion of tour fulu years
iversity activity at the Rackham
ticnalMemorial in Detroit will
elebrated Tuesday by an open
in which all the facilities of
uilding will be open for insepc-
to interested persons.

1Iackhamfl Builaing Is Center
All University extension work in
Detroit has centered at the Rackham
Building since it was dedicated and
occupied on Jan. 28, 1942.
Graduates and students of the Uni-
versity and present and former ex-
HiohhIohts
On Campus
Speech Assembly . . .
The aims, objectives and work of
the Speech Clinic's program will be
explained and demonstrated at the
last Department of Speech assembly
for this term at 4 p.m. Wednesday in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Members of the Speech Clinic staff
will tell about the aims and work of
the clinic, according to Prof. Harlan
Bloomer, director of the clinic. Sev-
eral clinical patients will take part
in the program in order to demon-
strate various phases in remedial
speech.
Attendance at the assembly is re-
quired for all majors in the depart-
ment.
Cohen To Lecture...
The final lecture in the "Judaism
in Transit" series will be given at
7:45 p.m. tomorrow at B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation by Rabbi Jhu-
dah M. -Cohen, director of the
Foundation.
In his lecture Rabbi Cohen will
take up contemporary problems of
Judaism, including a discussion of
Zionism and of the Jew in the
present economic scene.
Sigma Xi To Meet . .
The Society of Sigma Xi will hold a
symposium on the control of com-
municable diseases at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day in the School of Public Health
auditorium.
Professors Thomas Francis, Jr.,
Gordon C Brown, Richard J. Proter
and Gerald M. Ridenour will present
material on various phases of the
subject, including information on
poliomyelitis, malaria and influenza.
Refreshments will be served and
some of the research facilities in the
building will be open for inspection
after the program. The public is in-
vited to attend the symposium.
French Club Lecture .. .
"The Ideas of a French Philoso-
pher on Education in the United
States" will be the subject of the
French lecture to be given by Prof.
Arthur L. Dunham at 4:15 p.m.
Thursday in Rm. D. Alumni Me-
morial Bal.,
Dr. Liu To Lecture . . .
"Democratic Developments in
China Today" will be the subject of a
lecture to be given at 4 p.m. Wednes-
day in Kellogg Auditorium by Dr.
Bangee Alfred Liu, former president
of China Training Institute near
Nanking.
Dr. Liu, who is now acting director
of the Chinese News Service speakers
bureau, presented a series of special
lectures at the University during the
Summer term of 1942. He has trav-
elled extensively as a lecturer in the
United States and Canada.
Dr. Littell T o Speak . .
Dr. Franklin TI. Littell, Director
of the Student Religious Associa-
tion, will speak at the Annual
Youth Banquet of the Dexter Com-
munity Consul of Churches at 6:30
p.m. tomorrow in St. Andrews Ev-
angelico and Reformed Church.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

I II
(Continued from Page 4)
regular Sunday morning worship at
10:30.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
109 S. Division St. Wednesday eve-
ning service at 8 p.m. Sunday morn-
ing service at 10:30 a.m. Subject:
"Spirit." Sunday school at 11:45
a.m.
A special reading room is main-
tained by this church at 706 Wolver-
ine Bldg., Washington at Fourth,
where the Bible, also the Christian
Science Textbook, "Science and
Health with Key to the Scriptures"
and other writings by Mary Baker
Eddy may be read, borrowed or pur-
chased. Open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11:30 a.m. to 5
p.m.

tension students are especially in-
vited to bring their families and
friends to the open house.
One of the features being planned
to illustrate the work of the Exten-
sion Service is a special session of
Prof. Wesley Maurer's discussion
group on "Books on Current Eco-
nomic, Political and Social Problems."
The book to be discussed is "The New
Veteran" by Charles Bolte, and the
regular members of the group are be-
ing asked to bring veterans as their
guests.
Varied Entertainments Offered j
Concerts by the Detroit extension
band and orchestra, Prof. David
Owen's class in radio reading and
dramatics, two current courses in the
pragram on automobile body engi-
neering, an informal lecture and dis-
cussion on some topic of interest to
gardeners, and a lecture on nature
study by Walter Nickell of the Cran-
brook Institute of Science will also
be open to the public.

Hiear Knu dsen
The eighth annual Michigan Fore-
men's Conference, to be held Friday,
March 1, at the Rackham Educa-
tional Memorial in Detroit under the
sponsorship of the University Exten-
sion Service, will feature an address
by Lt. Gen. William S. Knudsen.
Gen. Knudsen's tentative subject
is "The Outlook for Business."
The Foremen's Conference is at-
tended by industrial foremen of man-
ufacturing concerns in the Detroit
area and southeastern Michigan. An
attendance of approximately 1,250
foremen is expected.
A group of 12 smaller conferences
on topics of interest to foremen and
other supervisors will be held simul-
taneously at 2 p.m. and repeated at
3:30 p.m., so that every foreman will
have a chance to attend two confer-
ences.
Included in these conferences will
be a panel discussion on "What the
Foreman Should Know About the Re-
turned Veteran's Needs."

13y 'rule Assci:ted TIi s
HAMILTON, Bermuda, Feb. 9-
American and British officials, in
three weeks of negotiations here,
have written a charter for air com-
merce which may set a pattern for
the world.
The agreement-now awaiting ap-
proval in Washington and London-
embodies in large measure the free-
dom of the air that was championed
by the United States at Chicago in
1944.

Each nation may

wishes, as often as it wishes, so long
as it observes regulations designed to
prevent both cut-rate wars and fare
grounds.
Asalient feature of the draft
agreement is a provision for quick
consultation between the two gov-
ernments when one feels that the"
others' airlines are cutting unfair-
ly into its traffic.
There seems to be no question that
the agreement as written is entirely

fly where

it

NEGOTIATIONS FOR FREEDOM OF THlE SKIES:
UJ.S.-Gt. Brita ini Air Cha rter Awaits Approval; May Set World Pattern

a

acceptable to Washington, but some-
what less certainty exists with re-
spect to London.
The United States demanded com-
plete freedom of the skies, permitting
open competition to assure to the
traveling public fair charges and safe,
satisfactory service. The British
wanted full control of prices, routes
and the number of flights scheduled.
Since the opening session of the
conference, all meetings have been
private. Here, however, are some of

the major points learned from par-
ticipants on' both sides bf the dis-
cussions:-
Fares will be fixed for the first year
by international airline operators
through their own organization, meet-
ing in New York about March 1.
There will be no limitation on the
number of flights or the number of
seats sold on a flight. The right is
granted to pick up traffic in one
country and carry it to another
country along the route.

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1

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