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November 02, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

New Lutheran Student Center
To Hold Open House Saturday

The Lutheran Student Association
of the Zion and Trinity Lutheran
Churches has extended an invitation
to students to attend on open house
this Saturday after the game and for
the evening at the newly purchased
Lutheran Student Center, 1304 Hill
street.
This student association is a mem-
ber of the National Lutheran Student
Association which directs the work of
students on more than three hundred
campuses throughout the U n i t e d
States andCanada.
Officers .of the local Association
are: John Anderson, USN, President;
Jean Gringle, vice-president; Lenora
Bandkau, secretary; and Frank Ri-
zarddi, treasurer. ,
One of the oldest groups on cam-
pus, the Lutheran Student Associa-
tion was first started by the Rev. and
Mrs. Ernest C. Stellhorn in the fall
of 1917. For the past 14 years, the
Rev. Henry O. Yoder has served as
pastor for Lutheran students, and he
is continuing in that capacity this
year.
The work among the students is
sponsored jointly by the Zion and
Trinity Lutheran Churches of the

city. All activities for the students,
with the exception of worship, take
place at the Center. -

' Offers Auto
Design Course
For Detroiters
First Series of Four
Will Begin Nov. 12
A course in automobile body design,
the only one of its kind in the coun-
try, is being given at the University
Extension Service Building in De-
troit, under the joint sponsorship of
the University College of Engineer-
ing and Extension Service and the
Society of Automotive Engineers.
The series of four non-credit clas-
ses are designed to give the student
instruction in the theory and prac-
tice of body engineering. The first
series will begin the week of Nov. 12.
Classes will be given in advanced
descriptive geometry, under Prof. F.
H. Smith; art, design, principles, and
styling, by Prof. Avard Fairbanks;
body design, by Prof. W. E. Lay and
Mr. E. H. Vallincourt; and a general
lecture course, by Prof. Lay and oth-
er lecturers.
A steering committee of outstand-
ing body engineers of the automotive
industry has been assisting in the or-
ganization of the program and devel-
opment of the course outlines.

Three Romance
Language Profs
Rejoin Faculty
Three University faculty members
in the Department of Romance Lang-
uagesthave resumed teaching duties
here this semester.
After an absence of some twenty
years, Dr. F. M. Thompson has re-
turned to the Spanish department
faculty to take charge of all work
concerning the enlarged University
Portugese program.
Dr. James C. O'Neill, who served
in the Army Signal Corps at the
Signal Security Agency in Arlington
Hall, Virginia, has returned to the
staff of the French department after
an absence of three years.
Dr. Francis W. Gravit, who served
in a civilian capacity with the Office
of Chief of Naval Operations in Wash-
ington, also has returned to the
French faculty after a three-year
leave of absence.

Prof. Roy W. Cowden, director of
the Hopwood Room, estimates that at
least 20 University students are writ-
ing novels this year, a substantial in-
crease over previous years.
The Hopwood Room is the center,
of campus creative literature activ-
ity and houses past wining entries
in Hopwood literary contests as
well as many current novels and
periodicals. The room is designed
fer all college students and is espe-
cially populated by English and
journalism students.
Winners of Hopwood contests in
the past are seeing their work in
print this fall. Fynette Fiske Rowe,
who won the only major award in fic-
tion in 1934, with a novel, "The
Chapin Sisters," has had her book
published by A. A. Wyn.
"The Task," a volume of poetry
written by Robert Bhain Campbell,
a major Hopwood winner in poetry

in 1937, has been published post-
humcusly by Farrar Rinehart. The
foreward has been written by Nor-
man Rosten, a Hopwood winner in
both major poetry and drama in
1938.
"Indian Paul," a first novel, made
its appearance early this fall. It was
written by John Moore, a major poe-
try winner in 1936 and is his first
published work.
Arthur Miller, a winner of minor

HOPWOOD ROOM POPULATED:
20 'U' Student Writers Working on Novels

awards in drama in both 1936 and
1937, has written a new book,
"Focus," published by R e y n a I
Hitchcock Oct. 30. Miller's varied
career includes another book, "Sit-
uation Normal," and work in radio,
writing, and background work for
the movie, "Ernie Pyle."
John Sessions, a minor winner in
fiction last spring, has had two of
his prize winning stories accepted for
publication in the Atlantic Monthly.

LISTEN
to Bob Ufer's
SPORTS REVIEW
12:30-12:45 Daily
Sponsored by

',t '
IM

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

MARSHALL'S and WITHAM'S Drugs

ill

REV. HENRY O. YODER I
Pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church

i

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

FRI., NOV. 2, 1945
7:30-Sleepyhead Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:15-Meet the Band.
8:25-Women Today.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Wake Up and Live.
9:00-Music Box.
9:30-Popular Music.
9:40-News.
9:45-Moments of Melodies.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15-What Do You Know?
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Community Calendar.

10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00--News.
11:05-Al & Lee Reiser.
11:15-Lean Back & Listen.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
11:55-College & Martial Airs
12:00--News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Today's Band.
12:30-Along the Sports
Sidelines.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Organ Music (Pop.)
1:15-South American Way.
1:30-Woody Herman.
1:45-Dinah Shore.

2:00-News.
2:05-Hal Saunders.
2:15-Lawrence Welk.
2:45-Ray Block's Orch.
3:00-News.
3:05-Arthur Chapman.
3:15-University of !Iichi-
gan.
3:30-Flashes From Life.
3:40-It Actually Happened.
.:45-Mystery Melodies.
4:00-News.
4:15-Little Show.
4:30-Meet Me at Morays.
4:45-Dixie Quiz.
5:00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10-Hollywood Reporter.

I

(Continued from Page 4)
Mathematics Concentrates: The
Mathematics Concentration Exami-
nation will be held Tuesday, Nov. 6,
at 4:00 p.m. in room 3011 Angell Hall.
Concerts
Paul Robeson, baritone, assisted by
William Schatzkamer, pianist; and
accompanied at the piano by Law-
rence Brown, will give the opening
concert in the Choral Union Series
Saturday night, Nov. 3, at 8:30, in
Hill Auditorium.
The second concert will be given by
the Cleveland Orchestra, Erich Leins-
dorf, Conductor, Sunday, Nov. 11, at
7 o'clock sharp (on account of broad-
cast); and at later dates the following
additional concerts will be provided:
Alexander Uninsky, Pianist-Nov.
19.,
Jennie Tourel, Contralto-Nov. 27.
Don Cossack Chorus, Serge Jaroff,
Conductor-Dec. 3.
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge
Koussevitzky, Conductor-Dec. 10.
Heifetz, Violinist-Jan. 18.
Chicago Symphony, Desire Defauw,
Conductor-Jan. 31.
Artur Schnabel, pianist-Feb. 13.

Detroit Symphony, Karl Krueger,
Conductor-Mar. 11.
Tickets for the Paul Robeson con-
cert have been exhausted but a limit-
ed number of tickets for several of
the other concerts are available at
the offices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Memorial Tower;
and immediately before the respective
concerts at the box office in Hill
Auditorium.
Exhibitions
Michigan Historical Collections, 160
Rackham Building. Freshman days,
1843-1945.
Rackham Building, exhibition
rooms. Materials from the University
War Collection, Nov. 2-5.
Events Today
SOIC executive council will meet
4:15 p.m. today third floor union.
Imperative that heads or delegates of
membership organizations attend.
Orientation coffee hour: This aft-
ernoon, 4:30 to 6:00 at the Student
Religious Association-Lane Hall lo-
cated at Washington and State St.

The Women of the Faculty of the
University of Michigan will meet for
dinner tonight at 6:30 in the Rus-
sian Tea Room of the Women's
League. Plans for the coming year
will be made.
Faculty members will secure their
trays in the cafeteria.
Delta Tau Delta Fraternity will
hold its first meeting of the fall term
tonight at seven o'clock in the Mich-
igan Union. Room number will be
posted on the Union bulletin board.
Any veterans who are Delts are urged
to attend.
Sabbath Eve religious services will
be held this evening at 7:45 at the
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation, 730
Haven. A social hour will follow the
services, and everyone is cordially
invited to attend.
Corning Events

HOLD THOSE WAR BONDS!

To all house presidents: There will_
be an important meeting of Inter-
fraternity Council on Tuesday, Nov. 6,
at 7:15 in Room 306 Michigan Union.
All houses are urged to have a rep-
resentative present at this meeting.

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY - 8:30 P.M.
Admission 42c
BOX OFFICE OPEN at 2:00 P.M.

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