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November 02, 1945 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-02

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Y, NOVEMBER 2, 1945

THE' MICHIGAN DAIL. ~ U Y U UA.2

rAGE THREN

- i a x :u i eTHE iML ii V'AN flAVIIV1L

PAGE THREE

OFF THE LYBOARD
By MARY LU HEATH
Associate Sports Editor
117HE UNORTHODOX football viewed by last Saturday's Western Confer-
ence fans, including two surprising upsets which knocked any thoughts
of a walk-away Big Ten race into a cocked hat, led many Monday morning
quarterbacks to scurry for their psychology books this week.
- Unable to explain the 20-7 comeback of Ohio State against the cur-
rently Ann Arbor-bound Gophers, after the Buckeyes had suffered a
morale-shattering 35-13 trouncing at the hands of the Purdue power-
house the week before, the dopesters blamed it all on the psychological.
The even more startling 26-14 Northwestern upset of the Boilermakers
was the cause of more fretting among the sages.
This explanation, although often used much too glibly, was very prob-
ably the reason for at least one oddity in Big Ten competition Saturday-
the failure of the favored Wolverines to score against the Illini until the
final quarter of the homecoming game at Champaign. The Michigan squad
came to life to score three rapid-fire touchdowns only after their captain
and two-year field general, Joe Ponsetto, suffered a wrenched knee and had
to be carried from the gridiron cn a, stretcher. The squad apparently took a
last-minute opportunity to show their appreciation of Ponsetto's fine leader-
ship.
A POSSIBLE explanation of the Ohio State comeback against the Gophers
was suggested by an Associated Press scribe which appeared as a side-
light of the game. Buckeye Coach Carroll Widdces' two sons, both of gram-
mar-school age, were injured in an automobile accident during the week,
and the smallest boy was in serious condition at the kickoff. He was con-
scious enough to beg for a radio to hear about the progress of his dad's
team. It is not at all improbable that the determination of a grim OSU
squad to win Saturday was increased several-fold by the necessity of helping
to relieve their coach's anxiety.
F ,1

Minnesota Tilt Greatly Effects Title Chase
-)

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10 VITAL TOPICS

Navy Primed
For Irish Tilt
Middies' Spirits Soar
After Defeating Penn
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 1--(P)-
Critics attribute Navy's poor and in-
different play this fall on the grid-
iron to low morale and discontent in
the football ranks today and assert
without qualification that Dick Du-
den should get all the credit if the
Midshipmen pull together against
Notre Dame with rejuvenated spirit.
Capt. C. O. Humphreys, Navy Di-
rector of Athletics, said today "We
have known there has been some-
thing wrong and we have been try-
ing to put a finger on it, but we
haven't been able to determine
whether it was with direction of the
team, among the players or what. We
have heard sharp criticism and we
know the squad has not lived up to
potentialities or expectations."
Spirits of the players are on the
rise this week as preparations go for-
ward for the Notre Dame clash, con-
tinuing from the final moments of
the comeback triumph over Penn
last Saturday.
"I do feel honestly that we will
click. Some of the coaches are pes-
simistic and for what reason, I don't
know," said Humphreys. "The play-
ers, however, are confident and have
a desire to win, heretofore lacking."
Duden, left end and Captain, was
given full credit for the lift in mor-
ale and for the explosive drive that
pulled the Penn game out of the fire
after the Middies trailed with only
eight minutes left.
Football.. .
(Continued from Page 1)
1945 Minnesota outfit packs its real
wallop. Headed by Vic Kulbitski, 200
pounds of pile-driving fullback, the
Gophers have a corps of backs able
to hold its own with the best of them.
At left half is Wayne (Red) Wil-
liams, a hard runner and very cap-
able passer. Flanking him is Johnny
Lundquist, a speed merchant who
specializes in end plays. Quarterback
is in the capable hands of Merlin Kis-
pert, 190-pound blocking back who
also passes when the Gophers use the
T formation.°
Yerges Replaces Ponsetto
To combat this array of speed and
power, Michigan Coach Fritz Crisler
has sent his charges through a week
of stiff offensive and defensive drills.
Several new plays and formations
have been added to the Wolverines'
bag of football tricks, indicating that
Minnesota may be in for a few sur-
prises Saturday.
Biggest job of the week was to find
a replacement for team captain and
quarterback Joe Ponsetto, injured
during Michigan's 19-0 triumph over
Illinois. Howard Yerges, Ponsetto's
understudy, has been selected to fill
the role by virtue of his fine per-
formance in leading his mates to
three touchdownsdagainst the Ilini.
Callahan Returns
In case it is necessary to relieve
Yerges, Crisler has had several of his
backfield men working at quarter
along with their regular duties at
other positions. Fullback Dan Dwor -
sky and halfbacks Pete Elliott and
Don Robinson could all step into the
breach if needed.
The placekicking situation took a
turn for the better yesterday when
Bob Callahan, number two toe artists
on the squad, appeared ready for
service with his leg injury mending
rapidly. Ponsetto regularly handles
kickoffs a n d points-after-touch-
down.

Tackle Bob Derleth, who also was
hurt in the Illinois game, is back at
his position and will play Saturday.
Robinson, recently discharged from
service, has been coming along rap-
idly at right halfback and may see
some action there, along with possi-
ble quarterbacking duties.

VIC KULBITSKI is Lack again,
which means trouble for the Wol-
verines. Big and rugged Vic has
been key man at fullback for the
Gophers this year.
A P Flashes
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1-(AP)-An
investigation was promised today
into allegations by Senator Langer
(R.-N.D.) that Army-Navy foot-
ball game tickets are falling into
the hands of scalpers while service
men are unable to purchase them.
Langer also asked that the an-
nual service contest be played free
of charge and that it be held in a
different state each year on an
alphabetical, basis, starting in Ala-
bama next year.
* * *
DETROIT, Nov. 1 - (R) - George
Millard Trautman, 55-year-old minor
league baseball executive who for 10
years has served as president of the
American Association, today accepted
the position as general- manager of
the Detroit Tigers, succeeding John
A. Zeller who will retire. Jan. 1.
Owner Walter O. Briggs, whose
Tigers only a month ago won the
America League pennant an1d beat
the Chicago Cubs in the World Series,
said that Trautman was tendered the
position as general manager because
his successful background as a base-
ball executive "best fitted him to
serve as Zeller's successor."
CHICAGO, Nov. 1-OP)-Two ma-
jor league castoffs, outfielders Lou
Novikoff and Frank Demaree, top-
ped a slim list of nine minor league
players grabbed in the annual base-
ball draft today.
Demaree, 35-year old veteran of
Portland in the Pacific Coast
League, was the No. 1 selection,
being picked by the last-place Phil-
adelphia Athletics of the American
League.
Novikoff, who batted .318 for Los
Angeles last season before enter-
ing the Army, was picked second by
the Philadelphia Phillies, National
League tail-enders.

Race for Crown In Turmol;
Five Teams Can Take Honors

By WALT KLEE
There is more at stake tomorrow
afternoon when the Maize and Blue
face the Golden Gophers than the
possession of the Little Brown Jug,
for a defeat for either team will vir-
tually eliminate its chances for a
Conference Crown.
Both Bernie Bierman and Fritz
Crisler, respective coaches for the two
teams, have their eyes set on a vic-
tory. They know that two defeats in
Conference play would be almost im-
possible to overcome.
Before the last whistle blows on
the last Saturday in November, Min-
nesota still must face undefeated In-
diana and Wisconsin, while Michi-
gan has the almost unsurmountable
task of winning games from Purdue
and Ohio State on successive weeks.
November Tells the Tale
The three games to be played in
Ann Arbor this month will probably
decide many things in the Conference
standings. Not only Michigan's place
in the league but the places of the
four other teams in the race for the
title will be affected.
As things stand now, Bo McMillin's
Hoosiers are out in front with succes-
sive victories over Michigan, Iowa
and Illinois and a tie with North-
western. Ohio State and Purdue, in
a tie for second, have a like number
of wins, but losses also mar their
records.
The Buckeyes have taken the
measure of Wisconsin, Minnesota,
and Iowa but have lost to the Boiler-
makers. Purdue has beaten Ohio
State, in a startling upset, Iowa, and
Illinois, but had the tables turned
on them last Saturday at Evanston.
Minnesota Breaks Even
Michigan's Big Ten record in-
cludes wins over Northwestern and
Illinois and the loss to Indiana. Min-
nesota has a .500 record with a win
over Northwestern and the loss to
Carroll Widdoes' charges.
With the leading teams engaging
each other in a sort of round robin
affair, the eventual outcome probably
won't be known for four weeks yet,
and it is possible that the picture will
All students, except first seme-
ster freshmen and others ineligible
for University activities, who wish
to try out for the Daily sports staff
should come to the sports desk,
Student Publications Building, be-
tween the hours of 3 and 5 p. m.
Monday, Nov. 5.
The sports staff offers experi-
ence in writing, page makeup, and
other phases of newspaper work.
No previous journalistic experi-
ence is necessary. Women, as well
as men, are welcome. All we ask
is that the tryout show an interest
in sports and in the work done at
the Daily.
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 6615

change on each Saturday in Novem-
ber.
In addition tothe gmes to be
played in Ann Arbor thec last two
weeks in November, Indiana will
meet their first real opposition since
Michigan when they face Purdue and
Minnesota. Ohio State, in addition to
Michigan, must face the rejuvenated
Northwestern Wildcats. And as has
been said before Purdue still has
Minnesota and Michigan on its slate.
With so much riding on the out-
come of each'tilt all teams will have
to be at their peak, as on each Satur-
day some of them will fall by the
wayside. Even if put out of the race,
the losing team will be able to re-
cover lost prestige by coming back to
win.

Franks Leaves
Health Service,
Joins Kuzma
Julius Franks, Michigan's great
All-American guard in 1942 and a
star of many a Wolverine victory on
the gridiron, won the greatest battle
of his life when he was discharged
from University Hospital after an 18-
months' fight against tuberculosis.
Franks re-enrolled in the Univer-
sity Dental School and began at-
tending classes yesterday. Although
his football career is ended, he will
resume the life of a normal college
student.
Tom Kuzma, Wolverine halfback
and a teammate of Franks, also con-
fined to the hospital with tuberculosis,
was discharged several months ago.
He too has returned to school.

10 DISTINGUISHED

SPEAKERS

Opening TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 8:30

LEAVES THE GR OU ND
A bonier crew needs trainhiig as a team. And now
those hazards which are too dangerous for air-borne
drill can be. duplicated on the ground. This is made
possible by an electronic flight trainer perfected by
Bell Telephone Laboratories' scientists for the Navy.
At remote controls the instructor follows the
"flight," sets up viarious dangerous conditions, coor-
dinates the crew's reactions.
Tubes glow, switches click unch as they do in a
telephone exchange, to dulplicate such flight perils as
icing, fouled fuel lines, "conked" motors. It is the
science behind the telephone that here performs an-
other new service to the Nation.
.ELL TELEPHONE Y['EM

LISTEN
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SPORTS REVIEW
12:30-12:45 Daily
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MARSHALL'S and WITHAP

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to the Nation In Peace and War"

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BILL a"

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All freshmen and sophomores
who wish to try out for football
manager are requested to call
Senior Manager Bob Keselring
at 9158. Both Navy men and
civilians who are managers will
be excused from P.E.M.

AND HIS BAND

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CONGRESSWOMAN FROM CALIFORNIA
AND FORMER STAR OF STAGE AND SCREEN
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Tickets: $1.20, 90c, 60c (tax ind.)
COMPLETE COURSE: Nov. 6, Mrs. Douglas; Nov. 28, Owen
Lattimore, "Solution in Asia"; Dcc. 5, Vincent Shecan, "Per-
sonal Opinion"; Dec. 11, Richard Wright, "The American
Negro Discovers Himself"; Jan. 16, Frances Perkins, "The
Destiny of Labor in America"; Feb. 5, Madame Vijaya Lakshmi
Pandit, "The Coming Indian Democracy"; Feb. 15, Guthrie
McClintic, The Theater, Reminiscences and Predictions";
March 5, Edmund Stevens, "Russia Is No Riddle"; March 12,

COOPERS SOX

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