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February 02, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE ','X

TIE MICIIC,1AN DAILY

SA tURii% A , F'E TARY 2t, 1616

NEWAMMENIMIMMOM

a

PRESS PICTURE NEWS

Church News

E" 't
.r . - - -

Student gatherings and religious
services are planned for tomorrow by
Ann Arbor churches.
Dr. W. P. Lemon will speak on the
topic "Wounds of a Friend" at the
10:45 a.m. service in the PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH.
Members of the WESTMINSTER
GUILD will meet at 5 p.m. in the so-
cial hall of the Presbyterian church
for a discussion program. Orhan
Baykal's subject will be "Turkey: Its
Hopes and Aspirations."
EARLY SPRING?
Pennsylvanians
To Air Dispute
On Ground Hog
By The Associated Press
QUARRYVILLE, Pa., Feb. 1 -
Pennsylvania's three best known
ground hog locals (non-affiliated) to-
morrow face their annual jurisdic-
tional dispute on the weather predic-
tion for the next six weeks with the
outcome a doubtful shadow.
Lodge members at Quarryville,
Punxsutawney and Allentown agree
only if their respective woodchuck
mascots see their shadows on Feb. 2-
American variation of Candlemas
Day-there will be six more weeks of
winter. Otherwise, an early spring is
in the offing.
But there's seldom a unanimous
forecast.
Prepping for the event, the Quarry-
ville outfit offered its forecasting sys-
tem to the United Nations Organiza-
tion if UNO will use it for "peaceful
purposes" only. Gobbler's Knob
Lodge at Punxsutawney foresaw a
"practical" settlement of the steel
strike after gaining esteem a year ago
through prediction the war would end
in 1945..
Gobbler's Knob Lodge claims a 50-
year existence. Dr. F. A. Lorenzo,
spokesman, says the Punxsutawney
'chuck's predictions have been 99
per cent correct in the last half cen-
tury.
W. U. Hensel, secretary and bond-
less treasurer of the 38-year-old
Quarryville Lodge, in' his annual call
to members said "wigwag teams have
developed lightning speed and un-
breakable codes for transmitting top
secret material."
Lemler To Address
Visual Educators
Ford Lemler, director of the Visual
Education Bureau of the University
Extension Service, is in Muncie, In-
diana, attending the Audio-Vusual
Institute for Educators, which was
scheduled yesterday and today at
Ball State Teachers' College.
The "Instructional Materials for
the School Program," and the effec-
tive use of audio-visual aids will be
the topics under discussion at the In-
stitute.
Lemler will speak on "Needed Im-
provements in Materials" at one of
the conference meetings today, and
serve on the staff of consultants
which includes Edgar Dale of Ohio
State University, L.,C. Larson of In-
diana University, Elmer R. Nelson of
Milwaukee Public Museum, and the
members of the Indiana Audio-Vis-
ual Committee.

Holy Communion will be held at 8
and 11 a.m. in ST. ANDREW'S EPIS-
COPAL CHURCH.
The CANTERBURY CLUB will
convene at 6 p.m. in the Student Cen-
ter for a supper meeting. A talk on
"Health and Religion" will be pre-
sented by Dr Inez Wisdom.
ST MARY'S STDENT iAPEL
will hold masses at 8, 10 and 11:30
a.m.
Dr. Edward Redman will give a ser-
mon on "Sixty-four Glorious Years"
at 11 a.m. services in the UNITA-
RIAN CHURCH.
A Work Holiday Session will be
held by the UNITARIAN STUDENT
GROUP at 7:30 p.m. in the Unitarian
Church.
"What's Wrong With the Ship of
State?" is the topic chosen by Dr
Leonard A. Parr for services at 10:45
a.m. in the , CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH.
Members of the CONGREGA-
TIONAL DISCIPLES GUILD will
meet at 5 p.m. to elect a president
and treasurer. An evening of recre-
ation will follow.
The fifth sermon in a series enti-
tled "The Lord's Prayer" will be
presented by Dr. James Brett
Kenna at 10:40 a.m. services in the
METHODIST CHURCH. The topic
of the sermon will be "God and Our
Daily Bread." A student Seminar
will be held at 9:30 a.m. in the Pine
Room of the Church.
Ths WESLEYAN GUILD will meet
at 6 p.m. for supper and discussion.
Dr. Eric Cheo of Chengu, China,
guest speaker, will speak on "Amer-
ica in the Orient." Following the dis-
cussion, the gathering will adjourn to
the Church Sanctuary to hear the
senior choir present a "Choral Even
Song" featuring Russian music.
* * *
"So Little Faith" will be the topic
of Rev. Walter Brandt at 10:30 a.m.
services in TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH.
Rev. E. C. Stellhorn will speak on
"A Firm Faith Foundation" at 10:30
a.m. services in the ZION LUTHER-
AN CHURCH.
Special Instructors
To Leave for Japan
Nine special instructors of the Army
Japanese Language School will leave
the University in three weeks to go
to Japan as employees of the War
Department.
The Japanese-Americans, whose
work will be concerned with civil
censorship, are Miss June Tomita,
Miss Asa Munekiyo, Miss Funiko
Morita, Paul M. Otake, Harold H.
Yanagita, James Nakagawa, Kusuo
Honda, Charles M. Kurashita and
Hiroshi Yamamoto.
Wayne Enrollment Jumps
DETROIT, Feb. 1-(/P)-Some 3,000
veterans are expected to attend
Wayne University during the spring
term, President David D. Henry said
today.
With registration not yet com-
pleted, Henry reported that 2,800
veterans had already registered. He
added that on Jan. 30 alone, 1,600
students registered, a record for the
university for a single day.

W A T C H S C H 00 L-Gen, Omar Bradley, head of the
Veteran's Administration, watches Wiley Heter working on a
watch in a school at Woodside, L. I., built for handicapped vet-
crans interested in the watchmaking trade.

S A 1 L O R S L E A V E G U A M--ischarged U. S. naval personnel board a small shuttle boat
at Guam, first step in a trip by trainsport [ack to the t . S. and civilian life.

T I P S O N W E A VI N G---WAVE Rita Post, pharmacist's
mate third class, gives some hints on weaving to Dorian Dickin-
son, fireman secogd class, at Bethesda, Md., naval hospital
WAVES help patients while away long hours.

J A P A N E S E N U R S E S-Japanese nurses, wearing their bloomer style culottes, wait on the
hospital shjJ a ,;Varti for 533 Niiponese personnel evacuated from Wake.

NIGHT and DFY

YOU DON'T
NEED FLOWERS
Get her some GOLDEN FRIE
CHICKEN. French fried potatoe
buttered toast - 50c, or barbecue
sandwiches with French fried pc
tatoes - 25c. Take it out or eat
here. .1319 S. U.

NO .NEED
TO CHASE AROUND
FOR MEALS
Eat at LEO PING'S and solve your
problem. Good meals, convenient
to campus.

B U D D H A S H R I N E-soldiers of the American Division's
221st Field Artillery gather around a Buddhist priest to question
him after he had offered special prayer for visitors at the foot
of the famous Buddha shrine at Karamura, about 50 miles from
Tokyo. The statue, one of the finest of its kind, is the outstand-
iug shrine in Japan..

L U C K Y K 1 D S-Happy expressions of thanks are shown by these Jap children as they receive
candy from Pfc. RoyVasereno of Chenalis, Wash., and Sgt. Thomas Balint of Cleveland, both of the
11th Airborne Division.

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