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November 01, 1945 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWELVE

THE MICHIGAN lAITTLY

Y, NOVEMBER 11 1946

Y. I~O---------.---

Robeson To pen 67th Cora noneries

:; - 4

' ___L

Distinguished
Baritone Will
Sing Saturday

Singer, Actor Played in
England, Spain, Russia
Opening the University Musical So-
ciety's 67th annual Choral Union Ser-
ies, Paul Robeson, distinguished bari-
tone, will be heard in a concert at
8:30 p. m. Saturday in Hill Auditor-
ium. Popularized as spiritual and bal-
lad singer and actor, and known for
his efforts toward the advancement of
his race, Robeson is again on concert
tour after a successful engagement in
the leading role of "Othello," in
which he played before an Ann Ar-
bor audience in October, 1944.
Elected to Phi Beta Kappa
Son of a Methodist minister, Robe-
son was born in 1898 in Princeton,
N. J. Attending Rutgers University
on a scholarship, he was elected to
Phi Beta Kappa in his junior year
and was graduated with honors. A
four-letter man, excelling in foot-
ball, baseball, basketball and track
during his college days, Robeson was
all-American football end in 1918.
Distinguished in the theater as
well as on the concert stage, Robeson
made his professional debut as an
actor in Eugene O'Neill's "The Em-
peror Jones." The singer's entrance
into the theatrical world was some-
what accidental. Receiving his law
degree at Columbia, he began his
legal practice with a New York firm;
Robeson withdrew, however, because
of racial discrimination. An almost
endless number of stage successes,
including "All God's Chillun Got
Wings," "Black Boy," "Porgy," "Ste-.
vedore" (London) and "Show Boat,"
followed.
Toured Europe, Russia
After an absence of eight years
during which he had toured Europe
and Russia and had sung "Water
Boy," "O1 Man River" and "The Road
to Mandalay" to Loyalist forces in
Spain, Robeson returned to Broad-
way in 1940 in "John Henry." The
Robesons had lived in Russia where
their son attended school for a time.
In November, 1939, the well-known
singer introduced "Ballad for Ameri-
cans."
Noted for his resonant voice, Robe-
son has become the most famous male
singer of Negro spirituals of his day.
Preferring English, Hebrew, Mexican,
Russian and German folk songs to
classical music, the versatile baritone
knows the Chinese, Russian, Spanish
and Gaelic languages.
No season or single tickets are
available for the concert.

PAUL ROBESON /
... to appear Saturday
In the News Again . . .
The University was accorded
nation-wide publicity recently
when the New Yorker magazine
published the following item in its
"Talk of the Town":
"The Summer Term Student
Directory at the University of
Michigan lists Ralph M. Remorse,
of Disconsolate, Arkansas."
Lights Go on Again
At Burton Tower
In case you haven't noticed, the
lights are shining again on Burton
Tower.
As soon as V-J day was officially
announced in August, the University
again switched on the lights which
shine on the tower from four sides.
The tower had been dark since the
beginning of the war and not many
students had seen it illuminated.

Union Drive for'
New Members
Gets Underway
Male Studenits Urged
To Collect Free Cards
Student Offices in the Union will
be open between 1 and 5 p. m. each
weekday this week and next to sign
up male students for membership in
the Union, the club for Michigan men.
Membership in the Union comes
at no cost to the student, and to hold
a membership card entitles the pos-
sessor to facilities corresponding to
those in any men's club. The Union
serves as a social center for many
after-dark functions, and is the meet-
ing place for varied campus organiza-
tions.
Each Friday and Saturday evening,
the Union's second-floor ballroom,
popularly termed the Rainbow Room,
is opened for dancing to the music of
Bill Layton and his orchestra. Dance
tickets are sold only to those holding
membership cards with the Union.
The card entitles students to the
use of the swimming pool, the bil-
liard room and other recreational
facilities. Checks, personal or other-
wise, may be cashed at the main desk
with no other identification necessary
than the Union membership card.
Visiting relatives of Union mem-
bers may find hotel accommodations
in the rooms of the Union. After four
years of undergraduate membership,
students automatically become life
members of the Union. Life members
are shown first preference in securing
rooms at the Union whenever they
return to Ann Arbor for brief visits.
Cost of membership in the Union is
set at $10 per year, which fee is paid
by every student as part of his tui-
tion for the year. Cards and distinct-
ive membership lapel buttons are giv-
en free when the prospective member
registers in the Student offices.

Restaurant Takes
To 'Self-Service'
-After a Fashion
Want to work for your supper, bud?
Several fellows who entered a local
restaurant last week to enjoy a dinner
found themselves with waiter aprons
on-serving a meal to their compan-
ions.
The full-time waiter was swamped
with townspeople and students who
still had to eat "out."
He began asking male customers if
they by chance would work for their
supper. Result: three additional wait-
ers.

ing a'four point average for their final
term in the, College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts.
Undergraduate students Janet L.
Cork, Robert W. Dumm, Edward A.
Farnsworth, Irving J. Ralph, Rich-
ard J. Roeder, David L. Wagner, Ar-
thur B. Gronik and William J. Mul-
lendore, also of the Literary college,
turned in perfect "A".records for the
summer semester. The last two are
both members ,of The Daily staff.
Wagner is. part of the campus Naval
personnel.
In the College of Architecture and
Design, Charles W. Pearson had an
all "A" report card for the summer.
All of the students' with perfect rec-
ords carried at least 12 or more hours
of work during the term.

ONE DOZEN GENIUSES:
Registrar Announces All "A"
Record for Summer Students
A dozen students in the University of Michigan achieved all "A"
records for scholastic work during the summer term, it has been announced
by the registrar's office.
Robert J. Pierce, Fausto A. Ramirez and Joan P. Walker, all of them
'------~graduating seniors, succeeded in mak-

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