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January 27, 1946 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 194

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Natators Beat PurueSmashing

A.aau aaav V XJAI

Quintet Scores Surprise 62-46
Victory over Ohio State Five

Spol *s
NEWS + VIEWS + COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Sports Editor

Mullaney Leads
With 13 Markers
(Continued from Page 1)

in the mididle of the first half as
Harrison, Strack and John Mullan-
ey all shot brilliant baskets from the
floor: Harrison's pivot to bring the
score to 19-9 brought the frenzied
capacity crowd to its feet.
Michigan Leads at Half
Ohio seemed to come to life after
I Wow!

MICHIGAN
Harrison, f .
Strack, f....
Baker, f....
Selbo, c.....

G

Dietrich, c.
P. Elliott, g .. .
Mullaney, g...
Kell, g......
Feinberg, g.. .

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46

this shot and Underman, Warren
Amling, and Huston made good on
three consecutive tosses. Near the
half's close, Underman clicked on two
pivots. Bob Bowen and Ray Snyder
chipped in with a pair of field goals
to carry Ohio to within two points of
the Wolverines at 23-21; and with
two minutes left in the half, the
Buckeyes were beginning to look like
the champions their advance notices
had claimed them to be.
But baskets by Selbo and Mul-
laney cooled the Ohio threat. At the
half, the score read Michigan 27,
Ohio State 21.
Lead Piled Up After Half
The second half was a repetition
of the first, with the only difference
lying in the Wolverines' more aggres-
sive play and their more effective
shooting.
By midway in the second half,
Michigan had gained a53-32 lead.
It only remained for the clock to
run out before one of the greatest
hoop upsets in the country had been
regi stered. The final score read
ich gan 62,. Ohio State 46.
Mullaney Stars
High scorer for th night was John
Mullaney with 18 points. Mullaney
made good on six out of seven free
throws. Michigan made 25 baskets
in 97 attempts, or better than 25 per
cent of is shots. On the other hand,
Ohio made only 18 out of 98 tries.
There lay the difference between the
two teams.
The victory evens the season's Big
Ten record for the Wolverines at four
wins and four losses. For the Buck-
eyes, it was their second Conference
loss as against five victories. The win
also evens the all-time record between
the two schools at 23 wins apiece.

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TOTALS ......25
OHIO STATE G
Snyder, f .......6
Wells, f ........ 0

Bowen, f .......
Underman, c.. .
C. Elliott, c....
Huston, g......
Amling, g.......

THE READER may well wonder at the sanity of the columnist who takes
football for his subject in the middle of January, but we are going to
risk our reputation for soundness of mind to comment on the Michigan
grid schedule issued Wednesday by Athletic Director "Fritz" Crisler.
Last season's ten-game card was, by common consent, the. toughest,
most demanding slate presented to any football team anywhere in the
nation. There was not a "breather" among the ten opponents. Starting
with Army and Navy, and going on down the line, the list of foes was
enough to make any coach turn white.
On the face of things, the 1946 docket is not quite so bad in that respect.
Still and all, it is probably as formidable an autumn program as any
major grid institution has drawn up for itself. The Michigan staff cannot
be accused of scheduling soft touches.
One thing in Michigan's favor next fall is the presence of only one
of the two service elevens on the books. We imagine Crisler is just as
happy matters worked out that way. Tackling Army and Navy in the
same year is akin to gridiron suicide these days.
WE IMAGINE he would be happier yet if Navy, not Army, were going
" to appear here next fall. Navy. powerful as it will probably be, will
riot have Glenn Davis and Doc Blanchard in the backfield. As yet, the only
sure defense even theoretically devised against the Cadets' touchdown twins
is a high calibre rifle-fired at close range.
As for the Wolverines' seven Western Conference tilts, only time will tell.
With veteran stars of former years pouring balk onto the campuses, the
door mats of today may easily be the champions of tomorrow. On the
past records, Iowa and Wisconsin, the newcomers to the schedule, should
be easier than Pennsylvania and Purdue, the teams replaced. But don't
count on it.
You can be pretty sure Bernie Bierman will put together a stronger
Minnesota eleven than the dissension-ridden outfit Michigan trounced so
thoroughly last fall. Bierman is too good a coach to let the situation get
out of hand in two successive seasons.
You can also wager a fair amount of certainty that Ohio State will
be improved over 1945. The Bucks also had trouble with intra-squad strife,
but the shakeup in the coaching staff bids fair to relieve the pressure.
INDIANA, last year's Conference champs, figures to be just as strong in
1946, and perhaps a little stronger. Illinois may have Buddy Young back.
Young's presence makes even an otherwise mediocre team a constant threat.
Michigan, of course, will not be standing still. The Wolverines also
stand to reap considerable dividends from Uncle Sam's forces. All-
American Merv Pregulman, Bob Wiese and Paul White will probably be
around. All three were pretty fair country ball players. Others quite
possibly will show up before next September rolls around.
On the other hand, several of the promising freshman members of the
1945 squad won't be back, thanks to the draft and other reasons. At this
time, Michigan prospects are still in the guessing stage.
At any rate, it should be an interesting season, the first peactime season
in five years. As such, it should bring an improved calibre of play. And, even
at this dangerously long range, we will stick our neck out and predict
Michigan will hold its own.
RUFE CRAVES CITY LIFE
Tigers Sign Gentry,'45 Holdout

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DETROIT, Jan. 26 --(i) -- Rufus
Gentry, lanky Detroit Tiger right-
hander whose season-long holdout in
1945 cost him a World Series cham-
pionship split, has had enough of the
peace and quiet of Daisy Station,
N. C.
Gentry, who pitched a dozen vic-
tories for Detroit's American League
runner-up in 1944, plunked himself
down on his Carolina farm last spring
when an "unsatisfactory" contract
arrived, and refused to budge. The
Tigers wouldn't either and when at
midseason Gentry relented and of-
fered his services General Manager
Jack Zeller wired back: "Wait until
next season."
Gentry's signed contract arrived at
the desk of Detroit's new general
manager, George M. Trautman this
week along with eight others, bring-
ing the list of Tiger candidates un-
der terms for next season to 16.

Other signed contracts were re-
ceived from Outfielder Barney Mc-
Cosky, service dischargee who batted
no worse than .293 in four seasons
with the Tigers before his enlistment
in 1942; Second Baseman Eddie Mayo,
Catcher Paul Richards and left-
handed Pitcher Frank (Stubby)
Overmire, all Tigers in 1945, and four
rookies, Outfielders Ed Mierkowicz
and Vic Wertz, Catcher John Muel-
ler and Pitcher Hal Manders.
Hoover, Two Others Sold
DETROIT, Jan. 26-(AP)-The De-
troit Tigers today announced the
outright sale of Shortstop Joe Hoover
to San Francisco of the Pacific Coast
League and Infielders Ed Borom and
Carl McNabb to Dallas of the Texas
League. Both deals were straight
cash transactions.

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