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January 25, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG~E T

THE MICHIGAN !jX!T-IV

HOME WAS NEVER LIKE THIS:
Redecorated Hospital Hoses Naval U 11

By BETTYANN LARSEN
There's no place like home--espec-
ially when it's the completely redec-
orated home of the University Naval
Unit in North Hall.
The two-story building on North
University-which was a hospital in
its younger days-contains eight of-
fices for Naval instructors, three for
more senior officers. six classrooms,
a chartroom, two drill rooms, film li-
brary, projection room, anti-subma-
rine war trainer, anti-aircraft gun-
Cinema League
Plans More
Foreign Films
Plans for future programs to be
presented by the Art Cinema League
include possible reinstatement of the
motion picture series of the Museum
of Modern Art and an average show-
ing of three foreign pictures every
two months.
The Art Cinema League is cooper-
ating with the foreign language de-
partments of the University and vari-
ous outside groups in sponsoring and
bringing to the campus old and new
foreign films. Two documentary films
will be shown Sunday in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre; "Night Mail," pro-
duced in London, and "Baboona,"
filmed by Mr. and Mrs. Martin John-
son.
Harold J. MacFarlane of the Col-
lege of Engineering was elected chair-
man of the board at a recent meeting,
during which a constitution was pro-
posed and.read. New members of the
board are Stanley D. Dodge .of the
geography department, Antoine J.
Jobin of the French department and
John D. Allison of\ Ann Arbor High
School. George B. Brigham, Jr., of
the College of Engineering, is again
a member of the board.
Union Cards
Are Now Ready
Cards certifying life membership
in the Union are now available to all
civilian men who have been students
in the University the equivalent of
eight semesters.
Life membership in the Union en-
tails all the privileges of ordinary
membership, plus the fact that the
member is no longer assessed for an-
nual dues. In addition, life members
are given preference when engaging
the hotel facilities of the Union.
The cards may be picked up be-
tween 8 a.m. and noon and between
1:30 and 5:30 p.m. in the Business
Office, Rm. 1, University Hall.

neiry'i 'rain Xr, a: wrd ioom eigine rocm
and tcoffee roem.
In fact, a navigational training de-
vice is soon to be set up in the former
operating room.
And, there's a coke machine in
the basement.
The Penny Arcade was never like
this: A sound track, which roars like
the attacking Jap bomber flashed on
a movie screen, and rattles like an an-
ti-aircraft gun, adds to the realism of
the gunnery trainers which are used
to train men in firing automatic wea-
pons during torpedo and dive-bomb-
ing attacks. A 20-millimeter and a
40-millimeter gun are used in the
training while a moving ring sight,
instead of tracer bullets, directs the
gunner's aim and shows his hits on
the screen.
We repeat: the Penny Arcade has
nothing on this.
A film library which contains sev-
eral of the anti-aircraft training reels
and 260 other films covering all
phases of Naval science instruction, a
modern training-aid device used to
project navigation problems on a
screen, keys for code practice, sem-
aphore flags and signal searchlights
are also used in classroom instruction.
The two chartrooms with regula-
tion tables and large charts of
many United States and foreign
harbors are part of the training
program, and a complete group of
instruments-sextants, stadimeters
Jet Propulsion
Is Discussed
At Symposium
Experimental work on the use of
new ideas and materials for gas tur-
bines, jet propulsion and ram jets
(buzz bombs) being done by the Cali-
fornia Institute of Technology was
reported on by Dr. Duwez at the
Wright Field symposium this week,
Prof. E. T. Vincent of the department
of mechanical engineering said yes-
terday.
The symposium was attended by
representatives from a number of
universities and industries. The Uni-
versity of Michigan was represented
by Prof. Vincent and Prof. F. L.
Schwartz of the department of me-
chanical engineering and Prof. A. M.
Kuethe of the department of aero-
nautical engineering.
They propose to hold one of these
meetings a month, Prof. Vincent said.
Since the experimental work is being
financed by the government, he com-
mented, it belongs to the public. That
is why representatives of the various
universities and industries are invited
to attend these meetings.

iinid ,.1a1'-fimnders -maki~e posil re
tlistie " hip-ba " c1-d1''it i liOns.
In the basement armory there is a
large room housing the "anatomy" of
a mine, a torpedo cross-section,
depth charges, and loading machines
for 5-inch-38-millimeter, 40-milli-
meter and 5- and 3-inch guns.
A ward room on the second floor
is "where the fellows can relax be-
tween classes," Lieut. Comm. Harry
Fitch said. Adjacent to the room is
a small library of Navy reference
books.
Almost completed is an anti-sub-
marine warfare trainer which will
simulate actual warfare conditions
on a screen.
"We're proud of our new home,"
Comm. Fitch said, "and we're proud
of the modern facilities we are
able to use in instruction."
At this point, Comm. Norman Gil-
lette added, "Don't forget, Harry, that
wee owe sincere thanks to the Univer-
sity and especially to the fine Build-
ing and Grounds Department for
making the change, so that we can
offer an up-to-date training program
to our students."
Professors Will
Attend Meeting
Brigance To Speak
At Speech Luncheon
Seven members of the faculty of
the Department of Speech will at-
tend a luncheon meeting of the Mich-
igan Association of Teachers of
Speech Saturday in Lansing.
Prof. W. Norwood Brigance of Wa-
bash College, who is president of the
National A.T.S., will be the principal
speaker
University members at the meeting
will include speech department
Chairman G. E. Densmore and Prof.
Donald Hargis, who is secretary-
treasurer of the Michigan A.T.S. Oth-
ers who will attend are Professors
Louis Eich, Charles Lomas, Davis
Owen, Harlan Bloomer and Ollie
Backus.
Speakers To A fIend
Waterway Debate'
A delegation from Sigma Rho Tau,
stump speakers society, will go to De-
troit on Saturday to discuss the St.
Lawrence Seaway at a round table
with delegations from other colleges.
Delegates from the University
chapter will be Margaret Carroll, Bob
Pollack, Victor Jamal and Bernard
Chulhof. The faculty representative
will be Prof. Robert D. Brackett, of
the English Department in the Col-
lege of Engineering.
Buy Victory Bonds!.

.

El.

'ONE-MAN ARMY' MAY ENTER POLITICS-Maj. Arthur W. Wermuth
(above), famed "One Man Army of Bataan," works on an outboard
motor at his home in Traverse City, Mich. Wermuth expressed himself
as "going into politics as a Democrat" when his terminal leave expires.
Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Republican, may oppose him if Wermuth
chooses to run as Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan.
PROF. MOEHLMAN SAYS:

Sub-Standard Buildings Will
Limit State Public Instruction

Michigan schools will become in-
creasingly limited in their ability to
meet the needs for universal public
instruction unless the present sub-
standard building needs are remedied,
Prof. Arthur B. Moehlman, of the
School of Education, said in an arti-
cle for the School of Education Bul-
letin.
"Operating budgets for 1946-47
should at least be 35 per cent high-
er than in 1939-40 merely to main-
tain status quo without providing
for growth in membership, smaller
elementary classes, more diversified
curriculums, and more adequate
textual and visual aids."
If teaching is to improve, Prof.
Moehlman stated, it must be realized
that school buildings are an impor-
tant essential of the total school pro-
gram. In presenting the needs for
public education to the legislature
neither school boards, superinten-
dents, professional groups or state
education officials included the school
plant in their estimate of needs.
Heavy legislative emphasis was placed
on operating and retirement needs
without even mentioning the school
plants needs, Prof. Moehlman de-
clared.
Claiming that curricular changes
during the past twenty years have
made the older and inflexibly built
schools inadequate for present day

needs, Prof. Moehlman said that
thousands of these older buildings
present hazards to safety of the stu-
dents.
"Since 1925 there has been an un-
usual drift toward suburban concen-
trations just outside of the larger
cities. These areas have been func-
tioning with 'temporary' school build-
ings for the past twenty years."
Another factor which increases
the buildings needs, Prof. Moehl-
man explained, is the war-time in-
crease in population through mi-
gration from other states. Urban
and state officials can no longer ig-
nore the fact that most of this mi-
gration will be permanent.
The Public Education Study Com-
mission spent more than two years
investigating the total needs for pub-
lic education. It recommended the
progressive reorganization of more
than 6,000 independent school dis-
tricts into 253 reasonably competent
elementary - secondary community
districts as the first step in equaliz-
ing educational opportunity
Another recommendation was for
an annual appropriation by the
legislature of not less than 10 mil-
lion (approximately half of the an-
nual total building needed), based
on the assumption of help from
federal contribution, to a postwar
public works program.

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS
Brazilan To Lecture . . ,."Foundation 'vvith Rabbi Jehudah M,
Cohen officiating.
Paulo Pinto, Brazilian lawyer here Included in the services will be
on a research scholarship, will lec- "sermonettes" dealing with the topic
ture on his native country at 8 p.m. "What I Believe." Victor Baum, Mal-
today in the Rackham Amphitheatre colm Roemer, and Sheldon Selesnick
in the third lecture of the series on will be the speakers.
Latin American countries offered by A social hour will follow the serv-
La Sociedad Hispanica. ices.
Two color pictures, "Brazil" and
"Amazon Awakens," will be shown. IIe HallLuncheon . .
Pinto will be introduced by Dr. Frank
0. Copley, Director of Admissions The Student Religious Association
with Advanced Standing of the Liter- will hold their weekly luncheon at
ary College and member of the Ad- 12:30 p.m. tomorrow in Lane Hall.
vistory Committee of La Sociedad Dr. Paul Tillich's four lectures, fea-
Hispanica. tured at the Seventh Annual Michi-
The public is cordially invited to gan Pastor's Conference, will be dis-
attend, cussed following the luncheon.
SRA Coffee Hour ... Educator To Confer . .
The Student Religious Associa- Dr. J. Leighton Stuart, former
tion will hold its weekly Coffee president of China's Yenching Uni-
Hour at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow in Lane versity, will be in Ann Arbor Feb.
Hall. 5 through Feb. 9 to confer with en-
Groups of honor= will be Hillel gineering and natural science pro-
Foundation, Newman Club, and the fessors and Chinese students.
Interguild. Special hostesses in- A prominent American educator,
elude Priscilla Hodges, Harriet Dr. Stuart was recently released
Jackson, Mary Battle, Betty Kor- from a prisoner-of-war camp in the
ash, Barbara Levin, and Allene Far East.
Golenken. All students are invited
to attend. . St. Mary's Chapel .. .
The Rev. Fr. Hubert Maino, acting
Austrian Musical . . . vice-chancellor of the Archdiocese of
Featuring music by Robert Stolz, Detroit, will be the guest speaker at
famed composer of "Two Hearts in a breakfast following 10 a.m. mass
Waltz Time," the Austrian film, "The Sunday in the Clubrooms of St.
Merry Wives of Vienna," will be pre- Mary's Chapel.
sented at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, in the Sunday will be a general Commu-
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. ity Sunday for University students.
The film is an operetta dealing with Tickets for the breakfast are avail-
the gay Vienna of 1875 when Strauss able from the breakfast committee or
was at the height of his popularity. at the Newman Club.
It was filmed in pre-war Vienna.
Co-sponsors of the movie are the Roger Williams Guild .
Art Cinema League and the Deutsch- The Roger Williams Guild will
er Verein. hoe ilasGidwl
rV n have a Bandage Rolling Party for
the University Hospital at 8:30 p.m.
League House Dance . . . today in the Guild House. There will
The first League House Dance be refreshments and singing.
will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. tomor- Becky Winchester will review
row in the Le2gue ballroom. Wom- Georgia Harkness' "Religious Liv-
en living in zones six, seven, and at7:t tGu IresideForum
eight, and all men on campus are ______________________
invited to attend.
4'MONTH INTENSIVE
Vocational Guidance .. . Course for
Samuel Kellman, vocational COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
guidance counselor of B'nai B'rith A thorough, intensive course-start-
Hillel Foundations, will be in Ann ing February, July, October. Bulletin
Arbor tomorrow and Sunday to A,on request. Registration now open.
give interviews to students.
Anyone interested in seeing Kell- Regular day and evening schools .
man should call the Foundation for throughout the year. Catalog.
an appointment. PREFERRED BY COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN
TH E G REGG COLLEGE
Hillel Holds Services President, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
" " -Director,Paul M. Pair, M. A.
*Sabbath eve services will begin at Dept. CP 6 N. Michigan Ave.
7:45 p.m. today at B'nai B'rith Hillel Chicago 2, Illinois
r

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Wreathe yourself in this
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Dry perfume is the fadeless
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to the
IBIDAPbEST STRING QUARTET
Now in Ann Arbor for three concerts, tonight, Saturday
afternoon and Saturday night.
Here are a few of the many outstanding recordings
by the Budapest Qnartet, the finest Chamber Music organ-
i a/loui of our trine.
BEETHOVEN: Quartets No. 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12,
14, 15, 16
DEBUSSY: Quartet in G Minor
DVORAK: Quartet No. 6 (American)
MOZART: Clarinet Quintet (with Benny Goodman)
Quintet in C Major (with Katims, Viola)
Quintet in G Minor (with Katims, Viola)
Quartet No. 17 in B Flat Major (Hunt)
RAVEL: Quartet in F
SCHUBERT: Quintet in C Major (with Heifetz,
Cello)
Quartet No. 13 in A Minor
Enjoy this ivorld-famous Quartet this week-end at the
Rackham Building and at home on records.
'A .f

i

I I Im I

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