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January 18, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v.-

rAGE SIX

'"H --MICaHI CAI DAIL

DAY, JANUARY- 18, 1946

_____________________________________________----__------_

------------- Im,

DOCTORS BRUSH UP:
Medical School Offers Review
Courses for Returning Vets

"Clinical Applications of the Basic
Sciences," first of three intensive
post-graduate refresher courses,
planned by the medical school for re-
turning medical officers and civilian
physicians, is now being conducted
at University Hospital under the di-
rection of the Department of Post-
graduate Medicine.
Physicians from 16 states and from
Audubon Group
Plans Meeting
Prof. Hann Will Headt
Annual Session of Club
The Michigan Audubon Society will
hold its 42nd annual meeting today
and tomorrow in the Assembly Hall
at Rackham Building with Dr. Harry
W. Hann of the zoology department
presiding.
The two-day session will be opened
with an exhibit of photographs pre-
sented by members of the society at
7:30 p.m., and will be followed by a
program session. A speech entitled
"University of Michigan Biological
Station in Kodachrome" will be pre-
sented by Charles H. Blair and two
ornithology lectures are scheduled.
A social hour will follow the meeting.
Annual reports of the society, a
visit to the University Museum, and
an afternoon business and program
session are ' planned for Saturday's
meeting. The annual dinner will bel
held at 6 p.m. in the Congregational
Church and will be followed by a
final program session at which movies
will be shown.
Members of the local committee
include Dr. Hann, chairman, Joseph
J. Hickey, Nadine Literaty, Mrs. Mar-
garet Branch, Mrs. Maxine Miles and
Jean Moore.
Data Compiled
By Observatory
Through data compiled from ob-
servations of the sun, the University's
McMath-Hulbert Observatory is aid-
ing the government to make semi-
weekly forecasts of short wave radio
reception conditions to the armed
forces.
Dr. Robert R. McMath, director of
the Observatory which is at Lake An-
gelus, near Pontiac, said that the Ob-
servatory has been assisting the gov-
ernment in such forecasts since, early
in 1942.
Solar observations are directed by
Prof. Orren C. Mohler.
Chapel Was Compulsory
In the 1860's chapel attendance
twice a day was compulsory at the
University. The services were held
from 5:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. and from
4:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Candles were

Colombia have enrolled in the course,
which will run for two months and
will be followed by courses in "In-
ternal Medicine" and "Courses forj
Practicioners." Various aspects of
the fundamental sciences which have
immediate bearing upon the practice
of medicine are emphasized in the
lectures, which are given from 9 a.m.
to noon each day by the preclinical
faculty.
Afternoon sessions, lasting from
1:30 to 5:00 p.m., consist of ward
rounds and clinical laboratory diag-
noses, followed by pathology semi-
nars, medical X-ray conferences, or
t clinical conferences. Staff members
from the clinical department as well
as the entire medical staff conduct
these classes and participate in the
seminars and conferences.
Five hours each week are devoted
to demonstrations and exercises in
laboratory methods of diagnosis, with
particular attention to hematology.
Lecture periods are devoted to bio-
chemistry, physiology, pharmacology,
psychiatory, neurology, bacteriology
and immunology. Those enrolled in
the courses are expected to avail
themselves of the facilities of the
University's extensive medical li-
brary, a few library periods being pro-
vided for a limited time Friday af-
ternoons.
IRA Committee Will Meet
The Educational Committee of
The Inter-Racial Association will
meet at 4 p.m. today in the Union,
Bill Holloway, chairman announced.
All members and interested persons
are asked to attend.

Poetry Club
To Substitute
For 'U' Course
Organized as a substitute for a
modern poetry course, a new Modern
Poetry Club has been formed under
the chairmanship of Marcie Dubin-
sky, '46, with Prof. Arno L. Bader
of the English department as advisor.
The club was begun upon the sug-
gestion of Prof. Morris Greenhut of
the English department after many
students complained of the lack of a
course in modern poetry.. Member-
ship in the club, which meets once
a week, has now reached a total of
thirty.
Among the purposes of the club
are for its members to write and dis-
cuss poetry, and to arrange for guest
speakers who will address the group
on contemporary poets. The club
usually asks a few professors in the
English department to attend its
meetings and offer guidance. The
club also hopes to bring modern poets
to Ann Arbor.
In addition to Miss Dubinsky, who
is chairman of the group, the club
has a program planning committee
composed of four members.
German Paper Uses
Professor's Pieture
The Michigan War Historical Col-
lection has received a copy of the
"Darmstadter Echo" containing a pic-
ture of Prof. James K. Pollock, who is
on leave .of absence from the political
science department, conferring with
representatives of the three sections
of the American zone of occupation
in Germany.
Prof. Pollock is serving in Germany
as a political adviser to the American
military government. He left for Ger-
many in July, 1945.

ASSOCIATED PRESS
PDCTURE NEWS

V E T E R A N-Although he's
just 14 years old, Darryl Hick-
man is celebrating his tenth an.
niversary in the movies.

M A R C H O F D I M E S B 0 0 K - President Truman (center) receives from Nicholas
Schenck (left), national chairman of the March of Dimes for the movie indutry, and Basil O'Connor
(right), president of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, a book containing signatures of
state chairmen in the March of Dimes drive. Other workers look on.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)

will be a class at 8:30 p.m. led by Mr.
Van Pernis on "The Prophets and
Their Message." Entertainment,
games and refreshments will follow.
If you attend the concert, drop in for
the remainder of the evening.
Corning Events
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet at its Center, 1304 Hill
Street, on Saturday evening at 7:30,
to go on a Sleigh Ride Party. Those
who cannot attend the sleigh ride are
cordially invited to come to the Cen-
ter any time during the evening.
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet for its regular Sunday eve-
ning meeting in Zion-Lutheran Par-
ish Hall, 309 E. Washington St., at
5:00. The Rev. Karl Mix, Inter-Mis-
sion Pastor at Toledo, Ohio, will
speak on "The Lutheran Church at
Work at Home." Supper and fellow-

Tryouts for the French Play will
be held on Monday, Tuesday and
Thursday of next week from 3 to 5
in Room 408 of the Romance Lan-
guage Building. Any student with
some knowledge of the French Lan-
guage may try out.
Veterans' Wives: A meeting of the
V 0's Wives Club will be held Mon-
day night. at 7:30 in the Michigan
League. All wives of Veterans on the
campus are invited to attend.
Phi Lambda Upsilon: A short busi-
ness meeting for the purpose of elect-
ing new officers will precede a talk
by Professor D. L. Katz of the Chem-
ical Engineering Department on The
Academic Versus The Industrial Ca-
reer For Chemists And Chemical
Engineers. 7:30 p.m., Monday, Janu-
ary 21, in the East Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg. An open discussion
will follow on this vital topic. Re-
freshments will be served.

RAILC H I EF AT TH ROT TL EGeorge F.Ashby.
left- sits at the throttle of a Union Pacific Railroad locoinotive at
Omaha after he was named president of the road. Vice-presidents
Perry J.. Lynch (center) and Frank W. Robinson look on.'

W I L B U R I S S I C K--Judith Payne, Los Angeles, looks
sadly at her puppy, Wilbur, who has a cold and won't play. She
adopted Wilbur (and changed his name to Gladys) when the
pup's photo was published as an unwanted waif. /

carried and provided by the students.ship hour will follow at 6:00.

'I

a [
BUNNY FUR ~MITTENS
with gay colored leather palms
$1.98
KH
/ *11
ADDf SPICE to your ward- ; s

THE WOOLY ACCESSORIES in your ife
right now should be warm and practical
yet gay as a Swiss yodel. We have them all.
Sale priced, too!
- f.
~r
* SWEATERS 2.49 - 2.98 - 3.98
* SKIRTS - 2.98 - 3.98 - 5.00
ISLACKS - 3.98 - 5.00 - 7.00
OFUR MITTENS - 1.98 - 2.98
Bunny fur and Electrified
Lamb - Beaver
O ANKLETS - 29c - 1.39
\ SCARFS - 98c

G R E E T I N G S-Rita Corday
of the films prepares to address
a valentine to a GI overseas,

I A P S D E BA R K A T H 0 M E C A N D-Jap servicemen scramble over the side of a barge
as it docks at Uraga, Japan, after a voyage home fnrm Borneo, Palau and the Philippines where they
saw action. Masks are worn to help prevent disease spread.

I

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