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January 06, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUA RY 6, 1946

MOMENTOUS YEAR FOR INDIA:
Changes in Political Structure Foreseen

By PRESTON GROVER
BOMBAY, Jan. 5-(A)-For India,
1946 promises to be the most mo-
mentous year in history.
There are several possibilities for
changes in the country's political
structure, and the full development
of any one would be a major histori-
cal event.
Conceivably India might obtain
full independence in the next 12
months, or she might choose a slower
course and progress toward self-gov-
ernment through a constitutional
convention in complete and friendly
cooperation with Britain. She might
divide into two Indias-one governed
by Hindus and one by Moslems.
Might Be Revolution
And, if conflicts arose which frus-
trated the hopes and plans of In-
dia's political leaders, there might be
a revolution.
The end of World War II automa-
tically eliminated all reasons for re-
straining political developments long
held in check. Congress leaders,
jailed in 1942, were released, and agi-
tation for quick action to bring inde-
pendence to India boiled up to a pitch
not recalled by observers of this gen-
eration.
Viceroy Archibald Percival Wavell
made a final futile attempt to bring
the Moslem League and the All-India
Congress into agreement on the unity
of the country, or even on collabora-
tion in the central government.
Elections for the Central Assembly
showed that India's major parties
had split on religious lines to a
greater degree than had been antici-
pated.
"Rich Man's Election"
In the Central Assembly elections,
fewer than 500,000 of the country's
400,000,000 residents voted. It was
known generally as the "rich man's
election" because only wealthy prop-
erty owners and a small number of
others qualified under the limited
franchise.
According to a tabulation by the

Times of India, the Moslem League
headed by Mahomed Ali Jinnah
polled 86 per cent of the Moslem vote
in Moslem areas, while in predomi-
nantly Hindu areas, the All-India
Congress Party candidates drew
nearly 89 per cent of the votes.
As a result of the elections, the
Jinnah followers argued that the
Moslem League was the sole organi-
zation with authority to speak for
Moslems, while Congress leaders con-
tended the League was composed
mainly of rich landlords and wealthy
merchants.
The Congress Party contended fur-
ther that the provincial elections,
which begin this month and end in
April, will show that a wider elector-
ate, including many poor Moslems
will look to the Congress for leader-
ship.
Congress Party Leader Sardar Val-
laohai Patel predicts that "freedom is
coming."
"Perhaps we will get it next year,"
he said in December. "It is only nec-
essary to give one last determined
push to Britain. That push will not
be of any small section of people, but
of 400,000,000 people of India united
in a single resolve."

Englishmen with long experience
in India say, on the other hand, that
the Moslem League-Congress tug-of-
war will go on for years and that it
might be 10 to 25 years before any-
thing approaching self-government
could be expected.
Uprisings Predicted
Some observers predict that by
March there will be bloody uprisings
and that the full force of the British
Army still in uniform in India will
be required to suppress it, if sup-
pression is possible.
One usually good barometer of sen-
timent is the stock market. There
are no signs that British investors
in India are selling out at abnormal
rates in anticipation that the Indian
national government will render their
holdings worthless. For a long time
there has been a drift in that direc-
tion, with Indian capitalists purchas-
ing whatever British investors choose
to release, but the transfer rate dis-
closes no sudden panic.
Some American and British busi-
ness houses, especially those dealing
in automobiles and chemicals, seem
eager to increase their holdings in
India, indicating their belief in a
peaceful .future.

Dental School
Faculty Wins
Navy Award
The Navy Bureau of Medicine and
Surgery has awarded Dean Russell
W. Bunting and the faculty of the
school of Dentistrya certificatetof
commendation, recognizing their
services to the nation in the V-12
training program.
Surgeon General of the Navy, Ross
T. McIntire, who issued the certificate
has also sent Dean Bunting a letter
of appreciation for his services.
During the war, 39 V-12 students
were graduated from the School of
Dentistry in three classes. Twenty-
eight are enrolled at the school now.
The V-12 students follow the regular
dentistry accelerated program.
The text of the certificate of com-
mendation follows:
"The Surgeon General, on behalf
of the Medical Department of the
Navy, commends you for your splen-
did cooperation and outstanding con-
tribution to the education of Navy
V-12 dental students for appointment
in the Dental Corps of the Navy. You
have rendered a distinguished ser-
vice to your country during the period
of World War 2."
New Redeployment
System Will Begin
FRANKFURT, Germany, Jan. 5-
(I)-Gen. Joseph T. McNarney dis-
closed today a new system of U. S.
Army redeployment from Europe un-
der which the release of men to go
home will depend on whether they
are essential in their jobs, and
whether replacements arrive.

Senior President Stresses Need
For Dues To Aid Organization

REUNIONS PLANNED:

ARTHUR BRANDON
randon Named
Arthur Brandon, President of the
American College Publicity Associ-
ation, has been appointed University
of Michigan Public Relations Direc-
tor.
Formerly with. Vanderbilt Univer-
sity and the University of Texas in
a capacity similar to that which he
holds here. Mr. Brandon has written
many professional articles on the
subject of public relations.
His office is now in the University
News Service on the second floor ,of
University Hall, but soon will be
moved to the first floor or basement
of Angell Hall.

The announcement that senior
class dues are being collected has
prompted questions concerning the
purpose and use of the dues.
It is customary for a graduating
class, stated Patricia Barrett, senior
class president, to establish a strong
class organization before leaving the
University in order to maintain its
identity in Michigan's vast alumni
body. By providing this organiza-
ticn with funds, the class can better
sustain the contacts and friendships
made on campus through class let-
ters and reunions.
The Class of 1946, Miss Barrett
said, will hold its first reunion in
1951 and again every five years.
Dues are now being collected from
all seniors in the literary college from
9 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m.
Youth Group Plais Hike
The Youth Hostel will sponsor a
hike beginning at 3 p.m. today under
the leadership of Barbara Sprague.
Hikers will meet at Lane Hall. After
the hike, supper will be served at
Robert Owen House.

Monday and Tuesday outside Rm. 2
University Hall.
At the same booth, general an-
n01uncements for February graduates
in all schools may be ordered. All an-
nouncements must be ordered by 3
p.m. Tuesday, and must be paid for
in full when ordered. Engineers are
requested to order their announce-
ments from 10-12 a.m. and at 1 p.m.
on the second floor of the West En-
gineering Building.
Spanish Club
To Give Movie
The exploits of a miller, a mayor
and their wives is the subject of "The
Three-Cornered Hat", the Spansh
movie to be presented by La Sociedad
Hispanica at 8 p.m. Wednesday in
the Lydia Mendelsshon Theatre.
The mayor, in love with the beau-
tiful wife of the miller, has him ar-
rested without cause. The miller's
escape from jail sets off a series of
domestic crises in the homes of both
parties.
Members of La Sociedad Hispanica
will be admitted by paying only the
federal tax.

T' Professors
Will Speak On
Atomic Energy
Five University scientists will de-
liver addresses at a "Symposium on
the Release of Atomic Energy" spon-
sored by Sigma Xi, to be held at 8
p.m. Thursday in the Rackham Au-
ditorium.
Dr. Ernest F. Barker, chairman of
the physics department will discuss
"The History of Atomic Disintegra-
tion up to 1932," with Prof. Kasimir
Fajans of the chemistry department
addressing the group on "Intra-mole-
cular and Intra-atomic Forces; Eh-
ergy Relations Within Atoms."
Prof. H. R. Crane, well-known for
his work in the development of the
V-T Fuse, will talk on "Summary,
1933 to 1943, of Disintegrations,
Transmutations, and Machines for
Smashing Atoms.".
"Atomic Fission, Uranian 235, and
the Atomic Bomb," will be the sub-
ject of Prof. James M. Cork of the
physics department, with Prof. E. T.
Vincent of the School of Engineering
analyzing, "Problems and Failures
(mostly failures) in Attempts to Use
Sudden Explosives (dynamite, nitro-
glycerine, TNT and now Atomic Fis-
sion) in Commercial Heat Engines.
The public is invited.
Talamon to Deliver
Readings in French
Prof. Rene Talamon will deliver
readings from masteprpieces of
French prose and poetry at the first
in the series of lecures presented by
Le Cercle Francais, at 4:10 p.m. Wed-
nesday in Rm. D, Alumni Memorial
Hall.
Excerpts from Moliere, La Fon-
taine, Victor Hugo, Musset and Ros-
tand will be included in the pro-
gram, whose purpose, Prof. Talamon
explained, is to enable students to
hear as much French as possible out-
side of the classroom.
Buy Victory Bonds!

University Radio Programs_
The University of Michigan Broadcasting Service will broadcast the
following programs for the week of Jan. 7 to Jan. 13.
MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. U of M Students Quiz Their Professors of Education
"Newer Methods of Citizenship Education"
O. W. Stephenson
2:45 p.m. COMMUNITY IN ACTION
"Introducing the Community In Action Series"
Mrs. Matilda Rubin, member of the Staff,
Adult Education.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. CAMPUS NEWS
Beth Laikin from Detroit, Michigan
Arthur Markey from Pittsburgh, Penna.
Mary Patterson from Bay City
Keith McKenney, Burlington, Vt.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
"The Last Duchess" by Claire Meisels
Enacted by students enrolled in broadcasting classes.
Directed by Prof. David Owen.
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30' p.m. THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC PROGRAM
Complete program under the direction of Prof. Hanns
Pick
.2:45 p.m. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
"How the Veteran Can Procure Surplus Property"
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"X-rays in Children's Diseases"
Dr. John Holt
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE UNIVERSITY CARILLON
Played by Sidney Giles
Station WJR
11:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"The Common Causes of Diarrhea"
Dr. H. M. Pollard.
FRIDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Enacted by students enrolled in broadcasting classes
Directed by Prof. David Owen.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. Dorothy Ornest, Soprano'
SATURDAYP:
Station WJR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. STUMP THE PROFESSOR
Clements Library of American History; Arthur Hackett,
Basic Panel: Dr. Randolph Adams, Director of the
Professor of Voice in the School of Music; Dr. George
Kiss of the Geography Department, and Curator of
Maps for the Clements Library; Dr. Amos Morris,
Assistant Professor of English; Dr. Frank Robbins,
Assistnat to the President.
Waldo Abbot, Director of Broadcasting and Associate
Professor of Speech, acts as quizmaster.
SUNDAY:
Station WJR
9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. HYMNS OF FREEDOM
Commentary prepared and presented by Dr. Donald
E. Hargis. Quartet directed by Arthur Hackett.

CLASSIFIED DVE RTISING

SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 1946
8:00 News
8:05.Organ Music
8:15 Jimmy Wakely
8:30 Frankie Masters
9:00 News
9:05 Ralph Ginsburg
9:30 Ave Maria Hour
10:00 News
10:15 Michigan Highway
Department
10:30 Chalie Barnett
10:45 Veteran's Counseling
Service

11:00 News
11:05 Calvary
Church

Evangelical

12:00 News
12:05 Do You Remember?
12:15 Mario Morelli
12:30 Concert Hall of the
Air
12:45 Bible Hour
1:00 News
1:15 Boy Scouts of
America
1:30 Moments of Devotion

1:40 Jerry Sears
1:45 Capt. Roland Mc-
Laughlin (voc.)
2:00 News
2:05 Les Brown
2:15 Charlie Spivak
2:30 Vladimir Selinsky
3:00 News
3:05 Bob Crosby
3:30 Dell Leonard
4:00 News
4:05 Milt Herth
4:15 Song Spinners
4:30 Boston Blackie

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Brown billfold with initials
V.F.B. Contains valuable cards and
papers. Call Virginia Borders, 9300
after 5:30 p.m. Reward.
LOST: Gruen watch, black band on
Dec. 31 near State theater. Helen
Adelman, 4546. Reward.
LOST: Will the person who switched
black fur carriage boots, size 5, at
Waterman gym New Years Eve call
2-5685, Ext. 43 or 8373.
LOST: Green wallet in League wom-
ens lounge. Wednesday. Contents
valuable to owner. Keep money as
reward. Turn in at League desk
or call 7672.
LOST: Between Jan. 1 and 3, brown
billfold containing calling cards,
papers, and checks. Finder please
communicate with Dr. Alma Cooke,
University Health Service, 2-4531.
Reward.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Young man to help in
dining room. Call Sunday 26112
WANTED: Part time fountain help.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co. 324
South State.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Army officer's genuine
beaver overcoat, size 39-40. Prac-
tically new. Call 2-1994 after 6:00
p.m.
WANTED
WANTED: Koday 35 or equivalent.
New or second hand. Will pay your
price. Call M. Austin 2-3225 after
7:3$ p.m.
WANTED: ," 3/4" pipe, 1" tubing or
angles new or used, Vi. 1-0313, 1515
Springwells, Detroit.
WANTED: Sewing. Will make two
worn sheets into one good one. Also
do refitting of formals or date
dresses and any refitting except on
black material. Miss Livingston,
315 S. Division, 2nd floor front.
MISCELLANEOUS
A SOCIAL necessity! Contract bridge
lessons. Reasonable rates. Call the
Kulbertson Kids. 9765, evenings.

THE MEDICAL BOOK CENTER
The newest in Medical, Dental, Public
Health, and Law Books. Large stock
and Special Order Service.
OVECLK Bookstore
Phone 4436 1216 South University Ave.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

9

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im

Violinist Elizabeth
To Play in Faculty

Green
Recital

Elizabeth A. H. Green, violinist, as-
sisted by, Joltn Kollen, pianist, will
present the first faculty recital of the
semester at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Janu-
ary 6. in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Miss Green's program will include
Sonata for violin by Geminiani, Con-
certo No. 4 in D major by Mozart
and Sonata in B minor for piano and
violin by Respighi.
Both performers are members of
the School of Music faculty. The pro-
gram will be opento the public with-
out charge.

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MICHIGAN

SUNDAY DINNER
HALF GRAPEFRUIT FRU1T COCK'T'AIL
CIIICKEN SUPREME SOUP
VARIETY OF CELERY, OLiVES, AND PIt.I .s
BROILED LAKE HURON TROUT with tartar sauce $1.50
GRILLED TENDERLOIN STEAK
with french fried onions. . ............. 2.25
GRILLED PORTERHOUSE STEAK
with french fried onions . . . . . . . 2.00
GRILLED SIRLOIN STEAK with french fried onions 1.85
BROILED LAMB CHOPS............ . . ....... 1.50
BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with candied yass . .. ... 15
ROAST YOUNG CHICKEN with sage dressing
and giblet gravy.............. 150
SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN . . ........1... ..50
Head Lettuce Salad with Thousand s.an/d IDressing
tresh Frozen Vegetables: Corn, Green Peas, Lima Beans
French fried potatoes, mashed, candied yams
Homemade Apple Pie Lemon Mering e Pie
Ice Cream Cake

I

WHEN STRANGERS MEET-AND LOVE
-THINGS ARE BOUND TO HAPPEN!
-ROGERS
P ID GE
'"AVA N 4 Iv
N M-G-M's
AT THE
<. ® n E11~

Don Duryeo, 0o
"Woman In The
Window" fame,
as Monte Jarrad
the killer,

a with
WILLIAM DEMAREST * DAN DURYEA
FRANK SULLY

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