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December 16, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVA',N

:9

Michigan Cade Squad sets aaks

w

Hoopsters Undefeated
With Winover Sailors
Selbo, Harrison Pace Wolverine Attack
During Second Half Comeback Barrage

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4r' R:.t Is Ed_ eEYBOARD
By MARY LU HEATH
Associate Sports Editor

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By The Associated Press
GREAT LAKES, Dec. 15-Glenn
Selbo and Bob Harrison paced a sec-
ond half drive as Michigan's basket-
ball forces scored their fourth straight
victory by upsetting the Great Lakes
Naval Training Station team 58 to.
45 last night.
The two clubs battled on even
terms for the first half, with Michi-
gan on the long end of a 26-22 count
as the half ended.
With Harrison and Selbo pacing
the attack, Michigan ran up a 38-27
lead shortly after the second half
Cagers attle
With Utah Five
After a one-day rest following their
game with the Great Lakes Naval
Training Station quintet last night,
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's Michi-
gan cagers will take on the University
of Utah basketball squad at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Yost Field House.
This clash will be the Wolverines'
fifth of the 1945-46 season, and their
third at home. It will be the first
match the current Maize and Blue
team has had against a Far-Western
aggregation.
Reports on the Utah five are var-
ied. It dropped a heart-breaker by
cne point to St. John's University
last week in New York's Madison
Square Garden. On the basis of
comparative performances this gives
Michigan the edge, since Western
Michigan, which the Wolverines
trounced by a 20-point margin, beat
St. John's.

got underway and Great Lakes never
Utood a chance from then on in.
Selbo had 16 points and Harrison
15 to lead the Wolverines while Weiss
scored 11 for the losers. It was the
Sailors' second defeat in two nights
and their fourth in five games.
The score was 22 to 20 just before
the half when Pete Elliot dropped in
two long ones to give Michigan a 26
to 22 lead.

Summariesr

-11

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MICHIGAN (58)
fg
Selbo, f .........5
Feinberg, f .... 0
Harrison, c .....6
Mullaney, g......1
Strack, g........ 0
.e , g .. . J
Baker, c .. .. 0
Dietrich, f.......0
harder, g.......0
Werterman, f .. 0
Walton, ^........I
GREAT LAKES (43)
Orlando, f.......2
Weiss, f......... 4
Magnusson, c ... 3
RIebe, g ........ 4
Sullivan, g 0
Grabel, f 0
Ccllier, f ........2
Schaffer, g....... 0
rfieffer, c........1
Grant, g .........1

pf
V
1
4
1
1
0
0
0
1
pf
2
5
4
2
0
0
1
1
0

tp
16
1,
15#
1
1!
0
0
tp
6
11
8
10
1
0
4
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2

NTERPRETATION of the n w Western Conference three-year rule for
varsity cormvtition ; still h'nging fire as numerous complaints and re-
quests for clarifil a n of the regulation from midwestern teams which ad-
here to Big '-en rules, vs W l as Conference members themselves, rolled
into headouarteis aUr the anual winter meeting of the circuit at Chicago.
Although the con was officia iv ended last week, Conference
Commaisshoner Kenneth L (Tug) Wilon announced that the faculty
grcap of the ig Tn boar had initiated a vote by mail of members to
decide wheth-r the three-year rule will go into effect now or at the
close of the winter seasn.
The ruling, which limits varsity competition to three years, unless a
man has played during his freshman season under wartime conditions, will
seriously disorganmze many midwestern basketball teams. according to theE
protesting schools.
The advantag<es of h din off the enforcing of the rule are evident.
While schools a4xe underging a reconversion period, improved standards
of play are necessary. With many of the veterans still in service and
not exwced back unil nex pring at the earliest, every topnotch
player as ailable should he ehgie.
Such men as George Mikan, De aul's All-American center, who has
enjoyed three seasons of competition already, would be immediately barred
from varsity athletics. Mikan is expected to be a greater drawing card
this season than last, and has scored 86 points in four games already.
Also, immcdiate cnforcement of the rule would hurt the smaller
lessor-known coleges who follow Big Ten practices. The small college,
more than any other, has been hard hit by the war, and should cer-
tainly be given every chance for a rapid recovery.
ON THE OTHER JAND, this season's basketball picture in the Western
Conference would probably result in a shoo-in for Iowa, were reinforce-
ment of the rule postponed until spring. So far, only two teams have been
affected -- Iowa and Minnesota.
If Iowa were to retain the services of three-year man Ned Postels,'
regular guard for the Conference champs last season, it would have a
veteran-studded :gregation which wculd be almost a sure bet for an-
other title. Minnesota would be able to use Max Mohr, dischargee who
completed three varsity s:casons in 1942. Whether it is advisable to re-
vise the ruling for the benefit of two teams and the possible detriment
of eight is doubtful.
The only other winter sport expected to be affected by the ruling is
indoor track; and the only school that would benefit would be Michigan.
Should three-year men be allowed to compete, Ross and Bob Hume would
be eligible to run for the Wolverines. They would certainly be a welcome
addition to Coach Ken Doherty's squad.
The reversal of the previous decision might not affect the Hume situ-
ation at all, however. At the close of the outdoor season last spring, the
twins had presumably run their last for Michigan. Both are enrolled in
medical school, and the pressure of studies was expected to keep them out
of further competition.
WHO WUZ ROBBED?
Freshmen Still Claim Victor

WELCOME:
MY -iat. Ve $I
By CHUCK LEWIS
Bill Courtright, better known to
his teammates as "Corky." recently
returned to the Michigan campus
and was, immediately elected captain
of the 1945-46 wrestling team.
Courtright was in the Army for
three and one-half years and vis-
ited seven different countries. He was
used as a forward observer in the
91st Mortar Battalion of General
George Patton's Third Army, and
served with the first battalion of
mortars to cross the Rhine River.
His biggest engagement was that of
the Battle of the Bulge.
Captain-Eleet in '42-'43
Before going overseas, he was in
the Army Specialized Training Pro-
gram and spent some time at the
Georgia Institute of Technology and
the University of Maryland.
The new wrestling captain grap-
pled in the 165-pound division prior
to going in the Army, and was cap-
tain-elect of the 1942-43 squad be-
fore his departure from campus.
While wrestling for the Maize and
Blue, he was runner-up two years in
succession for the National Inter-
collegiate title, both times being de-
feated by Gene Smith of Oklahoma
A. & M. in the championship match.j
Golf, Too!
Versatility is Courtright's forte, as
he was number two man on the golf
squad, winning his letter in that
sport to combine with the two he
earned competing for the wrestling
team.
Courtright is an Ann Arbor prod-
uct. His return will prove to be of
great help and assistance to Coach
Cliff Kenn and the present season's
wrestling prospects.

CHISTMAS CARDS with verses
r that will liger long after the holi-
dayisovever ..
Come in for your cards while we still have
a varied selection"°
FRANCISCO-BOYCE PHOTO CO.
S723North University

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By The Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Tex., Dec. 15-
Golfdom's wizard shotmaker, lean
Byron Nelson, Denton, Tex., took
charg-e .of the Fort Worth $10,000
open today, warming up the frozen
Glen Garden Country Club fair-
ways with a competitive course
record of six-under-par 65 to give
him the lead at the halfway mark
with 72-65-137.-
Lord Byron led his fellow Texan,
Jimmie Demaret. the a oung ,

I

well

Nelson oes It Again

man of the links, by a .stroke.
Smiling Jimmie posted a 67 to go
with his first round of 71.
In third place were F. JiDutclf
Harrison of Little Rock and Ed;
Furgol of Detroit, playing his firt
tour as a professional, each with
130. Furgcl had a 63 this after-
noon, Harrison a 70.
Forty-seven pros and amateurs
qualified for tomorrow's final 36
holes. It required a score of 150
to make the grade

Be a G

oodfellow

Made to 0'rder
AFTERNOON. DRESSES
EVENING DRESSES'
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As a sage once said, "It's all over
now but the shouting;" but in the
case of last night's intra-squad track
meet it seems certain that talk after
the meet over who won will long out-
last the meet itself.
Immediately after the tournament.
the scores were tabulated and it was
announced that the freshmen were
the winners. Jubilance reigned in
the Field House as the new thinclads
literally filled the arena with their
enthusiastic cheers.
Lettermen Incredulous
A somewhat downtrodden group o'
lettermen just couldn't believe it
eyes and began to look for a mistake
The totals on the scoreboard were
accurate, yet they didn't jibe with
other records, among them the tallc-
sheet kept by the Daily reporter.
In checking the scores, it was
noted that the official scorer hadn't
recorded the fourth place registerer
by Warren Bentz in the pole vaul'
On the official scorer's chart, Bentz'
entry was in light pencil and hadn'
been taken into consideration when

rack Decision

it came to adding up the points com-
piled by the "old timers."
Frosh Get Heave-Ho
The "old timers," led by their
coach, Dan Kinsey, stormed into the
dressing room to have words with the
.meet referee, Ken Doherty. The
Michigan track coach allowed Bentz's
late entry, the decision was reversed,
and the "old timers" were declared
the winners.
Completely overjoyed that they
had "saved face," the lettermen gave
out with a loud cheer. All this went
on without the knowledge of the
freshmen, who believed that they had
won. When they found out, another
lelegation went into the dressing
'oom to have words with the referee,
out this time the delegation was led
)y the coach of the freshmen, Dean
Rockwell.
The words of the outraged fresh-
nen and their coach got them no-
'here, and at this point they ap-
,eared a little downcast. To this
zinute, any member of the freshman
eam will tell you in no uncertain
germs that they "wuz robbed."

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