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October 29, 1945 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-10-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEa

THE ICHIAN AILYPAG

Personnel Office, Deaj

Many University coeds are helping
to put themselves through school by
working part-time as waitresses,
housekeepers, stenographers and
helping out in one of the University
departments.
During the past five weeks, the
Non-academic Personnel Office has
filled 206 permanent and part-time
jobs. The main purpose of the office
is to staff full-time positions on
campus, but they also help in secur-
ing part-time jobs for students. For
example, they placed several hundred
people in part-time jobs during the
Student Af fairs
Are Controlled
By Committee
All student activities except ath-
letics are supervised and controlled
by the Student Affairs Committee.
Faculty members of the committee
include Dean of Students Joseph E.
Bursley, Miss Alice Lloyd, dean of
women, and six members of the Uni-
versity Senate who are appointed for
three year terms by President Alex-
ander G. Ruthven.
In addition to the eight faculty
members, five students are members:
the managing editor of The Daily, the
presidents of the League and the
Union, the chairman of the Men's
Judiciary Council and the chairman
of the Judiciary Council of the
League.
Dean Bursley acts as chairman and,
according to University regulations,
has "summary power in the admini-
stration of all matters coming under
the jurisdiction of the committee"
except for questions involving the
adoption of or change in an estab-
lished policy, which "shall, be refer-
red to and determined by the com-
mittee as a whole."
Studyig Recommended
If You Want Good Grades
Probably the best way to get good
grades at this University-and this is
advice to you young and innocent
freshmen who will flaunt your Na-
tional Honor Society pins until you
receive five-week grades-is to stay
home every night in the week and
study.

University registration period. The
Office works with the United States
Employment Service in referring vet-
erans' wives to secretarial and steno-
graphic positions, and has helped
veterans, themselves, in getting jobs
near the campus.
Job Opportunities Fall
Most coeds, however, secure part-
time jobs through the Office of the
Dean of Women in Barbour Gym.
This Office placed 449 girls in part-
time jobs last year, but is "expecting
employment for girls to be slower
this year" as job opportunties are not1
quite as plentiful.,
Girls are needed now especially in
hourly housework jobs and employ-
ment as waitresses. On an average,
girls work ten hours a week at their
part-time jobs.
Counseling Given
Coeds who consult the Dean of
Women's Office for part-time em-
ployment are asked about their pre-
vious experience, health record and
what type of job they feel most capa-
ble of doing.
Some of the job opportunities

, Fill Jobs
which girls are aften referred to in-
clude: board and room jobs, hourly
housework, secretarial service, child
care, waitress work and jobs at the
League, University Library, Univer-
sity Hospital and University Laun-
dry.
Registration is Requested
The Office prefers to put girls into
jobs which are connected in some
way with their college courses. The
range of actual job opportunities is
far wider than the above list indi-
cates. Women students last year did
such things as feeding mice in a
University laboratory, compiling ma-
terials for a history-writing project,
handling reading material on physi-
cal education, assisting a dentist,
taking care of an invalid, ticket-tak-
ing in a downtown theatre, tutoring
a high-school student and supervis-
ing in the public schools.
Every girl who is employed is re-
quested to register at the Office of
the Dean of Women, merely for sta-
tistical purposes, according to Mrs.
Mary C. Bromage, assistant dean of
women.

U' Extension
Servire Sponsors
Lecture Series

GLOBAL REPRESENTATION:
900 Foreig Sitdents Will Be
Enrolled in V1J' This Semester

*

* *
BUY MORE BONDS

*

Dr., Mrs.
To Speak

Overstreet
at Programs

Four series of lectures by Dr. and
Mrs. Harry Overstreet, and sponsored
by the University Extension Service,
are part of the adult education pro-
gram which will continue through the
middle of December.
The eight-week non-credit courses
conducted by the Overstreets are The
Individual and Our Minority Groups;
The Development of Personality;
Home and Family Living; and a Sem-
inar in Adult Education.
Dr. Overstreet has served as re-
search associate and president of the
American Association for Adult Edu-
cation and also had written several
books including "Influencing Human
Behavior," "About Ourselves," and
"The Enduring Quest."
As teacher and educational direct-
or of the School of Related Arts and
Sciences, New York City, and in-
structor in the adult education work-
shops at Claremont and Mills col-
leges, California, Mrs. Overstreet has
also been active in the adult educa-
tion field.

According to widespread reports
circulating on campus, approximately
900 foreign students will be enrolled
in various colleges of the University
this semester.
Prof. Esson M. Gale, director of the
International Center, indicates a
great diversity of representation
exists among these students. Most
predominently represented are Indian
and Chinese students. As usual, a
goodly number of this group is Latin
American. For the first time, an in-
flux of Turkish students is noted.
"By far, most of these foreign
students," Prof. Gale commented,
"are interested in the technologi-
cal fields."
"Most are pursuing post graduate
studies in some phase of engineering.
A few are economics majors, and a
similar number, primarily women, are
interested in educational fields and
the social services."
The influx of foreign students in
the last decade has been on the up-
swing. This trend is directly trace-
able to the change in attitudes of
our neighbor countries. Especially in
China and India the government pol-
icy has turned from one of discour-
aging attendance of American uni-

versities to encouraging this move-
ment and actually sponsoring a good
many of its outstanding students in
universities abroad. This change is
also indicative of an awakening inter-
est in foreign and international af-
fairs on the part of many of these
backward and un-developed coun-
tries, he said.
Nearly all of these students on
campus are in graduate courses,
having completed their undergrad-
uate work in schools in their own
lands. Their aim is to familiarize
themselves with American equip-
ment and techniques, in order that
they may put these to use in their
own countries.
"This practice," Prof. Gale stressed,
"serves to establish America as the
country to which they will look for
standards and patterns. This will in
turn stimulate economic relations be-
tween the United States and other
nations where vast post-war develop-
ments are bound to come."

"One of the most ex-
citing pictures ever
made . .. and the
most important in
the history of the
world t"

-N.Y. MIRROR

"The Mouse

on
92nd Street'
Now Playing at the
-MICH#IGAN

_ _ -f .,

TO BE HELD NOV. 13, 15:
Extension Service To Sponsor
16th Parent-Education Institute

The 16th annual Parent Education
Institute, sponsored by the Extension
Service of the university and the
Michigan Congress of Parents and
Teachers, will be held Nov. 13 in De-
troit and Nov. 15 in Grand Rapids.-
Parent-teacher associations, child
study clubs, service clubs, ministerial
groups, the A.A.U.W., and other or-
ganization are invited to enroll, Dr.
Charles Fisher, director of the Exten-
sion Service, said yesterday.
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Overstreet, of
New York City, will headline the list
of speakers. Dr. Overstreet, who has-
worked in the field of adult education
for many years, will lead a panel at
the Detroit meeting on "What Should
Be the Nature of School Life for
Today?" Mrs. Overstreet will address.
both groups on "How To Stay Alive
As Long As You Live."
Other speakers who will participate
in the institute include, Dr. Fisher;
Dr. Stanley Dimond, director of Citi-
zenship Education Study, Detroit
Public Schools; Mrs. William DeVoe,
president of the Michigan Congress

of Parents and Teachers; Elizabeth
Irwin, lecturer in the Extension Ser-
vice for the program in adult educa-
tion; Mrs. John Hess, publicity chair-
man of the Michigan Congress of
Parents and Teachers; H. M. Talia-
ferro, president of the American Seat-
ing Company, Grand Rapids; Mrs.
John Griffin, president of the Detroit
Federation of Women's Clubs; and
Edith Thomas, chief extension librar-
ian at the University.
Special classes in typewriting, for
personal or office use. Hours ar-
ranged at your convenience. Day
and Evening Classes. Phone 7831 or
call at our office for details. No
obligation.
HAMILTON Business College
William at State Ph. 7831

PECKS DRUG STORE
FOR WHAT YOU NEED * EXCELLENT SERVICE
106 SOUTH MAIN STREET PHONE 7911
A LEXA NDE R DR U G
(Across from Hill Auditorium)
DRUGS, COSMETICS
FOUNTAIN
Quick Breakfast and Lunches

77v thin9 like it!
t 4
Famous for its
CHICKEN IN TH-E ROUGH
METZGE'R S
203 EAST WASHINGTON STREET

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