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December 13, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-12-13

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PAGIR ,SI

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUR~SDAY, DCOUtBR.i2, 1B45

_ __ __ _._
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IN TUNE WITH THE TIMES:
Christmas Dance To Feature Smith

The all-campus Christmas formal,
featuring Leroy Smith, violinist, and
his orchestra and sponsored by theE
Latin-American Society, will take1
place from 9 to 12 p.m. tomorrow in
the League Ballroom.1
Smith has played for several sea-
sons at the Reisenwebers Paradise
Roof, New York City several well-1
known hotels and for 17 weeks at
the Mayfair Casino, Cleveland. He
has co-starred in famous New YorkT
Colored Revues such as "Rhapsody int
Black" with Ethel Water and Con-1
nies Hot Chocoaltes.
Floor Show Plannedl
A floor show, including ballroom
dancing is'planned for the iftermis-
sion. Tickets may still be purchased
at the League, the Union and the In-
ternational Center, or at the door.
Patrons for the dance are Presi-
dent and Mrs. Alexander G. Ruth-
ven, Dean Joseph Bursley, Dean and
LA TINS:
Society Is
Cultural and
Social Center
Providing Latin American students
on campus with a social and cultural
center, and aiming to establish closer
relations with North American uni-
versity people, the Latin American
Society serves a valuable function on
the campus.
The society is composed of uni-
versity students born or now living in
Latin American countries.
Presents Culture
Following its aim to establish
closer relations with North American
university people, the Society pre-
sents to them the various aspects of
the life and culture of their neigh-
bors to the south. The aim of the So-
ciety is to be accurate in its presen-
tation of Latin America. The bad is
presented with the good.
In the last two years, more than 20
outstanding lectures offered under
the auspices of the Society have been
given by Latin Americans who have
finished their university work in the
educational institutions of South
America. Discussion followed each
lecture, led by different members of
the University faculty.
The lecture series was organized
and planned by Dr. Esson M. Gale,
director of the International Center
and Prof. Julio del Toro of the Ro-
mance Language department.
Social Activities
The social activities of the Society,
attended by a large number of North
American students and faculty mem-
bers, have tended to create better un-
derstanding and friendship among
the many peoples of the western
hemisphere.
This year's officers of the Latin
American Society are Gilberto Pes-
quera of Porto Rico, president; Au-
gusto Malabet of Colombia, treas-
urer; and Prof. del Toro of the Ro-
mance Language department, sec-
retary.
Buy Victory Bonds!

Mi,. Peter OkIeb i r Dean anti Mrs.
Walter Rea, Dean and Mrs. Hayward
Keniston, Dr. and Mrs. Esson Cale,
Dean Alice Lloyd, Dean and Mrs.
Walter Emmons and Dr. and Mrs.
Frank Copley.
Patrons Continue
Rev. Father Frank McPhillips,
Prof. and Mrs. Warren W. Chase,
Prof. and Mrs. Karl Lagler, Prof. and
Mrs. Frederick Sparrow, Prof. and
Mrs. Malcolm Soule Prof. and Mrs.
Carl LaRue, Prof. and Mrs. Arthur
Aiton, Prof. and Mrs. Irving Leon-
ardd, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Klinger,
Dr. and Mrs. Buenaventura Jimenez,
University Club
Will Hold First
Family Night'
The University club, composed
chiefly of members of the faculty, will
hold its first "family night" Tuesday
at its club room in the Michigan Un-
ion, Prof. J. L. Brumm, president of
the club announced.
The program will consist of faculty
chorus singing under the direction
of Prof. Hardin vap Deursen, an orig-
inal dramatic skit satirizing the mis-
adventures of education, several ad-
dresses and a motion picture of the
Army-Michigan game.
International Center
To Omit Program
The regularly scheduled Sunday
evening program of the International
Center will be omitted this week so
that all students affiliated with the
Center and its other friends may at-
tend the All-campus Carol Sing.
Following the sing, coffee and
doughnuts will be served these stu-
dents at a social hour at the Inter-
national Center.

Prof. and Mrs. Emerlindo Mercado,
Prof. and Mrs. Julio del Toro, Prof.
and Mrs. Charles Fries, Dean and
Mrs. Samuel Dana, Dr. and Mrs. A.
ozon.
Churches Plan.
Holiday Parties
For Weekend
Christmas activities for students
will get underway this weekend when
special Christmas parties are held in
the various churches.
"Candy Cane capers" is the title
of the Christmas party to be held
from 9 p.m. to midnight tomorrow
in the Presbyterian Church. Danc-
ing, singing, games, and refreshments
will be features of the party.
The Congregational Disciples Guild
will hold a Christmas party from 7:30
p.m. to midnight Saturday in the
Guild house. Trimming the Christ-
mas tree will be part of the party's
activities.
The Unitarian group Christmas
party will begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
The party will be held in the Unita-
rian Church.
The Newman Club will hold its an-
nual Christmas party from 8 p.m. to
midnight tomorrow. The party will
be held in St. Mary's Student Chapel,
and the Navy Band will play. Navy
students have. been granted a late
permission for the party.
Carol singing and gift exchange
will be features of the Christmas
party to be given by the Wesleyan
Foundation of the Methodist Church.
The party will begin at 8 p.m. tomor-
row in the Foundation Lounge.
The Canturbury Club of St. An-
drews Episcopal Church will begin its
Christmas party at 6 p.m. Sunday in
the student center. Prof. Allen F.
Sherzer of the engineering college
will show movies of the Arctic region
to the group. A discussion will follow.

Campus SFirs
I 1o0Be Sna
City lf'Y eI"vtal
Mattern To Il-ceet
The first all city-campus commun-
ity sing sponsored by the Student Re-
ligious Association will be held at 8
p.m. Sunday on the steps of theiihi-
versity library.
Previously a carol sig was held an-
nually for students but this year the
residents of Ann Arbor have been in-
vited to attend.
Dr. David Mattern, professor of
music education in the School of
Music and in the School of Educa-
tion, will open the program with the
group singing Christmas carols ac-
companied by a brass quartet. Na-
tivity scenes under the direction of
Eileen Lay will be staged on the li-
brary steps.
Following the campus sing Marilyn
Mason, chairman of the music com-
mittee for the Student Religious As-
sociation, invites all students to an
open house at Lane Hall.
For Peace and Prosperity-
Victory Bonds-fo Have
and To hold

Union Formal
in jol.pons'e to the many queries
i'o3rrnting the status ol' ceorsa~ges
rat the Ui nion F~ormiat Satuirda.Y, the
io tli (icuncil Wisheq tort-fonwe
that flowers will be presented to
coeds as they enter the dance.
Corsages are not banned, but are
unnecessary, according to Sandy
Perlis, president of the Council.

DANGER IN SECRECY:
Dr. Barker Re-echoes Warning
Of Other Scientists on A-Bomb

>

State stor
To Meet Herer
Annual Conference To
Be Attended by 350
More than 350 ministers represent-
ing Churches throughout Michigan
are expected to attend the annual
Pastors' Conference to be held Jan.
21-23 on the University campus.
Sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service and the Michigan
Council of Churches and Christian
Education, the conference will be
highlighted by a series of four lec-
tures by Dr. Paul J. Tilliech.
Forums will be held on the follow-
ing topics: "Education Programs of
the Church," "The Evangelistic Pro-
gram of the Church" and "Social
Action Program of the Church."

"Scientists, in general, have ex-
pressed themselves as being opposed
to secrecy that will develop ill-will
among nations" Dr. E. F. Barker,
nead of the physics department,
stated in a recent interview.
He explained that the scientists
"do not believe that we can prevent
Torbalballa Is
Moved To Math
Dr. L. V. Torbalballa of the Uni-
versity of the Philippines has been
tranferred from the University's
Army training program to a new po-
sition as instructor in the math de-
partment.
Dr. Torbalballa, who completed his
undergraduate educationin his na-
tive Philippines, received his doc-
tor's degree at Michigan in 1941. He
has been associated with the Philip-
pine government insurance system,
Michigan State College, the army
training program and Princeton's
Institute of Advanced Study.

other nations from manufacturing
weapons similar to ours within a rel-
atively short time."
Dr. Barker emphasized America's
dependence on fission, the type of ex-
plosion inherent in atoms, in her de-
velopment of the atomic bomb. In-
formation defining fission was pub-
lished widely in Germany in 1939;
therefore, other nations have access
to the knowledge which formed the
very foundation for our experi-
ments.
The Atomic Scientists of Chicago
repeated Dr. Barker's warning when
they declared, "The greatest secret
in connection with the atomic bomb
was the fact that it was possible to
develop it successfully. Other coun-
tries should be able to produce
atomic bombs in two to five years."
Dr. Barker expiained, "Many sci-
entists would have been relieved if
they could have proved that this
weapon was impossible to produce.
Science wants to bring knowledge,
not annihilation, to mankind."

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Copr. 1945 AOGER d GALLET

THERE ARE MORE RUSH-TIMES
.'f"wR R O EON LONG DISTANCE
There are many more Long Dis-
tance calls than last year and
more rush-time peaks. One big
reason is the calls of returning
r5 veterans.
Unfortunately we're still
short of circuits to many places.
The big job expanding the Long
Distance network is being
pushed ahead as fast as pos-
sible, but it will take time.
So right now, it's as impor-
tant as ever to "please limit
your call to 5 minutes" when
the operator requests it. A ser-

HUM OR MAGAZINE
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CARTOONS

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