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December 02, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,

DECEMBER 2, 1945

Micigan Sextet

Couquers Spitfires

in First

Tilt

Cager s

Triumph in Home Opener

Puck
With

Team Inaugurates Season

7-2

Win over

Quintet Outclasses State
In Second Scheda led Tilt

Spartans Downed
By 47-39 Count
(Continued from Page 1)
two-pointer by Roberts gave the
Spartans a 5-4 edge.
Strack and Selbo then followed with
a long set shot and a charity toss,
handing Michigan a 7-5 margin, and
placing the Wolverines in the lead
which they never relinquished.
Halftime Lead
Playing fast and accurate ball, and
making the majority of shots count,
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's boys in-
creased their lead to seven points on
goal tosses by Harrison and Selbo, and
Mullaney's foul shot. Two State bas-
kets closed the gap to four points
after 13 minutes of play, but the
seven field goals and one charity toss.

Five baskets and three free

throwsI

Good Omen!

netted Sam Fortino, Michigan State's
major threat, 13 points for the sec-
ond-highest total, while Selbo, Michi-
gan's center, and Robin Roberts, For-
tino's fellow-forward, snatched third-
place honors with 10 markers apiece.
MSC Scores First
A backboard shot by Bill Krall,
MSC center, in the opening 30 sec-
onds of play, drew first blood for
the Spartans, but before the minute
was up, John Mullaney countered for
the Wolverines with a set shot from
Maize and Blue cagers opened up to
finish the half eight points to the
good.
Fortino started the second frame
with a foul and a set shot, bringing
the score to 24-19, the nearest the
MSC boys got to pay-dirt during the
remaining minutes of play. Sparked
by Marty Feinberg, Maize and Blue
center, Mullaney, and Harrison,
Michigan went ahead to the tune of
43-27 with only seven minutes left to
play.
Oosterbaan Pleased
Oosterbaan's men settled down to
a steady game, while MSC sank five
gold-mine shots and two handouts to
boost their final total to 39 points.
A field goal and foul shot by Harri-
son, plus a similar gift-shot by new-
comer Bob Baker, raised the Wolver-
ines' closing count to a winning 47.
Coach Oosterbaan was well pleased
with Michigan's showing, stating, "I
think the boys did a really fine job
for their first home game. They were
playing against a smooth-working,
experienced group of men and put up
a fine battle. Naturally, some rough
spots remain, and there is room for
a lot of improvement, but I believe
we can work all of that out in the
next few weeks."
The Wolverines now have a record
of two victories, as against no de-
feats, for the current season. In a
previous match against Central
Michigan, the Maize and Blue quin-
tet came through with a 68-45 win.
Harrison, top-scorer of last night's
match, annexed similar honors in the
Chippewa battle, chalking up 19
points.

FF ITHE KEYBOARD t
By MARY LU B EATH x
Associate Sports Editor
XWE UNDERSTAND that our colleague, Mullendore, intends to answer
the question, "What's it like in the press box?", in a subsequent1
column. This, he says, is the most frequently-posed query he has come upt
against in his years on The Daily sports staff. All this set us to wondering1
just what people have most consistently asked us about sports reporting.
Finally, we decided that "What's it like to be a woman sports reporter?"
stands head and shoulders above the rest.
We would like to make it clear that we do not advocate sports as a career
for most women journalists. Although there have been some female exam-1
ples in the field, they have never been preeminently successful. But in the1
college field, they have been able to match their male competitors line for
line of typewritten material. The outstanding success story in the Big Ten
schools, as far as we are concerned, was that of Jill Drum, sports editor on
the Daily Illini at the University of Illinois last spring.
The layman will tell you that most women interested in sports are
buxom, masculine, and muscular. We stand just over five feet two inches,
and have certainly never been considered the athletic type. We are not
well-coordinated and, physically, have none of the characteristics com-
mronly attributed to the female sports reporter.
As far as our experience goes, a woman is able to keep up with a man
on all of the mental work connected with the trade. She has just as good
a brain for statistics, just as good a "nose for news", and just as good an
ability to write sports copy.
Where the woman sports reporter gets into trouble is in covering her
beat. She is, frankly, unable to enter the sanctum sanctorum of the coaches
and athletes-the locker room. Instead, she must either miss out on a good
story entirely, or send a legman into the inner recesses to get the informa-
tion she needs to write her story.
W HEN WE FIRST wandered into Yost Field House to cover the opening
of baseball practice in the spring of '44, we did so with much trepida-
tion and trembling. Looking neither to the right nor the left did not help,
because onrushing trackmen were likely to cut anyone down on sight. We
soon learned that a "pedestrian" walks on the inside of the track. We have
never been extra cordially received by players. That is quite understand-
able. They are simply unused to having a woman enter the premises on
which they are practicing. But on interviews and special features, they
have always cooperated perfectly.
Coaches, with whom we have had to deal more closely, are different. But
they have always been very helpful in giving the "dope" on their teams,
and have adopted the same attitude towards us as towards other reporters.
They all have different techniques. Baseball Coach Ray Fisher can give an
interview while teaching a boy to pitch. Basketball Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan waits until after practice to meet the press. We always suspected that
coaches have been a little kinder to us than to others because of the
limitations placed on us in getting stories. I
We have never been able to get in the football press box during the
regular season. That has been a handicap,- although we have covered
pre-season practice games. But we hold no grudge against Athletic
Director "Fritz" Crisler. After all, the regulation must be for the best.
Both Crisler and ourselves came to Michigan from New Jersey, so we
understand each other.
We did have one unfortunate experience in our sports work. The third
time we went to the Field House, someone left the door of the locker room

By DES HOWARTH while his teammate, Grant,
Jumping off to a five-goal lead in goal and two assists.
the first period, the Wolverine hockey The forward line of Celley
team lived up to advance expectations and Walt Gacek scored fou
by easily submerging the Windsor seven goals with Gacek add
Spitfires, last year's Ontario Junior ether one. Forward Al Renfr
Champs, by a score of 7-2 before a ter Gordon MacMillen, an
capacity crowd at the Coliseum here Smith, defenseman, were U
last night. goal-getters for the varsity.
gRenfrew Scores
Coach e H i r a le r ed three Al Renfrew opened the sc
lines and used five defensemen in the Coach VeHyie' rw
opening encounter, and at all times hecuckypast glige s cew,
the Wolverines were at full strength t 2:21 of the first period. L
Michigan had speed and was aggres- a minute later, Gacek tooL
sive, keeping the puck in the Wind- from Grant and Celley in
sor end of the arena most of the eve- the net to get the Maize a
ning. The defensive play of the Wol- packmen off to a flying sta
veries left little to be desired as the starting line on the i
they back-checked and covered inside MacMillen added another t
their blue line like veterans. ogson assisting. h
Celley, Grant, Gacek Lead Attack With less than two minute
Michigan scored first counter in in the frame, Michigan sc
less than three minutes, and after more quick goals. Grant slam
adding five more scores, coasted to in from a pile-up in front of
victory in the final stanzas. Lead-ing Celley and Gacek got assist
the Wolverine attack were wingmen added the fifth counter seco
Neil Celley and Wally Grant, both after Hill and Grant had se
from Eveleth, Minn. Celley coun- play.
tered two goals and three assists, But the First periods actio

MICHIGAN 8

5'

Windsor Club
added a stop here. Just before the stanza
ended, Sam Steadman and Spitfire
y, Grant, defenseman Jack Brown collided be-
r of the hind the Windsor nets, and the fur
ding the began to fly. With all the men on
*ew, cen- the ice either trying to add their bit
nd Ross or separate potential contestans, the
he other referees finally broke up the melee,
sending both Steadman and Brown
to the penalty box with five minutes
oring for fighting penalties.
banging Windsor Scores in Third
Reynolds Althought the second stanza was
kess than scoreless. it was nevertheless action-
t a pass packed. The Spitfires gave the Wol-
front of verines quite a battle, but only the
and Blue brilliant work of Reynolds prevented
rt. With Heyliger's squad from adding more to
ce again, their total.
ally, Jac-
allyJac-Celley opened the final period, s'cor-
s to play ing shortly after the face-off, with
ored two Grant getting another assist. Smith
nmed one concluded the Wolverines' scoring
the goal. after grabbing Celley's pass and beat-
s. Celleying Reynolds with a hard shot to the
nds later corner, to run the count to 7-0.
et up the Windsor finally broke into the
scoring column with Marchand inter-
n did not cepting a pass and shoving the puck
to Jack Brown, who countered. Wing-
Dec. 4, at man Earl Keyes and Defenseman Lou
m 304. Paolattotcombined for the other
rn 304. Spitfire tally.
Club will
8:00 p.m. F1ying! Start!
lover, As-
and As- WINDSOR Pos. MICHIGAN
ical Gar-
ersity of Reynolds G Maclnnes
s with a Paolatto RD Hill
nusual or Dutchuk L D Cossalter
mens." Montforton C MacMillen
Haidy R W Jacobson
Club will Russ LW Renfrew
nstead of

TATE

Fortino, F. .......
Roberts, F.......
Roberts, F. .......
Mazza, F. .........
Granak, F. .......
Jones, F. ........
Krall, C. .........
Cawood, C.........
Peppler, G. .......
Pjesky, G..........
White, G..........
Waldron, G.....
TOTALS...........

G F
,...5 3
...4 2
.4 2
. 0 1
..0 0
..0 0
...1 9
. ..0 0
...3 0
. 0

P
0
2
2
1
0
0
4
1
2
4
1
0
15
P
4
4
0
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
0
0
18

TP
13
10
10
*1
0
0
4
3
2
0
6
0
39
TP
15
7
0
.1
0
10
4
6
0
4
0
0
47

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued.from Page 4)
dent who is interested in a program
of fellowship and service to the
campus is invited also. Alpha Phi
Omega is a service fraternity whose
membership is composed of former
Boy Scouts.
Science Research Club: The De-
cember meeting of the Science Re-
search Club will be held on Tuesday,
Dec. 4, 1945, in the Amphitheatre of
the Horace H. Rackham School of
Graduate Studies at 7:30 p. m. Pro-
gram: The Pharmacology of the Tet-
raethyl Ammonium Ion, G. K. Moe,
Dept. of Pharmacology. Fossil Plants
of the Michigan Coal Basin. Chester
A. Arnold, Dept. of Botany.
Post-War Councils: All members
and former members of the Post-War
Council and any interested students
are requested to attend an organiza-

tional meeting on Tuesday,]
7:30 p.m. in the Union, Roo
The Women's ResearchC
meet on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at
in the West Lecture Room
ham Building. Dr. Elzada C
sistant Professor of Botany
sistant Curator in the Botani
dens, will talk on "Univ
Michigan Botanical Garden
Demonstration of Certain U
Otherwise Interesting Speci
The Graduate Outing f
meet Wednesday, Dec. 5, it
Dec. 4, because of the(
Forum scheduled for Dec.4
one interested in outdoor
are cordially invited to me
Outing Room at 7:30 p. m.
Veteran's Wives: Let's ma:
Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 7:3
the Grand Rapid§ Room
League.
Le Cercle Francais will me
day, Dec. 6, at 8:00 p.m. at 1
ham Building. Dr. FrancisI
the Romance Language De
(Continued on Page 7

MICHIGAN G
Harrison, F..........7
Mullaney, F.........2
Harder, F. .........0
Baker, F. ...........0
Dietrich, F. ..........0
Selbo, C......... ....4
Feinberg, C...........1
Strack, G.............3
Kell, G. .............. Q
Walton, G............ 2
Elliott, G. ...........0
Gregor, G. ...........0
TOTALS .............19

F
1
3
0
1
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
9:

Graduate
4. Every-
activities
et in the
ke friends
0 p.m. in
of the
et Thurs-
the Rack-
Gravit of
epartment
)

Your Nair Cut ...
is blended - shaped - to
your facial features. Our
six barbers welcome you to
try our services.
The Doscola Barbers
Between Stateaand Michigan
Theaters

SoRRY. FOLK~S-
GAM WS OFF-
BOT -TE1AMS
9 4ENT NOME
j! TOLItE 14
CC CDA u t?

Detroit Lions
Football
games
Dial
1050

open. The locker room is'at the end of
glanced down the corridor. We have nev
and continue to avoid it like the plague
Lions To Seek
Second Place
In Pro League
DETROIT, Dec. 1 - (') - Second
place in final Western Division stand-
ings in the National Football League
is the prize here tomorrow as the De-
troit Lions close their 1945 season
against the Green Bay Packers, a
team they hoven't beaten over a
stretch of 10 straight games.
The Packers, who jammed a total
of 41 points into one period while
lambasting the Lions 57 to 21 nearly
two months ago, will be favored to ex-
tend their domination of the series
against. a Detroit eleven which nose-
dived out of the title race by losing
to New York and Cleveland in its last
two starts.
Both Green Bay and Detroit go into
the season finale with identical rec-
ords of six wins and three defeats.
The Packers have bowed to Cleve-
land's Western Division champs twice

a long corridor, and we innocently
ver felt the same about that corridor,
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