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November 25, 1945 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE E TTTlEMCGA IiL

..

Recently

Appointed Senior

Editors of The

Daily

Rubber Surplus
Anticipated for
Next Few Years
International Group of:
Experts Report Finding
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 -
Tire-hungry motorists take note -
the world now faces a huge rubber
surplus for the next two or three
years.
This is the conclusion of an inter-
national "Rubber Study Group" of
American, British, French and Dutch
experts. They have just concluded a,
meeting in London and their report
was released simultaneously here and
there.
It contains no recommendations for
production controls among the na-
tions which produce natural and syn-
thetic rubber, so that the way ap-
parently is left open for intense com-
petition on a cost basis between the.
manufacturers of synthetic rubber in
this country and the producers of
natural rubber in the Malaya-Dutch
Indies area.

PICTURED ABOVE ARE SIX NEW DAILY SENIOR EDITORS. Reading from left to right, they are Robert Goldman, city editor; Betty Roth, edi torial director; Arthur J. Kraft, associate
editor; Bill Mullendore, sports editor, and Dorothy Flint, business mana ger. Not shown, but also appointed associate editor for the fall term is Margaret Farmer. Ray Dixon, managing
from last semester.

editor; Ann Schutz, women's
editor, retained his position

POUNDING OUT PLAYS:
Inspiration Not Nec essary--Ma bie

Half of 8,300,000 Army Should
Be Discharged byMid-December

-l

Holiday

By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Ia., Nov. 24 -
Pound out enough bad plays and
you'll likely write a good one now
an then, assuming you have a vivid
imagination, of course . . .
That's the belief of Prof. E. C. Ma-
bie, head of the University of Iowa
dramatic arts department.
Three shows currently on Broad-
way, written by his former stu-
dents, back the professor's system.
Two of the plays, "Glass Menag-
erie" and "You Touched Me" were
authored by Tennessee Williams.'
Howard Richardson and William
Berney, both former Iowa students,
turned out "Dark of the Moon."
Other Iowa students have made
notable successes in Hollywood.
Prof. Mabie thinks nothing of re-
quiring his students to do as many
as 18 plays in a nine-month school
year, hoping three or four will be
worthy foundations for future pol-
ished manuscripts. He recalls that
Richard Maibaum once wrote 14 plays
under this "mass production" system,
three of which hit Broadway.
"We don't let our students sit
around tapping their pencils and
waiting for an inspiration to strike
them," Maibe says.a
"Pencil tappers" are given a
newspaper, told to find a theme for
a play and are required to write,
direct and produce the play in nine
days.
"After all, most playwrights don't
know how to write for the stage,"'
Prof. Mabie said. "They can't sit at
a typewriter and write a perfect play.
Actually, the play is formulated right
on the stage, while the actors are1
rehearsing and while they are giving,
their first few performances."
Howard Richardson had to be
"taken by the collar and forced to
work," the professor related. "I gave
him the Barbara Allen legend and
told him to get busy and quit fool-
ing around. 'Dark of the Moon' re-
sulted."
Willingness to work, long and
hard, is one of a playwright's chief
Polish Youths Sent to1
America To Study
DETROIT, Nov. 24 -(A)- Thirty-
two Polish youths, sponsored by the
Catholic Bishops Committee of the
United States, were en route to De-
troit today to attend school at St.
Mary's College and Seminary at Or-
chard Lake.
The youths, many orphaned during
the war, arrived in this country from
Bombay, India, where they were sent
after being released from Siberia by
the Russian Army.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
E. Washington Street. Miss Evelyn
Olsen has arranged a devotional and
musical program in the Thanksgiving
theme. Open House at the Student
Center on Saturday evening.
Zion Lutheran Church will hold its
regular Sunday morning service at
10:30.
Trinity Lutheran Church will also
hold its regular Sunday morning wor-
ship service at 10:30.
University Lutheran Chapel: Ser
vice Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Sermon by
the Rev. Alfred Scheips, "Shall We
Still Believe in Hell?"

assets, Prof. Mabie claims. An alert
imagination is another requirement,
but imagination can be stimulated
considerably by work.
Williams, remembered here as
"Tom," underwent the nine-play
newspaper treatment. Subsequently,
one of the plays he wrote here reached
Broadway.
Mabie recalls Williams as a student
"who didn't have much money, was
very sensitive, and made you always
want to do something for him." He
was skillful particularly in creating
women characters and tender scenes.
Many plays are sent to the Iowa
theater for criticism. Prof. Mabie
reads each one and then discusses
it with members of his staff and
with advanced students. Sometimes
the plays are staged experimentally,
and the authors may come to make
alterations during rehearsals.
Lt. Robert Anderson, a Harvard
graduate who Prof. Mabie believes
shows promise, has pages of notes and
suggestions on one of his plays wait-
Paul Hagen To
Speak on Labor
Union Leader, Author
Will Be Here Friday
Paul Hagen, former German and
Austrian trade union leader, will dis-
cuss "European Labor in the Post-
War World" at 4:15 p. m. Friday in
Rm. 101 Economics Building.
"Paul Hagen" is a pseudonym used
by Karl B. Frank since he became a
refugee from Hitlerism ten years ago.
During World War II Mr. Hagen
served as research director of the
American Friends of German Free-
dom which issued "Inside Germany
Reports."
Mr. Hagen is the author of "Will
Germany Crack?" and "Germany Af-
ter Hitler." In "Germany After Hit-
ler" he discusses the position of labor
elements in the underground oppo-
sition to Hitler, and the part which
they are likely to play since the Nazi
defeat.
Mr. Hagen comes to Michigan un-
der the auspices of the Workers Edu-
cations Service of the University of
Michigan, and will speak to a number
of labor groups in Detroit and other
cities.
Gas Strike Causes
Ilackout in London
LONDON, Nov. 24 - (P) - Streets
were blacked out in 23 London bor-
oughs tonight as an unofficial strike
of 2,000 gas workers in Essex cut gas
supplies in half.

ing for his return from overseas. The
Iowa theater presented his "Coming
Marching Home" even though it need-
ed alterations. Now he will have the
necessary data for making improve-
ments.
Mabie's protegesaeso have been
successful on the screen. Maibaum
has written the scripts for several
successful movies. E. P. Conkle
wrote "Prologue to Glory," and Dan
Totherah did "Moor Born." Both
were staged here first.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 - The
job of demobilizing America's huge
second World War Army of 8,300,000
is expected to be half-way completed
by mid-December, soon after another
drop in discharge points becomes ef-
fective.
Changes Effective Dec. 1
Effective Dec. 1, changes in the
point system will make an additional
783,000 men and women eligible to
return to civilian life. The latest War
Department figures show that from

University Radio Programs
The University Broadcasting Service will broadcast the following
programs for the week of Nov. 26 to Dec. 3.
MONDAY:
Station WKAR

May 12 through Nov. 16 a total of
3,114,000 had been released. About
287,000 are being discharged every
week.
On the basis of the present dis-
charge rate and. the accelerated rate
in December, at least half of the
army should be out of uniform by
Dec. 12, or six months after V-E Day.
Officers' Points Will Drop
On Dec. 1 the discharge score for
all male officers, except those in the
Medical Department, will drop from
75 to 73. Officers also can be re-
leased if they have four years and
three months of honorable service.
Likewise they can leave the army if
they have reached the age of fifty
years.
The point score for enlisted men
on Dec. 1 will drop 5 points to 55.
Also they will be eligible for release
if they have four years of honorable
military service or have three or more
dependent children under 18 years
of age.
The Air Forces have authorized re-
lease of enlisted men within the con-
tinental United States if they are de-
clared surplus and if they have two
years service and 50 points.

We have gifts galore this
Christmas for every wom-
an on your list. From six-
teen to sixty, they'll adore
our lovely lingerie toasty-
warm housecoats and bed
jackets.

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Highlights

2:30 p.m.

2:45 p.m.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.. m.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:15 p. m.
2:30 p. m.
2:45 p. m.
Station WPAG
3:15 p. m.
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p. m.
Station WJR
11:15 p.m.

U of M STUDENTS QUIZ THEIR PROFESSORS OF
EDUCATION
"Compulsory Military Training"
William Clark Trow, Professor of Education inter-
viewed by a panel of veterans: W. Robert Dixon,
Edward C. Moore, Paul E. Schwartz, and George
G. Mallinson.
SCIENCE SERIES
"The Post-War Automobile"
Walter E. Lay, Professor of Mechanical Engineering
CAMPUS NEWS
Prepared by the University News Service and pre-
sented by students enrolled in broadcasting class-
es: John Fletcher from Chelsea, Shirley Pope from
Dearborn, and Constance Schwartz from Detroit.
THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
"Hell Hath No Fury" by Blanche Sanders; directed
by Prof. David Owen.
Cast includes: Joyce Donen, James Land, Rosalyn
Long, Clark Marlor, Lois McIntyre, Ruth Schnoor,
Mrs. Ruth Stearn, Mrs. Lucy Chase Stephenson,
and Mary Ellen Wood.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SER-
IES, "Business Prospects, 1919 and 1946"
O. W. Blackett, Professor of Statistics.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
A song cycle "On Wenlock Edge" by William Vaugh-
an for Tenor, Piano and Stling quartet.
Messrs. Arthur Hackett, Joseph Brinkman, Wassily
Besekirsky, Milton Weber and Hanns Pick.
MICHIGAN SPORT PARADE
Les Etter, Public Relations Manager for the Board
in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics.
THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Are Anemias and Other Blood Disorders Inherited?"
Dr. Frank Bethell
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Burns"
Dr. Kenneth Campbell

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A HINT. TO THE CLEVER -
A WORD TO THE WISE-
- - ;

-v-rcflflR -

A WARNING TO TH E PU II
STPIRT HOPPING
TO YOUR
CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
RIGHT NOW!

THE IDEAL CHRISTMAS GIFT
/ from nW
SOLDIER OF DEMOCRACY by Kenneth S. Davis . . . . . . . . . 3.00
A full length Biography of Dwight Eisenhower
TRY AND STOP ME by Bennett Cerf . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.00
THE HUMAN LIFE OF JESUS by John Erskine . . . . . . . . 3.00'
OUTSIDE EDEN by Isabel Scott Rorick . . . . . . . . . . . 2.00
SILVERSIDES by Robert Trumbull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.50
DESERT ISLAND DECAMERON by H. Allen Smith. . . . . . . . 2.50Q
SO WELL REMEMBERED by James Hilton. . . . . . . . . . . . 2.50
THE PEACOCK SHEDS HIS TAIL by Alice Tisdale Hobart. . . 2.75

REMEMBER:
Your stores are short of trained salespeople* ! The earlier you
start your gift shopping, the better and faster the service.
REMEMBER:0
Your stores are short of some kinds of gifts! One day we've got it-
the next day we're out. The earlier you start your gift shopping,
the better your chances of getting all the things you want. (Of
course, we have the perfect gift every day: Victory Bonds.)
REMEMBER:
Your Post Office is short of manpower! The earlier you start your
Christmas mailing, the surer you are that your gifts'll get where
they're going on time.

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