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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

________________THE MICHIGaN DA-ILY SA

ANCIENT THOUGHT TODAY:
W. I. Hammill,

2.

_ _ -- _-:
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'93,

ON (:A-1I'LUS

Gives Contest Prize

A prize fund of $100, established by
Mr. W. J. Hammill, '93, will be
awarded the winner of an essay con-
test on topics concerning the perti-
nence of moderriess of ancienit
thought in the fields of history, eco-
nomics and political science.
Frats To Elect
Representatives
Executive Committee
Members To Aid IFC
Fraternity presidents will meet at
7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Interfra-
ternity Council office to elect a new
executive committee of the IFC.
Members of the executive commit-
tee represent fraternity districts and
frequently act for the Council on
non-policy matters.
A fourth rushing list has been dis-
tributed to the fraternities containing
21 names. Students on this list may
be pledged afternDec. 7, while stu-
dents on the third rushing list may
be pledged after Dec. 3.
Total rushing, tabulations reveal
400 IFC registrants, of which 152 are
Veterans.

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired.
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

The contest is open to all under-
graduates in the University. Essays,
which must be between 10 and 20
thousand words long, must be sub-
mitted to the committee of judges by
March 15: The winner will receive
the prize money at Honors Convoca-
tion.
Professors To Judge
Professors Palmer A. Throop, Jo-
seph E. Kallenbach and William B.
Palmer, respectively of the history,
political science and economics de-
partments, will judge the essays. Con-
testants are requested to consult any
member of the committee before pre
paring manuscripts.
The committee will provide each
contestant with a bibliography of ap-
proximately 30. great books which
are to form the basis for the disserta-
tion. They will also explain the pre-
scribed form and documentation for
the papers.
Topics for Essays
Topics for the contest include
theories of relationships between hu-
man ecology and political systems;
relationships between political sys-
tems, ethical values and the concept
of personal property; and the indi-
vidual and the state.
Mr. Hammill, who lives in Omaha,
Neb., spent most of his life up to the
time of his retirement in 1935 in the
field of education. His main work
has been in the fields of history, eco-
nomics and commerce.
Interest in Jefferson
As he explained in a letter to Prof.
Throop, his interest in the great
books and their influence today arose
while he was doing specialized study
on Thomas Jefferson and the forces
which converted him into a power-
ful democrat. He discovered that the
basis for Jefferson's political and
ethical philosophy lay in the books
which contributed to his education.
Led to an investigation of the in-
Aiuence of great books "in the intel-
lectual life of society and individu-
als," Mr. Hammill became convinced
"that Voltaire was right when he
said 'Books rule the world.'"
About 10 years ago Mr. Hammill
donated a collection of Jeffersonia to
the University.
Veteras..
(Continued from Page 1
study, analysis of material, and prep-
aration of examinations.
No degree credit will be given fo
this refresher work. The course will
be conducted in accordance with
regulations of the Veterans Adminis-
tration to allow full subsistence to
those veterans who enroll for twelve
hours of refresher work. The special
fee charged by the University for pro-
gram ($35.00 for out-State students
and $25.00 for in-State students) will
be paid by the U. S. Veterans Admin-
istration. Late registration will be
open only on special recommendation
of the academic adviser.
Vets Must Be Accepted
The refresher course will be open
only to those veterans whose applica-
tions for admittance to the University
have been accepted.
The veteran will consult with his
academic adviser to secure approval
of his refresher program before at-
tending classes in the refresher pro-
program. During the refresher period
there will be opportunity for each
veteran to receive additional assis-
tance from his academic adviser in
planning his regular academic pro-
gram. His vocational objective may
be reviewed through consultation
with faculty members and the Vet-
erans' Service Bureau.

ADMIRAL HALSEY QUITS SEA - Officers and men salute Admiral
William F. Halsey as he goes over the side of the battleship South
Dakota at Long Beach, Calif., after relinquishing command of the
Third Fleet.
Churh News

In keeping with the sp irit of
hfomecoming, numerous c amp tis1
residences will hold open nouse
after today's game.
Alumni, students, veterans ad
parents are among those who lve
been invited to attend. Houses ex-
tending invitations are Pi Befa Phi,
Delta Delta Delta, Adelia Cheever,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Kappa Al-
pha Theta, Alpha Epusilon Phi, Del-
ta Gamma, Zeta Tao Allpha Sigma
Delta Tau, Betsy Rarbour and
Helen Newberry.
* **
Hillel Recordi C4oncer'g
Avukah, student Zionist Organiza-
tion, will hold a record concert of
Jewish music at 7:45 p.m. tomorrow
at Hillel Foundation.
Beth Laikin, president of Avukab,
is in charge of the program.
Recognition Night Tickets
Tickets for Assembly Recognition
Night will be on sale from 11 a, m.
to noon today in the League.
Meat, Butter
Off Raioni List
WASHINGTON, Nov. 23-(!P)-Ra-
tioning of all meats, canned fish, and
food fats and oils, including butter,
was ordered abandoned effective at
midnight tonight.
The sweeping action left sugar as
the only food commodity, and tires
the only non-food item, remaining
under the rationing programs insti-
tuted early in the war to assure sup-
plies for military requirements and
to provide equitable distribution.
Besides butter and meat, foodstuffs
removed from rationing included
margarine, lard, shortening and
cocking and salad oils
The action was announced today
by Secretary of Agriculture Clinton
P. Anderson at a news conference. He
said there is an abundant supply of
meats. including poultry.

}.

MICHIGAN MEN Get your PEP and SPIRIT
for the IIOMECOMING GAME , . . at the
BER VAULT
303 North Ifith Ave. Phone 84
Open: 10:00 A.M. to 1I0:00 P.M. every day
Saturday: 8:00 A.M. to 11 :00 P.M.
BEER (Kcg or Case) - WINE - MIXERS

IT

_ _ _ _ _
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7wte

200

BURRR, PATTJEWRSON & AULD COMPANY
I 1AI TEIRNIT Y. jE WLERS A T MICfIIGA N

1209 S. UNIVLUaSITY

RuTh ANN OAKI.S, M r.

i

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SHEER

GOOD FITTING
IN NEW FALL SHADES

- . ,

I

BLOUSES

"Holding the World Together" will
be the sermon topic of Dr. Leonard A.
Parr at 10:45 a.m. tomorrow at the
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.
The Congregational Disciples Guild
will meet at 5 p.m. tomorrow in the
assembly room of the church for a
cost supper and lecture by Rev. Owen
Geer of the Dearborn Community
Church. His topic is "Developing
Christian Leadership Through Wor-
ship." Evelyn Pease will lead the con-
cluding devotional service.
Former pastor of the METHODIST
CHURCH, Bishop Charles W. Bra-
shares and Mrs. Brashares, of Des
Moines, Ia., will be guests at a Wes-
ley Foundation dinner today. Dr.
Brashares' sermon topic at the church
tomorrow will be "Adventures."
He will speak also at the Wesleyan
Guild meeting at 6 p.m. tomorrow
in the Guild Lounge on "Mightier
Than the Atomic Bomb." A discus-
sion, supper and fellowship hour
honoring students from Iowa will
conclude the evening.
"The Inner World" will be Dr. W.
P. Lemon's subject at 10:45 a.m. to-
morrow in the PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH.
The Westminster Guild will meet
at 5 p.m. tomorrow in Ifhe church for
a discussion of "China Today."
Speakers will be Mrs. I. S. Lauten-
stager, Robert Richardson and Lein
Haiq Chiao. Mcnibems of the Chinese
Christian Fellowship Group will be
guests.
Holy Communion will be offered at
8 am. tumorrow in SiT. ANDREWS
EPISCOPAL CI(i U RH. Morning
prayer and sermon at 11 a.m. will be
conducted by Dr. Henry Lewis, pas-
tor.
The Canturbury Club of the Epis-
copal Church will meet at 6 p.m. to-
morrow in the Student Center for
dinner and a talk by Dean Alice
Lloyd on "Students in the Commun-
ity."
hit1'lr (Ordered Poles
licath, rhls -Reveal
NUJERNBERG, Germany. Nov. 23-
(!')-Adolf Hitler told his generals 10
days before the invasion of Poland
that he had given orders "to kill
without mercy all the men, women
and children of the Polish race or
language," American prosecutors dis-
closed at the war crimes trials today.

Mass will be said at 8, 10, and 11:30
a.m. tomorrow in ST. MARY'S STU-
DENT CHAPEL.
Vicar Clyde Showalter will preach
a sermon entitled "Facing the Rec-
ord" at services beginning at 10:30
a.m. tomorrow in the ZION LUTH-
ERAN CHURCH.
Open house will be held from 2 to
4 p.m. tomorrow at the new Luth-
eran Student Center, 1304 Hill St.
"One Humanity" is the subject for
the sermon t be preached by Dr.
Edward H. Redman at 11 a.m. to-
tomorrow in the U NITARIAN
CHURCH.
The student group of the Unitarian
Church will meet at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Lane Hall for a discussion
of "Peacetime Military Conscrip-
tion," led by Frank Sutton and Dr.
Redman.

Il

Dress & Sport

Styles.

CLASSIFIED ADVElirTISING

Vou need only to fill out the form
and drop in a mailbox.

JEWELRY

Neckline and

Tie Neck.

Sizes 30 to 38.

WANTED
WANTED: Second-hand camera in
good condition. $15-$25.00. Contact
Fred Ullman, 420 S. 5th Ave. 8367.
WANTED: Sewing, repairing, refit-
ting or the making up of new ma-
terial. Miss Livingston, 315 S. Divi-
sion. 2nd floor front.
WANTED: Two boys without one
o'clock are wanted to work for
lunch and dinner. Call 2-2547.
WANTED MEN'S CLOTHING-A
better price paid for men's used
clothing. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St.
HELP WANTED
MEN AND WOMEN on part-time
basis as orderlies and nurses' aides
at University Hospital. Apply at
hospital Personnel office. Room
1022.
STUDENT KITCHEN HELP-dinners
only, no Sundays. Mrs. Zimmer, 915
Oakland. Phone 22868.
PART TIME WORK for students who
have had experience pressing. Ex-
cellent pay. Apply in person. Gold-
man Bros. Cleaners. 214 So. State
St.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold watch lost in Angell
Hall. Reward. Call Kathleen Wat-
son, 8891.

TRETYOUR VISITING GUESTS

LOST: Mack binder type noteboo
Finder please returnto Waterman
Gym or Ulrichs. Cont ais 46 seine.
ster notes.
LOST: Small gold signet ring bear
ing initials H.A.B. Cal Harriet Bo
den, 8930. Reward.
- _-- -- _ -

330 SouTH STATE . ,, 101 SOUTH MAIN
-. ____ ._______________ .

Give your out-ofiown guests a [reat
tho will make them remember Ann

_
_ ._._

Ann Arbor always.

Call 4241 and re-,

Ii
.fi r .} . , 4 .'.
C .,. -'-_ .
t C
.9-.. -

SMARTEST

serve to have a delicious dinner after
the homnecomin game.

HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theater Bldg.

II

'JI, le'

-illl

1 ;) , I1 ASTF IU RON STRLEET

PHO N E 4241

C~cassnC

r
4
,;, , _
A *
l
ti;
=1=

on COMMODORE Records
at the Radio & Record Shop
You'll find a complete selection of collectors' items,
such as "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday. . 10-inch
green labels, 75c . . . 10-inch red labels, $1.00. .
12-inch red labels, $1.50. Come in and hear them!

MAGAZINE
Specjl
Student Rate
2,67 for 8 months

BILLIE HOLIDAY
CHU BERRY
BEN WEBSTER

JESS STACY
COLEMAN HAWKINS
MUGGSY SPANIER

BUD FREEMAN TRIO I I

111!

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