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November 17, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-17

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PAGE St K

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1945

-- - ~---------------- ----.--- I U -

Dentistry S(
#c
Is Treating 4
About 500 patients are presently
having work done at the general den-
tal clinic in the School of Dentistry
and speciaized cinics at the W. K.
Kellogg Foundation Institute.
The clinics offer free dental ser-
vice to students and anyone else
wh'ose work they can take care of.
Dec. 5 Ballong
ToAName Union
Vice .Presidents
Two Are Required To
Fill Board of Directors
Two Union vice-presidents are to
be selected in the Dec. 5 all-campus
election.
These vice-presidents will assume
positions on the Union Board of Di-
rectors, the body which has complete
supervisory power over the campus
men's club. The Board of Directors
is composed of six faculty members
and six student representatives.
L. S. & A. To Choose One
The literary college will select one
vice-president while thehfollowing
combined schools will choose the
other: the architecture college, the
music school, the business adminis-
tration school, the forestry school,
the ' pharmacology college and the
public health school.
The Board of Directors meets at
regular intervals to determine Union
policy and has the power to make
rules and regulations governing Un-
ion elections. The president and the
secretary, student officers of the Un-
ion, are chosen by a select body of
directors, three faculty directors and
three student directors.
Union Serves as Center
Aiding the Board of Directors, the
finance activities, house and ap-
pointments committees are directly
responsible to the Board.
The Union provides meeting places
for student and alumni organizations,
has recreational facilities for Michi-
gan men, offers room accomodations
for Union members and furnishes in-
expensive cafeteria service.
Petitions for the offices must be
submitted to the Men's Judiciary
Council before Nov. 24.

hool Clinic
Over 500

The only charges involved are those
for materials used.
2,500 Persons Registered
Last term 2,500 persons were regis-
tered at the clinics to have work done
in 14 departments. Close to another
1,500 persons were examined but could
not be taken care of because of the
nature of the work they needed or
the distance of their residences from
Ann Arbor. Of the 500 listed this
term, 400 are new patients and 100
are having work started last term
finished.
Refresher Courses for Graduates
Graduate students and dentists tak-
ing refresher courses, specialization
work or masters degrees take care of
patients at the Kellogg Foundation
clinics. Work at the general clinic
in the dental school is done by upper
class dental students. All work is
supervised and checked by professors
of the dental school faculty.
Courses for Veteran Dentists
Three refresher courses at which
specialized dental work is done are
under way. now. These include root
canal surgery, minor oral surgery,
and complete denture prosthesis.
The courses are designed primarily
for dentists who have left the armed
forces and are preparing to re-enter
civilian practice. There are 13, 14
and 9 dentists, respectively, enrolled
in each of the above courses.
Seven more refresher courses are
scheduled to be conducted this term.
Array Discloses Its
New Release Plan
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10-(1)-The
soldier with a big family will be eligi-
ble to get out' of the army after De-
cember 1, regardless of his point
score.
Men with three or more dependent
children under 18 years of age will
be eligible for release. Length of serv-
ice doesn't matter. Previously 12
points were allowed for each such
child up to a maximum of three.
The new point score for enlisted
men will be 55, instead of the pres-
ent 60.
In addition, a soldier with four
years of honorable service can ask
for discharge regardless of his age.
Victory Bonds-To Have
and To Hold

IFC Compiles
Directory on
U' Fraternities
Distributioi Scheduled
For Early Next Week
A fraternity directory, prepared by
the Interfraternity Council, will be
distributed at the beginning of next
week, said Fred Matthaei, newly elect-
ed IFC president.
Edited during the summer term by
William Crick, IFC secretary, the di-
rectory summarizes campus frater-
nity conditions. Pictures of all fra-
ternity houses are included as well as
rushing information.
The directories will be distributed
to fraternity presidents and will be
presented to all rushees next seme-
ster.
A third rushing list is in the process
of preparation and will be ready for
distribution next week. Students on
the first rushing list may be pledged
after Wednesday and those on the
second list after Thursday.
Graduate Given
Legion ofMerit
Brigadier General John Brandon
Franks, Kansas, '13, Michigan, '17,
of the Quartermasters Corps, has
been awarded the Legion of Merit for
commendable service as Deputy Chief
Quartermaster, European Theatre of
operations.
The award was given for his active
participation and frequent counsel in
which he made each individual feel
a sense of pride in seeing that his task
was well done.
Big Three Plan Meeting
MOSCOW, Nov. 16-(A')-Diplo-
matic sources reported tonight that
preliminary discussions were believed
under way for another meeting of
President Truman, Generalissimo
Stalin and Prime Minister Attlee, as
a means of solving current deadlocks
on high policy.

Yes Sir, Butt We
Didn't Know, Sir'
Military training, apparently,
has had an insidious effect on the
youth of America.
In the living room of a campus
dormitory last week, the house-
mother came upon two sailors,
smoking. She hesitated, explained
the dormitory's smoking rules, and
suggested that they take their
cigarettes out to the sunporch.
Whereupon the sailors replied,
in the best of Navy tradition:
"Oh, yes, sir. All right, sir."
It is reported that the house-
mother laughed.
It is reported that the sailors
blushed.
I-M Building
Open Fridays
To Vets, Wives
The IM building and its facilities
are availableFtodveterans and their
wives every Friday from .7:30 to 10
p. m., according to Earl Riskey, asso-
ciate supervisor in physical educa-
tion.
Badminton, volley ball and swim-
ming were most popular at the ini-
tial meeting last Friday. The IM
building, open every night for all
male students and facultyhmembers,
now will be limited on Friday nights
to veterans and their wives until
the regular attendance is determined.
Michigan Lady Chef
Receives GI Award
WASHINGTON, Nov. 16-(P)-Re-
gardless of what the GI's think of
the Army's menus, the woman who
prepared them today received the
highest honor the army gives to civil-
ians - the Exceptional Civilian
award.
Winner of the award was Miss
Mary I. Barber of Battle Creek,
Mich., food consultant to the Secre-
tary of War.

Students Should
Claim Unsold
Textbooks Now
Unsold books left with the Student
Book Exchange which are not claimed
by their owners by Wednesday after-
noon, will be disposed of as the execu-
tive board sees fit.
The unsold texts are being distrib-
uted from 10 a. m. to noon today and
from 3 to 5 p. m. weekdays until next
Wednesday at Lane Hall. Claimants
should bring their book receipts
when they call for their books.
At a meeting Tuesday evening the
members of the Exchange voted the
executive board power to dispose of
remaining books at their discretion.
Depending on the nature of the books,
some will be turned over to the stu-
dent lending library and some will be
contributed to drives now being con-
ducted for books to send abroad.
JGP To Start
Danice Classes
Registration for social dancing
classes sponsored by JGP and coach-
ed by professional instructors will be
held from 3 to 5 p. m. Monday and
Tuesday, and from 7 to 8 p. m., Mon-
day, in the Union and League, Ann
Lippincott, project chairman, an-
nounced today.
Classes will be held from 7 to 8
p. m. for beginners, and from 8 to 9
p. m. for intermediates beginning
Thursday, Nov. 29. Special classes,
requested by Chinese students, will be
offered from 7:30 to 8:30 p. in. Nov.
28. These classes, especiallydesigned
to introduce the foreign students to
American customs, will employ uni-
versity hostesses.
Mosher Hall Will Hold
Open House After Game
Mosher Hall will give an open house
featuring the " 'T' formation," danc-
ing, and refreshments, after the Pur-
due game today.

STASSEN DONS CIVVIES-Former Governor of Minnesota Harold
Stassen packs his Naval uniform after changing to civilian attire.
Stassen, who left his governor's position to enlist in the Navy in 1943,
was released at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill.
OAK LEAF CLUSTER:
'Buck' D awson Wins Award
For Service in Belgium

Lt. William 'Buck' Dawson, '43, who
left the University in October of '42,
has been awarded the Oak Leaf Clus-
ter to his Bronze Star by the 'All
American' Division in the German
capitol.
Dawson, who is with the Headquart-
ers 82nd Airborne Division, was given
the award for heroic conduct during'
21 hours of duty Jan. 28 and 29 near
Herresbach, Belgium. He voluntarily
offered his services to accompany ele-
ments of the Division Reconnaissance
Patrol on the latter's first foot patrol
in deep snow.
During the 21 hours his skill and
knowledge of snow patrolling guided
the platoon through the dangerous'

and hazardous routes. His group
surprised an enemy road block, kill-
ing one German and taking several
prisoners. Dawson's group forced the
withdrawal of the numerically super-
ior enemy force under intense fire.
Previously awarded the Bronze Star
Medal for meritorious service in the
Airborne invasion of Holland at the
Nijmegan Bridge in Holland, Daw-
son has received "The Military Order
of William," the Belgian Fourragere
to the Croix de Gere, the Presidential
citation, and the Infantry Combat
Badge.
He wears the European Theatre
Ribbon with five campaign stars, the
Bronze Invasion Arrowhead, and the
Glider Badge with combat star.

Iiitill

S

I

Graduating in February, June, or October - '46

y U_ _ _ UT
Your Pictures for the 1946 I IGANAENSIAN
Are Due JAN UA RY 10th
YOU MUST:
o BUY A SENIOR PICTURE COUPON at the 'Ensian
office or. from the 'Ensian representative who will
visit your residence soon.
o MAKE OUT AN ACTIVITIES CARD provided
by the 'Ensian for the "Senior Activities" list.
* HAVE YOUR PICTURE WITH THE FOLLOWING
SPECIFICATIONS AT THE 'ENSIAN OFFICE BY
JANUARY 10th:
(1) Size 3"x 51
(2) Glossy Print - Light Background

COME 10 (t
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron Guild House, 502 East Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Ruth Copps, Student Counsellor
10:00 A.M.: Student Class meets in the Guild
House to study the Gospel of John.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
C. H. Loucks, "Gratitude."
5:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Mr. Harvey
C. Jackson, Detroit Social Worker speaks on
"The White Problem."
6:00 P.M.: Cost supper and fellowship hour.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw.
W.P. Lemon and James Van Pernis, Ministers.
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School Intermediate, Senior
and Adult Departments.
10:20 A.M.: Junior Department.
10:45 A. M.: Nursery, Beginner and Primary
Departments.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship: "God and a
Day" sermon by Dr. Lemon.
5:00 P.M.: Westminster Guild program on
"Meet the Millions Emerging to Freedom."
Prof. Hartley H. Bartlett, Guest Adviser. Mrs.
Esson M. Gale and Korean guests. Supper
follows the meeting.
7:00 P.M.: Tuxis Society Candlelight Thanks-
giving Service with Mrs. Harris C. Malan as
Advisor.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Ministers-James Brett Kenna and Robert H.
Jongeward.
Music--Hardin A. Van Deursen, director.
Student Director-Kathleen M. Davis.
10:40 A. M.: Morning Worship Service.
10:40 A. M.: Church School for children through
the sixth grade.
6:00 P. M.:Wesleyan Guild Meeting
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Director of Student Work, H. L. Pickerill
Assistant Director of Student Work,
Miss Bobbie Simonton
Director of Music, Howard Farrar
Organist, Howard R. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Junior and Intermediate Depart-
ments
10:45 A.M.: Primary and Kindergarten
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. This will be a
Thanksgiving service, Dr. Parr preaching on
the subject, "THE BIRTHDAY OF SUR-
PRISAL".
5:00 P.M.: Congregational-Disciples Guild in
the Congregational Assembly Room. Cost sup-
per. Dr. Frank Littell speaks on "Develop-
ment of Christian Character and Leadership
through Study." Worship service by Harold
Osgood, former president of Guild.
5:30 P.M.: Ariston League in Pilgrim Hall.
Supper, followed by devotions led by Beverly
Teasdale. Miss Rachel Shields will speak on
the "Technique of Worship."
ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC STUDENT
CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Sunday Masses: 8, 10 and 11:30 o'clock.
Daily Masses: 6:30, 7 and 8 o'clock.
Novena Devotions Wednesday"evening, 7:30.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate.
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion
9:45 A.M.: 8th, 9th, and 10th grade class, Page
Hall.
11:00 A.M.: Junior Church
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by Dr.
Lewis.
6:00 P.M.: H-Square Club, Page Hall
6:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club, Student Center.
Following supper, Dean Joseph A. Bursley will
lead the discussion.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer
8:30 P.M.: Adult Confirmation Class, Tatlock
Hall.
During the Week:
Tuesday, 10:00 A.M.: Holy Communion, War
Shrine.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by breakfast at Student Center. Res-
ervations, 5790)
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.M.: Open House, Student
Center.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
For all National Lutheran Council Students
Zion Lutheran Church-
E. Washington St. and S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service
Trinity Lutheran Church-
E. William St. and S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service
Lutheran Student Association-
309 E. Washington St.
5:00 P.M.: Program: Mr. John Anderson, Pres.
and Miss Jean Gringle, Vice-Pres. will speak
on the meaning and purposes of LSAA.
6:00 P.M.: Supper and fellowship hour.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30i A.M.: Sunday lesson sermon: "Mortals
and Immortals."
11:45 A. M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P. M.: Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 Wolverine Building, Washington at 4th,
which.is open daily except Sundays and holidays
from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Here the Bible and
Christian Science literature including all of Mrs.
Mary Baker Eddy's works may be read, borrowed
or purchased.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(Missouri Synod)
Saturday, 4:15-6:15: Open House after the game
Saturday, 8:00-12:00: Drop In Hours, Student
Hosts.
Sunday, 11:00 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon
by the Rev. R. W. Hahn of Chicago, Executive
Secretary of the Student Service Commission
of the Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod.)
Sunday, 5:00 P.M.: Supper Meeting of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club, with the Rev.
R. W. Hahn as speaker.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Stateand Huron Streets
Pria,r N_ Rpdmn_nTMinistepr

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