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November 10, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FkMAT,

gov. 10, 14

Miss Ma rtinson
To Give Talk
At Lane Hall
Speaker Will Explain
New Political Party
Mary Moore Martinson, of the
Detroit office of the Michigan Com-
monwealth Federation, will speak on
the Federation, newly developed po-
litical party, 12:15 p.m. tomorrow in
a luncheon meeting at Lane Hall
sponsored by the Student Religious
Association.
MissMartinson has been a leader
in the Rocky Mountain Student
Christian Movement and the Na-
tional Council of Methodist Youth.
The Commonwealth movement is
strongest in England and Canada,
and at present constitutes the chief
opposition party in four provinces in
Canada, SRA spokesmen said. At-
tracting liberal and labor groups, the
Federation's program is more popu-
lar control of the national economy
through cooperatives, land reform
and social ownership of the large
industrial "national" monopolies.
Tickets will be available to faculty
and students upon reservation made
by calling Lane Hall.
INVEST IN VICTORY
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

Sorority Plans
Open House for
U' Veterans
All veterans on campus have been
invited to attend an open house held
by Kappa Alpha Theta sorority after
the football game tomorrow, Laszlo
Hentenyi, president of the Veterans;
Organization announced today.
The invitation states, "We hope
that every veteran will come, and
that those who are married will feel
free to bring their wives, right after
the game Saturday." Doughnuts
and cider will be served.
"On behalf of the Veteran's Or-
ganization and all veterans on cam-
pus, I wish to extend my hearty
thanks to the members of Kappa
Alpha Theta for their kind invita-
tion," Hetenyi said, "and it is my
hope that all veterans on campus will
respond to this invitation."
The KAT house is at 1414 Wash-
tenaw Avenue, south of South Uni-
versity avenue.
Square Dance To Be Held
At Presbyterian Church
An old fashioned square dance will
be held after the pep rally today by
the Westminster Guild at the Pres-
byterian Church.
Howard Leibee will call the dan-
ces. During the evening cider and
doughnuts will be served.

U. S. PILOT AIDED FROM PLANE AFTER MANILA RAID--With
brakes and landing gear shot up on a sortie over Manila, Philippine
Islands, a Yank fighter pilot crash landed on a U. S. carrier. His
plane lost its tail and flight deck crewmen lifted the injured pilot
from the cockpit.
AEF MEN POLITE:
Officers Remain ';entlemuen,
By Self-Control, Congress Act

Szell To Direct
At Semester's
Second Concert
Cleveland Symphony
To Play Here Sunday
The Cleveland Orchestra, which
will play here at 7 p. m. Sunday at
Hill Auditorium for the.second Chor-
al Union Concert under the direction
of its guest conductor, George Szell,
is familiar to radio listeners on five
continents.
The Orchestra has presented net-
work broadcasts frequently in the
past, and last season, it presented a
series of twenty-seven broadcasts
which were carried over stations in
United States and Canada, and by
short-wave to Central and South Am-
erica, Africa, Europe, and the Paci-
fic war front.
Concert To Be Broadcast
Sunday night's concert will be
broadcast over a nation-wide and
short wave hook-up at 7 p. m. Ev-
eryone is asked to come on time,
since no one will be admitted after
the concert begins.
George Szell, who made his debut
as a conductor at the age of 11 in
Vienna, is a conductor of interna-
tional fame. Since his arrival in
the United States four years ago he
has appeared as guest conductor for
the orchestras of Boston, Chicago,
New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles,
Detroit, and at the Metropolitan Op-
era House.
Szell received his training under
Richard Strauss, when he served as
assistant conductor at the Royal Op-
era in Berlin. He was principal con-
ductor of the Court Theatre in Darm-
stadt and the Municipal Theatre in
Dusseldorf from 1921 to 1924. From
1924 to 1929 he was chief conductor
of the Berlin State Opera and of the
Berlin Broadcasting Symphony Or-
chestra. Simultaneously he was a
member of the faculty of the Hoch-
schule fur Musik in Berlin.
Has Conducted in Europe
He has also conducted the Prague
Philharmonic Orchestra, the Vienna
Philharmonic and Vienna Symphony,
the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the
London Philharmonic Symphony and
the BBC Orchestra.
Sunday's program is as follows:
Overture to "A Midsumer Night's
Dream" ........... . Mendelssohn
Symphony No. 6 in F major. .Beethoven
Symphony Metamorphosis of Themes by
Von Weber........ ....Hindemith
"Till Eulenspielgel's Merry Pranks,"
Opp. 28.................. ... Strauss
"No," said the northerner briefly.
The Third Division lieutenant got
up, pulled on his gloves, turned to
leave.
"Well," he said, smiling again. "I'll
see you in the spring." There was a
moment's pause, then both lieuten-
ants grinned at each other like offi-
cers and gentlemen.

Following upon a highly successful
talk by Prof. Newcomb two weeks
ago which drew a crowd of more
than 200, the second in a series of
fireside chats, conducted by Prof.
John W. Lederle of the political sci-
ence department on the topic,
"American Government, Reform or
Revolt?" will be held at 8:30 p.m.
today in the Hillel Foundation as-
sembly hall.
Prof. Lederle will discuss the ques-
tion of Congressional cooperation
with the President, a problem which
becomes increasingly important as
our. governmental system of checks
and balances threatens to bring na-
tional legislation to a stalemate.
After receiving his A.B., M.A. and
LL.B. at this University, Prof. Lederle
went to Brown U., where he taught
in the political science department
and served as an assistant dean. He

received his Ph.D. at the Providence,
R.I., University in 1942.
In his undergraduate years at
Michigan, Prof. Lederle was a mem-
ber of the varsity tennis team and
served for two years as president of
the Union executive council.
At the conclusion of the fireside
discussion, refreshments will be serv-
ed by Hillel senior hostesses Mrs.
Isaac Nagler, Mrs. Herman Kroter
and junior hostesses Betty Korash
and Carole Lieberman.
Students, servicemen and towns-
people are invited to attend.
Religious. Services To Be
Held at Foundation Chapel
Religious services conducted by A-
S Eugene Malitz and Sam Krohn.
'44D, will be held at 7:45 p.m. today
in the Hillel Foundation chapel.
The services, in Hebrew and Eng-
lish, are open to the public.

I

__ _ _ _

REFORM OR REVOLT?
Prof. Lederle To Discuss U.S.
Government at Hillel Today

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WITH THE AEF IN FRANCE, Nov.
4.---(Delayed) -(/P)- It's wonderful,
the self-control an act of Congress
sometimes instills in men.
Take the case of the two lieuten-
ants. Both were officers and gentle-
men. One was from the Army that
had fought its way up from the
south. The other was from an outfit
in the north.
They were very polite and courte-
ous as they sat in the French road-
side cafe: And at first their conver-
sation was quite friendly. Then the
lieutenant from the northern unit,
having discovered to which division
the lieutenant from the southern
outfit belonged, asked:
'Third . . . third. Oh yes, the
Third Division was in Italy quite a
while, wasn't it?"
The southern Army soldier care-
fully set down his glass.
"Yes," he replied slowly. "And
before that it was in Sicily. And
before that, it was in North Africa.
I understand the papers back home
gave it quite a play."
"They probably did," agreed the
lieutenant from the northsquite
pleaseantly, "but the British pa-
pers didn't mention much about
individual American divisions. You
see, we were in the U.K. (United
Kingdom) then, pretty busy train-
ing."
He offered the Third Division man
a cigarette.
Prof. Price to Play
AntiLems f on Carillon
Prof. Percival Price will give a
special carillon recital, featuring an-
thems of the United Nations, in
honor of the United Press Club of
Michigan meetings being held' here
at 4:45 p.m. today.
The Men's Glee Club under the
direction of Prof. David Mattern will
give .its first performance of the
season at the Press Club dinner
meeting to be held at 8 p.m. today in
the Union. The Glee Club will also
sing Michigan favorites at the inter-
mission of the homecoming dance to
be held tomorrow at the Union.

"Good thing, too. We really need-
ed that training. D-Day I came in
with the 29thhDivision.Guess you
heard about the rough time we had
on the beaches."
"Sorry," thessouthern soldier smil-
ed politely but shook his head, "we
had just taken Rome a couple of
days before. You know how it goes."
He smiled again. The ;northerner
smiled back, then tried a new tack.
"Understand you had it pretty easy
coming in on the Riviera beaches.
Didn't hit much resistance, did you?"
"No," said the southern Army
man promptly, "it was nothing
like Sicily, and it damn sure wasn't
like Anzio. Then, warming to the
subject, he continued, "It wasn't
like Africa either, or those behind-
the-lines landings in Sicily."
The 29th Division boy knew when
to concede a point and try a new
serve.
"Anzio must have been rough, all
right," he agreed, "must have been
something like our hedgerow cam-
paign after the Normandy landings.
They almost cut us to pieces then."
"Yes," said the Third Division
doughboy, a faraway look in his
eyes, "it was like that for us at
Anzio.
"Of course," said the 29th Division
lieutenant, softly slipping in the
needle, "of course, we managed to
keep going, however."
The southern man stiffened.
With careful control, he got out his
cigarettes and lighted one. Finally
he spoke: "Yes, we've found it
easier, too, to keep an attack going
in spring and summer. Let's see .
you fellows haven't had a winter's.
campaign yet. Have you?"
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