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November 05, 1944 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

fIUNDAY, NOV. 5, 1944

THE MIfCHIAN- AIlY

PA ESEVEN

i! .1 1 8 l..l 1 - '

olverines Register RecordotalAainst

Penn.

Michigan State
Toppled from
Unbeaten Ranks
Missouri Comes Back
To Whip Spartans 13-7
By The Associated Press
COLUMBIA, MO., NOV. 4-Mis-
souri University Tigers spoiled the
unbeaten and untied football record
of Michigan State here this after-
noon by charging to two second half
touchdowns after they had trailed
the Spartans 7-0 at the half. The
final score was Michigan State 7,
Missouri 13.
Sparked by Robert Hopkins, sub-
stituting for the Tigers' star runner,
Bill Dellastatious, the Missourians
scored without losing the ball after
the second half kick off. , Paul Col-
lins, quarterback, went over for the
first Tiger touchdown to culminate a
60 yard drive. Jim Kekeris, 272
pound Missouri tackle, missed his
placement for the extra point.
Undismayed at failing to tie the
score, the Tigers continued to out-
play the Spartans and early in the
fourth quarter drove to the deciding
touchdown. A pass intercepted by
Max Riley, Missouri fullback, set
the stage for the second drive which l
began on the Missouri 35 yard line.

MichiganBackfieldRuns
WildDuring First 1aIf
Chubb Tallies Twice as Derricotte, Lund,
Renner, Hilkene, Weisenberger Score Once

(Continued from Page 1)
cessful conversion the score read
34-0. A few seconds later the half
ended with Penn chalking uip its
initial first down of the game.
Initial Attack Halted
The Maize and Blue didn't take
long in announcing their intentions.
After the opening kickoff had been
lugged back to the 29-yard line,
Eugene Derricotte in two plays ad-
vanced the ball to the Red and Blue
49-yard line. The Wolverines were
then temporarily halted but on
fourth down Derricotte faded back
to pass and finding no one open ran
with beautiful blocking to the 36-
yard line for a first down. Derricotte,
Chubb, and Lund then alternated to
make it a first down on the Penn 23.
Chubb, who ran brilliantly all
afternoon, then broke loose on two
reverses and the ball was on the six-
yard line. The Michigan attack bog-
ged down at this point and Penn
took over. George Munger's outfit
punted out. of danger and Chubb
came roaring back with a 32-yard'
sizzling run to the eight-yard line.
Three plays moved the ball to the'

four-yard line and on fourth down
Chubb skirted four precious yards
around right end for the first score
of the game. Ponsetto's kicl was
good, making the score 7-0 after 11
minutes of the first period had
elapsed.
Trio Leads Attack
A fumble put Penn in the hole
after the next kickoff and they were
compelled to punt from the end zone.
Chubb returned the kick six yards
to the Penn 35, and with Derricotte,
Lund, and Chubb assuming the
offensive burden, Michigan made it
a first down on the Penn 19 as the
gun sounded the end of the first
quarter.
Then Lund crashed center for two
and Derricotte on-anotherreverse
skipped to the four-yard line. Der- I
ricotte then bolted off left tackle
for the second score and Ponsetto
again tallied the extra point.
Subs Play
During the second half, Michigan's
second and third stringers did most
of the playing except for a brief
respite in the fourth quarter when
the regulars marched 75 yards in 12f
plays for the Wolverines' final score.
A 24-yard run by Chubb around
right end scored the touchdown.
Ponsetto's educated toe again clicked
for another extra point.
Penn's first score came in the
third period, with the Quakers mar-
ching 67 yards in 11 plays. Ed Law-
less' try for the extra point was
unsuccessful. Penn's second tally
resulted in the longest run of the
game, a 62-yard jaunt by Anthony
Minisi, the 17-year-old 190 pound
freshman. Lawless' kick was wide.
Penn Passes Click
The Quakers' last score was set up
by Andy Gordon, when he inter-
cepted Yerges' pass on the Penn 35-
yard stripe. Two passes, Gordon to
Helman, covered 60 yards and on
two plays Engelking tallied from the
five-yard line. Seidenburger's try for
the extra point split the uprights.
Final statistics gave the Wolver-
ines an overwhelming edge in the
rushing. department as they piled up
376 yards to Penn's 161. The Quak-
ers had a slight advantage over the
aerial route with 136 yards on eight
completions in 14 attempts to Michi-
gan's 89 on five successful heaves
out of 12 tries.

Canadiens Edge
1 utedWing s
In Tight Game
By The Associated Press
MONTREAL, Nov. 4.-Toe Blake's
goal with eight minutes to go broke
up a tight hockey game here tonight
and gave the Montreal Canadiens a
3-2 victory over Detroit's Red Wings
in the first meeting of the two teams
this season,
A sell-out crowd of more than
12,000 saw the Canadiens go into a
two-goal lead in the first period,
only to have the Wings get one back
just before the period ended and tie
it up while Canadiens were playing
two men short in the second. That
set the, stage for Blake's game-win-
ner in the closely-fought third.
Although Blake got the tie-break-
ing goal, much of the credit for the
win went to goalie Bill Durnan who
was sensational'in the net. He played
a big part in handing the Wings
their first defeat of the season.
Maurice Richard started the scor-
ing with a backhander that slid
under Conny Dion from close in.
Dutch Hiller added another

THE NEW "BIG THREE"-One veteran, Eugene D erricotte, (left) and two. newcomers, Don Lund
(center) and Ralph Chubb, (right) spark the running attack of the revamped Wolverine backfield
which yesterday ran wild against Penn at Franklin Field. Strangely enough, Derricotte, the "veteran,"
is a freshman and the youngest of the trio.
FRESHM AN1,FIRE WO .RKS:
Gen Dr coteShatterfs Traditiont

W NANTED
MALE STUDENTS
for
PART-TIME HELP

C f
Keep ahead of
Santa and the rush
by Shopping
Early
For the largest selection of
CHRISTMAS CARDS visits
cis&
723 North University

By BILL MULLENDORE 1
Four years ago followers of West-1
ern Conference football would havel
scoffed at the notion that any Big
Ten team would be using freshmen
in its starting lineup, but along came
Pearl Harbor and relaxed eligibility
rules and with these innovations
came the realization that first-year
men can stand the pace of the veter-
ans.
First there was the redoubtable
Bob (Hunchy) Hoernschemeyer of
Indiana fame who as a yearling led
the nation's backs in total offense.
and was selected on more than one
All-American eleven. This season
has produced three more topnotch
freshman halfbacks in the persons
of Illinois' great Buddy Young, Wis-
consin's sensational 17-year old Jug
Girard and Michigan's own Eugene
Derricotte, who bids fair to becomes
a Wolverine great in his own right
with a couple of years of experience.
Starred Against Purdue
This is not to say that the flashy
Negro speedster is not doing all right
this fall. Derricotte has occupied a
starting role in every game and has
been continually improving with each
outing, rising to his peak perform-
ance in last week's tilt with Pur-
due in which he gained 101 yards
from scrimmage and completed three
passes in as many attempts besides
being a power on defense from his
safety man position.
Derricotte's efforts have been
somewhat overshadowed by the pres-
ence of a pair of pretty fair backs
in the Wolverine secondary, fullback
Bob Wiese and wingback Bob Nuss-
baumer, both veterans and both fine
ball carriers. But with the transfer
of both these men to other Navy and
Marine bases Derricotte should be-
BOx Score

come the leading cog in Coach H. O. is just another bit of evidence to the
Crisler's offensive, fact that freshmen will do as well as
After watching hie n theanyone in big time collegiate football.
five games of the season most Wol -___________ _____
verine grid observers have little doubt
as to his ability to take over this
new, vital role. Derricotte is fast,
shifty, a better than average for-
ward passer, and tremendously pow-
erful despite his 5 ft. 9 in. 170 pound
frame. His terrific leg drive enables
him to knife through the smallest
openings, and his speed allows him
to make the most of his opportuni-
ties in an open field.
Justified Crisier's Faith
Derricotte hails from Defiance,
Ohio, where he led his high school
team to one undefeated season and
received a nomination for All-State
honors despite the presence of a gal-
axy of backfield stars from larger
schools, including the almost legend-
ary Massilon High. His high school
coach was instrumental in getting
Derricotte and his teammate, Char-
les Wahl, to the Michigan campus, a
bit of aid for which the Wolverine
coaches are duly grateful.

Inquire after 3
PRETZEL BELL'

:00 P.M.
TAVERN

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-

As a freshman on the squad at
Michigan Derricotte worked his way
up from the ranks to establish him-
self as the outstanding tailback can-
didate available, and Crisler's faith
in assigning an inexperienced new-
comer to a starting berth was imme-
diately justified as Derricotte gave
highly creditable performances when-
ever. called upon.
Has "Football Sense"
Thus it appears that for a first-
year man Derricotte has done more
than all right for himself, and it
seems more than likely that he will
continue to do so. He has the requi-
site natural ability, a fighting heart,
and that almost indefinable some-
thing known as "football sense"
which is, essentially, the ability to do
the right thing at the right time.
So, with Wiese and Nussbaumer
gone it is a pretty safe bet that the
name of Eugene Derricotte will loom
ever larger on the Wolverine football
horizon. Future Michigan opponents
are more than likely to see too much
of this enterprising young man who

t ; ,1 1

I

Extra long, extra wide, 100%
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NEW

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Due to abnormal conditions in
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MICHIGAN
Hilkene
Lazetich
Burg
Watts
Sickels
Bauman
Renner
Ponsetto
Derricotte
Chubb
Lund
MICHIGAN

Pos.
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB
. ..7

PENN
Helman
Savitsky
Stengel
Mostertz
Hedberg
Stickel
Rosenthal
Lawless
Sica
Minisi
Edenborn
0 7-41

. - --------Clip Here And Mail To A U.-M. Man In The Armed Forces-.-.-.-.
SERVICE
EDITION
ANN ARBOR, MICH SUNDAY, NOV. 5, 1944

HUTZEL'S
ANN ARBOR

27

and supply

of books we were

I

unable to accommodate you as
we like but stocks are arriving
all the time.

PENN..........0 0 6 13-19
MICHIGAN SCORING: Touch-
downs-Chubb 2, Derricotte, Renner,
Hilkene, Weisenburger. Points afterf
touchdown-Ponsetto 5.1
PENN SCORING: Touchdowns-
Edenborn, Minisi, Engleking. Points
after touchdown-Seidenberger.
PENN SUBSTITUTES: Ends-Mc-
Nulty, Meadows. Tackles-Musser.
Guards-Kurtz, Pepicelli, Dickerson,
Boyle. Center-Messick, Rossel, Sei-
denberger. Backs- Gordon, Opel,
Green, Martin. Southard, Engleking,
Frazier.
MICHIGAN SUBSTITUTES: Ends
- Greer, Honigsbaum, Friehofer.a
Tackles-Leroux, Brielmaier, Fate.
Guards-Swift, Oeming, Chiavarini,
Mehaffey, Mantho. Center-Lintol,
Wahl. Backs-Culligan, Weisenber-
ger, Yerges, Bentz, Wenzlau, Peter- 1
son, Babyak.

WOMEN will outnumber
the men on campus this
fall by a ratio of 3-1. This
enrollment of 4,324 women
contributes largely to the
9.4 percent increase over
1943. Not only has civilian
male enrollment dropped
to 1,799 but military train-
ees have been severely cut.
In the Army 1150 men are
enrolled as compared with
2,300 last year and the
cutting of Navy men by
250 from last years 1,250
account for more of the
loss. The all time high for
the University, 12,000, has
been cut almost by half to
6.103 students.
* *a*
THE ONLY increase to
be noted along the line is
a 200 percent growth in the
University branch of the

the group and offers one
hour credit per terrm for
work done.
HELEN TRAUBEL pro-
claimed "The All-American
First Lady of the Opera"
opened the Choral Union
concert series last night in
Hill Auditorium. Miss
Traubel who is now the
principal star of the Met-
ropolitan Wagnerian wing
included in her program
selections by Beethoven,
Schubert, Strauss, and
,Mendelssohn. It is the
hope of "the first lady of
the Metropolitan Opera,"
at some time in the not-
too-distant future to be
able to sing all of her re-
cital programs entirely in
English for, she said, "I
am an American singing to
Americans, and because in

THE HON. FRANCIS B.
Sayre, United States High
Commissioner to the Phil-
lippines at the time of the
Japanese invasion, will
open the Oratorical Asso-
ciation series Nov. 16 in
Hill Auditorium. Sayre
declared in Manila that
the Philippines would be
granted their indepen-
dence in 1946.
THE HONOR system of
examinations will be prac-
tically eliminated from the
larger freshman and soph-
omore engineering classes
this semester it was de-
cided by the Executive
Committee of the engineer-
ing faculty, after a student
petition suggesting the ac-

Q

HELEN TRAUBEL

.I

AIAI

THE LAST two days of
the War Chest Campaign
to raise $23,000 on campus

WELCOME

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