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February 04, 1945 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE -MICWHIG-,AN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 1945

LOOKING AHEAD:
Michigan Files FM Applications

i

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 - (A") - A At present, only two commercial
steadily increasing number of ap- FM stations, WLOU and WENA in
plications on file with the Federal Detroit, are on the air regularly.'
Communications Commission for fre- There are no non-commercial educa-
quency Modulation (FM) and tele- tional FM or television stations in
vision construction permits in Michi- the state.
gan indicates a new era in radio Pending FCC approval of indivi-
development after the war. dual applications and release of ma-
Applications have been filed to terials for civilian use. non com-
build 19 new commercial FM sta- mercial educational FM have been l
tions, three non-commercial educa- received from Ann Arbor, regents of
tional FM and six television stations the University of Michigan; Detroit,
in the state when materials are again City of Detroit Board of Education;
available for civilian radio construe- Kalamazoo, Western Michigan Col-
tion. 'lege of Education.
tiAvaiLab e at
1-41I
/A/,
f BU R R PAT TE RSON& AU LD CO-,
FRATERNITY JEWELERS AT MICHIGAN
1209 SOUTH UNIVERSITY KUTHi ANN OAKLS, Mgr┬░.
/ 7

Congress Spars
Over Wallace.
RFC Is Divorced from
Commerce Department
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3-(P)-Ad-
ministration and opposition forcesl
box-scoring this congressional week'
reached widely varying totals, with
contrasting claims of profit from the
maneuvering over manpower, Henry
Wallace and government lending
agencies..
Administrationists added it up like
this:
Score: 1-1
1. A major legislative victory in
the House through passage of an
administration-patterned compulsory
manpower act.
2. The Senate compromise on the
former vice president, which Wallace
supporters called a political victory in
that it bolstered his chances of be-
coming Secretary of Commerce.
But the opposition figured they had
a credit balance on the week, out of
Senate action to divorce the Recon-
struction Finance Corporation and
other financial agencies from the
commerce department before voting
on Wallace.
Meanwhile an apparent move by
numerous Southern Democrats to join
forces with house Republicans on the
Wallace issue posed a new though in-
direct threat to the nomination.
Southerners May Join GOPsters
Rep. Cox (D.-Ga.) said there were
indications that 85 per cent of the
Southerners would go along with
the Republicans in their drive to ex-
pand the Senate-passed RFC bill to
prevent President Roosevelt from
dealing out any other financial agen-
cies to Wallace as Secretary of Com-
merce.

FUTURE EDUCATION:
Vet Plans Are Evolved

BENTON HARBOR, Mich., Feb. 3-
(I)-The Board of Education of this
southwestern Michigan city in coop-
eration with Sidney C. Mitchell, sup-
erintendent of schools, has evolved
a definite program for educational
assistance to returning war veterans.
The setup has been worked out in
detail and Mitchell hopes to see its
adoption, in principle, throughout
Michigan.
"The boys have already begun to
come back from the war fronts, and
they will continue to return in steadily
increasing numbers," Mitchell said.
"Some of them are sure to look to the
schools for guidance in shaping their
plans for readjustment to civil life
and, if those plans call for further
training, they will expect us to pro-
vide it.
"As these young men come to us,'
we may classify them, at first, into
two general categories-those who
have definite plans for the future and

those who have not. It is to be ex-
pected that a considerable number of
young men, after being entirely out,
of touch with all social and economic
developments on the home front will
come home quite at a loss to know
which way to turn. During their ab-
sence their jobs may have been filled
by others who, in many instances,
will be reluctant to give them up. New
inventions and new processes of man-
ufacture will have rendered some oc-
cupations obsolete while creating new
ones for which workers will need
special training.
Discussing types of training which
he believes will be urgently needed,
Mitchell has proposed a Veterans' In-
stitute established under Board of
Education auspices and operated as a
part of the school systems for two
years. Existing school facilities would
be used in late afternoons and eve-
nings.

I
t

JAMES PLATE '45 ROBERT LINDSAY, NROTC
. . . new Union president . . . new Union secretary
_- k

Editor's Note: Contributions to Michigan
Men at War should be addressed to The
Military Editor, The Michigan Daily, Stu-
dent Publications Building, 420 Maynard.
The Air Medal has been awarded to
First Lieutenant ROBERT A. PLATT,
who received his B. A. at this Uni-
versity, for "meritorious achieve-
ment" while participating in bomb-
ing missions against German military
and industrial targets.
Lt. Platt, pilot of a B-17 Flying
Fortress, is serving with the 385th
Bombardment Group of the Eighth
'Air Force (England).
Holding the Air Medal with an
Oak Leaf Cluster, Sgt. JAMES R.
HA r7FT % ia i unner in a B-24

Barracks, Mo. At Michigan, he was
a member of Sigma Zeta.
Recently commissioned a second
lieutenant in commencement exer-
cises held at Lubbock Army Air
Field, Tex., THEODORE V. LIN-
ABURY, will soon be assigned to an
overseas combat theater.
While attending the University
from 1937-40, Lt. Linabury was a
member of the Varsity Glee Club
and Kappa Delta Rho fraternity.
Open House.,.
(Continued from Page 5)

That Good
Grey Flannel
in Your Life

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,.,
- +.
.

41

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UNIVERSITY CONETBN

til~ , aera guluiilu
Liberator group, 15th Air Force remcdelling of what was formerly
(Italy), has recently flown his 25th known as Harris Hall.
mission over enemy territory. Local USO a Community Conductive
Entering the AAF in the fall of After remodelling operations, which
1942, Sgt. Hazel received training Included painting and furnishing,
raiing the Club was officially opened and
in radio at Sioux Falls, S. D., and d dh e dw o ffDc.aly94pend Ar-
in aerial gunnery at Harlington,{ dedicated on Dec. 11, 1943. Ann Ar-
Te i ybor's USO is run as a community
Tex. conductive with the Community Fund
. financing one half of the funds ne-
HAWORTH F. HOCH, now station- cessary and the National USO finan-
ed with a training cadre at Camp cing the rest of the maintenance
Wolters, Tex., has recently been pro- fund.
moted to the rank of corporal. Six national organizations have
Corp. Haworth, a graduate of the joined forces to operate their ser-
University in the Class of 1930, enter- vices to the armed forces as the
ed the Army last March at Jefferson United Service Organization.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

,
. 1

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ANNUFL MID-WINTER CONCERT
Guest Conductors*
DR. EDWIN FRANKO GOLDMAN
AMERICA'S FOREMOST BAND CONDUCTOR
MORTON GOULD
NOTED COMPOSER-CONDUCTOR OR RADIO FAME
WILLIAM SCHUMAN
OUTSTANDING CONTEMPORARY COMPOSER
AT 4:15 P.M. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH
DILL AUDITORIUM

NO ADMISSION CHARGE

Ne''cc

I I

~1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

*

CIVi2 fl TTA YV A iOA k'

ANN ?RBOR, MICH.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1945

an outclassed Wisconsin
five by a 50-39 total Fri-
day four points short of the
highest score of the season
for the Wolverine quintet.
The Badgers led for a short
time at only one point in
the contest, early in the
first half. From then on,
the Michigan team began
to hit the basket from all
over the floor, displaying
its smoothest attack of the
season. High scorer of the
evening was Wisconsin's
forward Des Smith, with
14 points. Smith was close-
ly followed by Keith Hard-
er, Wolverine forward, with
13, and by Badger star Ray
Patterson and Michigan
guard Don Lindquist, who
both registered 11 points.
This win put the Wolver-
ines back at the .500 mark
in Conference games.
MICHIGAN MATMEN
defeated Ohio State in a
meet held after the basket-
ball game by an over-
whelming 25-5 margin.
Theonly falls of the eve-
ning were registered by
George Darrow, 155 -
n .mar x'h1ninnpd Buck..

Gophers in a 10-0 shut-
out, were never in the lead,
and did not score until
midway in the second per-
iod. Both goals were cred-
ited to wing Tled Greer.
Wolverine gdefenseman
Robert Henderson was in-
jured in the waning min-
utes of the game when the
blade of Michigan goalie
Dick Mixer's skate ripped a
gash in his scalp.
THE CAGERS, however
were not as successful last
night at Iowa City as on
Friday, taking a 50-37
drubbing from the same
Iowa squad which had
beaten them by two points
in an earlier contest. The
Hawks were in command
throughout the contest
and the score at halftime
was 26-15. Herbert Wil-
kinson, Iowa guard, con-
tributed 16 points to his
team's total, while the sec-
ond highest scorer of the
evening was Wolverine for-
ward John Mullaney, with
13. This loss once more
dropped the cagers below
the .500 mark.
* * *

(Continued from Page 4)
Comning Events '
The Women's Research Club will
meet Monday, Feb. 5, in the West1
Conference Room of Rackham Build-
ing, at 8:00 p. m. Dr. Norma L.
Pearson will talk on "The Whys of
Cotton Fiber Research."
Spanish Play Tryouts: Tryouts for
Zaragueta, this year's play to be pres-
ented by La Sociedad Hispanica, will
take place on Monday and TuesdayI
Feb. 5 and 6 in Romance Languages,f
room 408 from 4 to 5 p. m. The play
is to be presented on April 17 anda
18 at the Lydia Mendelssohn and
rehearsals are to begin the first week
in March.
Junior Research Club: The Febru-
ary meeting-of the Junior Research
Club will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 6,
in the Amphitheatre of the Horace
H. Rackhai School of Graduate Stu-
dies at 7:30 p. m. Program: "A Sur-,
vey of Antibiotic Agents," J. E.
Kempf, Dept. of Bacteriology; "Ex-
ploring For Quinine in the Andes,"
W. C. Steere, Dept. of Botany.
The First Meeting of the Russian
Club will be held Monday at 8:30 p.m.
in the International Center. All stu-
dents of Russian and other people
Sinterested in Rus sian culture are in-
vited to attend. Plans for future club
meetings will be formulated at this
time.
Sigma Rho Tau: The last meeting
of the term for the Stump Speakers'
Society of Sigma Rho Tau will be
held Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in
Rms. 319-323 of the Union. Parlia-
mentary Law and Society elections
will be discussed. Circles will debate
on compulsory military conscription
and the new topic: Who should sup-
port non-profit extensions of public
utility services? Project and Hall of
Fame Speeches will be given.
I- -
The Fine Arts Club invites all stu-
dents interested in Fine Arts to a
meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 7, from
4:00 to 5:30 in Rm. D, Alumni Me-
morial Hall, Travel movies about
- England, France, and Egypt will be
shown, after which a short business
meeting will be held.
z - -
Biological Chemistry Seminar will!

meet on Feb. 7 at 4:15 p.m. in 319
West Medical Building. Doctor Rich-
ard J. Porter, Associate Professor of
Protozoology in the Department of
Tropical Diseases, of the School of
Public Health, will speak on "Biology
of Malarial Parasites in Relation to
Chemotherapy." All interested are
invited.
"The Skin of Our Teeth," comedy
by Thornton Wilder, will be pre-
sented by Play Production of the De-
partment of Speech Wednesday
through Saturday nights at 8:30 in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets will be placed on sale tomor-
row in the theatre box office, box of-
fice hours being 10-1, 2-5 Monday
and Tuesday and 10-8:30 the balance
of the week.
Congregational - Disciples Sunday
Evening Hour. 5:00 p.m. at the Me-
morial Christian Church. Following
the supper, Mr. Frank Littell will
speak on 'Religious Discipline for So-
cial Action." Ed Vanderveen will lead
the closing Worship Service.

"Indispensable"-classic standby of
specialy line quality men's wear flannel (Carlye
is known for it!) Piped and collared in snowy
white pique ... and nip-tucked over the hips for
that close-fitting line. Big shimmery ocean pearl
buttons-and lots of them. Grey or beige.
Junior Sizes $25
A Michigan Fashion Institution for 75 Years

7Z

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mmmw

St~d4 cn hedcwnz 4ed
"SADEm:D OLE [fi
............(.

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SKATERS ALL-Joseph Bree of the Grand Street
Boys Club, New York; Marion Hanley of Staten
Island, and Herman Van Putten of the Preakness
Farmers Skating club of Paterson, N. J., competed
at Newburgh, N. Y., skating meet.
wrslr Th--- cmea

wrestler. The fall came at
8:31.
YESTERDAY AFTER-

pound. match, between
Hoosier Hugh Wilson and
George Darrow, created the
most interest, as Wilson

L;

Id9

5495
Perfect companions for a non.
stop schedule ... low-heelers
you'll walk in, work in, live in

I"KEEP AHEAD I

.:

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