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January 21, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JAN. 21, 1945 TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

Ohio

a gers

Han Michigan

Wolverines Drop Third
Straight Conference Tilt{
Buckeyes Lead Throughout Contest as Risen
Sinks High Score of 11 Points; Kell Cages 10
By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS, 0., Jan. 20-Ohio State never was behind tonight as it
chalked up its third basketball victory in four Western Conference starts
at the expense of Michigan's Wolverines, 61 to 47.
The only time the Wolverines were on even terms with Ohio State was
in the opening minutes when the count was deadlocked at two-all. The
Wolverines stayed close, however, until Jack Dugger poured in two quick
one-handers to make the count 14-7.
From there the Buck lead varied between five and ten points until
half-time, when the Ohio Staters were on the long end of a 31-22 score.
The Bucks were leading 36 to 25,

Michigan Hockey Team Beats Sarnia
To Score First Win of 1945 Seasoin

Jug e paden
Is Open Leader
Byron Nelson Trails
By One Stroke Margin
TUCSON, Ariz., Jan. 20..(/).-A
cold wind sent golf scores soaring
today, but Harold (Jug) McSnaden.
Sanford, Me., duplicated his opening
round three-under-par 67 to g) into
the leadership of the $5,000 Tucson
Open at the half way mark with a
36 hole total 134.
The. former Philadelphian held a
one stroke margin over his golfing
buddy, Byron Nelson, Toledo, 0.,
Bruce Coltart, Atlantic City, N.J.,
and Joe Zarhardt, Norristown, Pa..
who led the first round yesterday
with a 65. Their 36 hole totals were
135.
Today's best rounds, played in 50-
degree temperatures, were 67's by
McSpaden, Sam Byrd, Detroit, and
Willie Goggin, White Plains, N.Y.
t RECOD S

when Michigan lost its brawny cen-
ter, Don Lund, early in the second!
half, and that was a death blow to
Michigan's hopes.
From that point, Ohio State
romped into a 45-30 lead before
Walter Kell, Bruce Hilkene, and
Bob Geahan connected for three
rapid-fire field goals to cut the
margin to nine points. With six
and a half minutes to go, Ohio
State had only a 47-40 advantage
but at that point Don Grate, Rod
Caudill, and Jimmy Sims hit the
target and coach Harold Olsen sent
in reserves to finish the contest.

Greer Notches All
Wolverine's Goals
By JERRY LEWIS
Holding the lead throughout the
game, Michigan's hockey team de-
feated a strong Sarnia squad, 4-3,
for its initial victory of the season.
Captain Ted Greer was the man
of the hour last night, as he was
responsible for all of the Wolverines'
tallies. Greer made three of his
goals unassisted. His first came late
in the first stanza, when he out-skat-
ed two men .to tally. Near the end
of the period he made his one and
only assisted goal of' the night. Herb"
Upton and Carl Sulentich did some
nice setting up with their excellent
passes and Greer went in for the
kill.
In 6:15 of the second stanza
Greer made his second unassisted
tally when he outmaneuvered
three men to score. Greer's third
unassisted goal was made in the
third period when the Sarnia

squad had only five men on the same stanza, Lee Perry made a long
ice. shot which went past Mixer almost
Sarnia scored for the first time in unnoticed. Sarnia's third and last
the second period on Jim Butler's score was made in the closing min-
excellent shot which sailed by goalie utes of the tilt, when Stewart Cou-
Dick Mixer. Near the end of the sins made an unassisted tally.

Chicken Soup
ROAST BEEF or LAMB CHOPS . . . $1.25
T-BONE STEAK ... $1.50
Potatoes - Corn, Peas or Broccoli
Fruited Cottage Choose - Home Made Rolls - Dessert

The victory was Ohio State's
mnd over Michigan this season.
first was an overtime affair at
Arbor.

MiCHGAN
Geahan i, f
M~ulaney, f
Harder, If
fierce, '
Lund, c
Hilkene, c
Lindquist, g
Kell, g
Gregor, g-
Norris, g'
TOTALS
OHIO STATE
Grate, f
hugger, f
Caudill ,f
Snyder, f
Risen, c
Pfeifer, e
Donham, c
Hu ton, g
Amling, g
Sims, g
Jacobs, g
Davis, g
McFadden, g
TOTALS

G
n
2
2
4
0
0

0
0
2
0

PF
0
0
1
0
4
3
1
0

see -
The
Ann
II
TP
0
4
4
10
0
0

BERNIE'S TACK: Back on the job at the University of Minnesota after
a tour of duty in the Marines, Bernie Bierman teaches the proper
stance as drill opened in the field house. Dr. George Hauser, who
filled in during Bierman's absence was an interested spectator.
WHAT A RECORD!
After 40 Seasons Cardinals

i

WV POINT WITH PRIDE
; to our

20 7 11 47
G F PF TP
2 3 0 7
4 1 2 9
3 0 2 6
1 0 1 2
5 1 2 11
3 1 1 7
1 0 0 2
3 2 3 8
2 1 1 5
1 0 0 2
0 2 0 2
0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
25 11 13 61

AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

many i
NEW YORK, Jan. 19--P)--"Why I
don't you write a piece about the
Cardinals being above the .500 mark
for the first time in more than 40
years," Bill Brandt suggested, and as
it was the first time we were aware
of that, and it would give us a
chance to get away from stories
about the F-F-F-F's for a day, we'll
do it.
Considering the fortunes of the St.
Louis National League club in recent
years it's almost unbelievable that,
until early last year, their over-all
percentage of games won and lost
since 1901 was less than .500.
When the Cards finished the 1943
season their victory percentage was
.4998, and their first three games in
1944, which they won, brought the
mark above .500. At the end of last
season they had boosted their aver-
age to .504.
It was a long, tough climb for the
Red Birds, who lately have been win-
ning pennants with such ease they
get little credit and less sympathy.
It took eight pennants and the feat
of being the only National League
team to win more than 100 games
three straight years to reach their
present .504 mark.
They started out on the wrong foot
in 1900 by losing 75 while winning
only 65, but they brought their two-
year average above .500 the next
year by winning 76 while losing 64.
Then came the famine, and,
among other disastrous seasons, there
were two straight years when they
lost more than 100 games each year.
In fact, in only three of the first
17 years did they finish above .500

tsn .5u00vMarK
and there were 12 straight years
they finished in the second division.
And it's the Cardinals we're talk-
ing about, not the Phils.
Anyway, considering the agonies
the St. Louis fans must have suffered
through those early years they
should not be begrudged what satis-
faction they can get out of the cur-
rent status of their team. After all,
a club whose victory average is .504
for 44 years can't be accused of be-
ing a glutton, except for punishment.
Bill Brandt, who doesn't care how
often you mention the Cardinals, or
any other club as long as it is in
the National League, the National
League being his ration book in his
role of publicity man, also has an-
other item concerning the St. Louis
team.
This one isn't too surprising. It
just points out the fact the Cards
were one of the two National League
teams to hit more home runs on
their home lot than their opponents
did last season.
Of 53 home runs hit at Sports-
man's Park ,the Cards hit 39, or .736
per cent of them. Boston accounted
for 61 of 95 hit at Braves Field for
a .537 mark, but all the other cluks
were out-hit in the home run de-
partment by the visitors. The Reds
made the poorest showing at home,
making only 14 of the 37 circuit
drives at Crosley Field.
As might be expected, considering
the telephone booth dimensions, the
Polo Grounds were the happy-hunt-
ing grounds for stickmen, seeing 161
balls go into or over the stands. The
Giants got only 75 of them, which isj
understandable. They weren't bat-
ting against their own pitchers.

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. . . . . . . Clip Here And Mail To A U.-M. Man In The Armed Forces . - . -
SERVICE . t . Wt .%

.

EDITION

EVENING
STARS
New net, crepe,
and jersey formals
in flattering colors
of white, blue, pink,
black, and yellow.

...4 ..Ir or a s e
PEPLUM-
DRESS
Of Cohama Jersey in a
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can count on Cohaina's
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or how high the mercury
mounts! Count on the
luxuriously soft shirring
to work wonders for your
figure, the pretty peplum

iowntown 3/ore

ANN ARBOR, MICH

KAMPUS KAPERS II
will be held Jan. 28 in Hill
Auditorium. This all cam-
pus show which was first
put on last November is
now being called a "real
part of the campus" and
will again bring to the
students.a variety of en-
tertainment featuring all
student talent. The Un-
ion, the League, and the
Daily have again combin-
ed their efforts to make
Kampus Kapers a living
part of University life and
these organizations are
sponsoring this second
production. The heads of
these organizations have
indicated that "no effort
will be spared to make this
a great show." This pro-
duction will include the
campus favorites, Billy
Layton, his band and Judy
Ward;. the campus comedy
king, Doe Fielding; the
acrobatic dancing of Bev.
Wittan and Dot Murzek;
the Women's Glee Club;
and other outstanding
acts. Net Proceeds will
be donated to the USO
and the Bomber Scholar-

16*95
to
35.00

I l II~~

III

r4X

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