100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, .Nt

mp .

I I

Ma"

NOTED SPEAKER:
U.S. Commissioner Sayre
To Open Oratorical Series

_
: :
: z

Speaking on "Our Relations with
the Philippines," the Hon. Francis B.
Sayre, United States High Commis-
sioner to the Philppines at the time
of the Japanese invasion, will open
the Oratorical Association series Nov.
16 in Hill Auditorium.
Sayre, who succeeded Paul V. Mc-
Nutt as High Commissioner to the
Islands in June, 1939, has maintained
a consistently friendly attitude to-
ward Philippine independence. In
contrast to McNutt, who insisted on
retention of the Islands, Sayre de-
clared in Manila that the Philippines
Student Choir
Reorganizes
Tryouts Accepted May
Receive Music Credit
The University Choir which per-
formed at numerous functions in
1940 is reorganizing for both men
and women students and servicemen
who wish to participate in the sing-
ing of a varied repertory for their
own pleasure.
Under the direction of Prof. Hardin
Van Deursen, the Choir will be
offered as Ensemble 49 in the School
of Music, with or without credit (1
hour). Latin motets, English madri-
gals, modern' arrangements of folk
tunes, spirituals and hymns will be
performed by the group.
Students who would like to try out
for the Choir should contact Prof.
Van Deursen in the School of Music.
Rehearsals will be held at 4 p.m.
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thurs-
days in Rm. 212, of Hill Auditorium.
Ann Arbor Bird
Club Is Formed
Representatives of the Michigan
Audubon Society and the Detroit
Bird Club, presided over by Joseph J.
Hickey, met in Ann Arbor October
14 to form an Ann Arbor Bird Club.
The organization will endeavor to
arouse greater knowledge and ap-
preciation of birds'among the people
of Ann Arbor and will serve .s a
gathering place for all those inter-
ested in ornithology.

would be granted their independence
in 1946.
Before taking office, Sayre gained
familiarity with the Islands as chair-
man of the Joint Preparatory Com-
mittee on Philippine Affairs and as
a member, since 1934, of the body
planning new economic ties between
the United States and the proposed
independent Philippines.
Wary of the possibility that the
Filipinos may be steered toward dic-
tatorship, Sayre has insisted that in
the years preceding independence
they must learn how a democracy
should be run.
In 1933, President Roosevelt ap-
pointed him Assistant Secretary of
State in which position he worked
directly under Secretary of State
Hull in the formulation of the recent
reciprocal trade treaties. His earlier
diplomatic experience was gained as
adviser in foreign affairs to ' the
Siamese government.
A member of the faculty of the
Harvard Law School for more than
twenty years, Sayre served also as
assistant to the president of Williams
Couege.
Sayre has written a number of
books on law and international
affairs, the most recent being "The
Way Forward" (1939), "America
Must Act" (1935) and "Cases on the
Law of Admiralty" (1929).
Pollock..
(Continuedi from Page 1)
migratory workers, wives with
theirasoldier husband, and our
large displaced population, will all
serve to out down the total vote.
If the ballots total less than 48,-
000,000 Pollock thinks Dewey will be
the winner. In past elections the
upper economic one-fourth and the
older groups have been the mainstay
of the G.O.P. Also, a larger percen-
tage of those groups always vote;
conversely, the lower economic third
and the young folks largely favor
Roosevelt.
If these last two named groups
push the total vote past that 48,000,-
000 mark, then Roosevelt will be the
likely victor, according to the pro-
fessor. The soldier vote, he points
out, is unpredictable and may upset
all calculations. He also added that
it is votes which count and not
registrations.

G.O.P. Ahead
In Michigan
Legislatures
Reapportionment May
Give Democrats Some
Detroit Aid in House
- By The Associated Press
LANSING, Nov. 1.-Both Republi-
cans and Democrats concede that the
G.O.P. will retain its control of both
the State House of Representatives
and Senate in Tuesday's election.
The Democrats look for a small
increase in their numerical strength
in the house, principally due to re-
apportionment of legislative seats
giving Detroit-a stronghold of their
party-21 instead of 17 seats. Neither
party expects much change in the
senate partisan lineup.
Last Election Score
In the last election, 74 Republicans
and 26 Democrats were elected to the
House, while 25 Republicans and
seven Democrats were elected to the
Senate.
A grand jury investigation of char-
ges of legislative graft, which has
caused the imprisonment and sen-
tence to imprisonment of 12 legis-
lators, has heightened interest in the
campaign.
Ten house members convicted of
taking graft in a conspiracy have
lost their seats. Two others await
trial, one on a charge of perjury and
the other on a graft warrant.
Reapportionment of Seats
Reapportionment of legislative
seats has raised the house member-
ship of Detroit, a Democratic strong-
hold, from 17 to 21 members, and
the Republicans have not seriously
challenged the Democratic claim
that all of 21 will be Democrats.
The Deorai high command
says it will also elect a Democrat
from Macomb County, one from
Oakland County, may pick up a cou-
ple of additional Upper Peninsula
seats, and one from St. Clair County
because of dissension among Repub-
licans in the latter county over a
primary election contest.
The Senate was not reapportioned.
Truman 'Hits' Dewey
PARKERSBURG, W. VA., NOV. 1
-(VP)-Gov. Thomas E. Dewey was
described tonight by Senator Harry
S. Truman, the Democratic vice pres-
idential candidate, as a "political
faker" and "scoffer."
In an address prepared for a Dem-
ocratic rally, Truman reviewed the
work of the Senate War Investigat-
ing committee,

Changes Made
In Department
Of Psychology
Due to the limited staff in the
psychology department this sem-
ester, the following changes have
been made in order to cope with
the situation:
The first meeting of Psychology
31 will be the lecture, Friday at
11 a.m. or 1 p.m.
Lecture 1. MF, 11, N.S. Aud., Dr.
Thornton
Lecture II. MF, 1, N.S. Aud., Dr.
Thornton Discussion sections:
Sec. 1: M, 9; 3126 N.S. Morton
Sec. 2: Tu, 9; 1121 N.S. Morton
Sec. 3: M, 10; 3126 N.S. Feldman
Sec. 4: Tu, 10; 3126 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 5: Tu, 11; 1121 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 6: W, 11; 1121 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 7: Tu, 1; 1121 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 8: F, 9; 3126 N.S. Morton
Sec. 9: Th, 9; 1121 N.S. Morton
Sec. 10: F, 10; 3126 N.S. Feldman
Sec. 11: Th,10; 3126 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 12: Th,11; 1121 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 13: S, 11; 1121-N.S. Thornton
Sec. 14: Th, 1; 3126 N.S. Thornton
Sec. 15: Tu, 9; 3126 N.S. Feldman
Eligibility Cards
Are Available
Eligibility cards may be secured
immediately by students desiring to
participate in extra-curricular activ-
ities at the Office of the Dean of
Students, Rm. 2, University Hall, by
presentation of a blueprint of their
academic record.
A student must have an eligibility
card before he will be permitted to
participate in a public activity. First-
semester freshmendwill not be con-
sidered eligible and an uppeclass-
man must have had at least a C
average in order to receive his eligi-
bility card. Athletic activities are
not included in this rule.
Alumni Meet in Philly

The General Library, located in
the center of the campus, is open to
all students of the University.
Built in 1917-19 at a cost of $615,-
000, the library houses two large
study halls and a collection of books
ranging from reference works to
modern detective thrillers.
01,0Oi meierence BooxsF
On the open shelves of the Main
Reading Room are about 10,000 ref-
erence books; the Periodical Reading
Room contains about 1,400 currently
received periodicals; and the Medical
Reading Room serves the needs of
students in Medicine and Nursing.
Other books may be obtained at the
Delivery Desk on the second floor or
the First Floor Study Hall.
During the regular academic year,
the General Library is open from
8 a.m. to 10 p.m. on week days. The
Study Halls and Departmental Col-
legiate Libraries are open mornings,
afternoons and evenings, but close
Announce Election Fete
The first campus election night
party to be announced will be held
by the University Club at 7 p.m.,
Tuesday, at the Union. The film,
"Michigan on the March," will be
,shown.
" A NEW SHAMPOO
" A QUICK SHAMPOO
* A DRY SHAMPOO
NO SOAP * NO RINSING
NO DRYING

at the lunch and dinner hours. Dur-
ing the Fall and Spring Terms the
General Library will be open to read-
ers from 2 to 9 p.m. Sundays.
Library Services
The library serves all teaching
units of the University except the
Law School, and is maintained by
the Board of Regents, which provides
for services, supplies and purchases
of textbooks and periodicals.
The books are classified according
to a modified Dewey decimal system,
and whenever possible Library of
Congress catalog cards are obtained
for the library card catalogs.
Approximately 25,000 volumes are
added annually through purchase,
gift and exchange.

HUB OF CAMPUS:

I

Library Open to All Students;
Offers Large Variety of Books

r, .11

Concert Series
Begins Today
Prof. Price To Feature
Russian Folk-Songs
Prof. Percival Price, University
carillonneur, will inaugurate a series
of Thursday evening concerts with a
program of Russian folk songs at 7
p.m. today.
Students who have enjoyed prev-
ious Christmas and Good Friday
carillon recitals will be interested to
know that Prof. Price will continue
these programs until Christmas.
Selections from Mozart's "Mar-
riage of Figaro" will highlight the
first half of the program. Prof. Price
will also play such Russian folk
songs as "Dark Eyes," "Kalinska,"
"Partisans' Song," "Stillness," and
"Happy Heart."

iia seater o/ ooI Jai le
-
Some restaurants are known for a special dish,
others for atmosphere and still others quality. The
Allenel has acquired all three. We are glad to
serve you.
712 E A.eL44e
126 East Huron ... Phone 4241

Kl

The Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in
Philadelphia will be the Michigan
Alumni headquarters all day Satur-
day when Michigan plays University
of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia.
After the dinner planned for the
evening the film "Michigan on the
March" will be shown, T. Hawley
Tapping, secretary of the Michigan
Alumni Association, announced to-
day.

30

SHAMPOOS
WITH MITTEN
P=Tax

$1

MA RS HA LL'S
235 South State
Next to State Theatre

I

i

I I I -- '. It

.--nj

USED

E

FOR ALL SCHOOLS

AND

DEPARTMENTS

6,

SUPPLIES

STATIONERY

I

LAMPS

FOUNTAIN PENS

DRAWING EQUIPMENT

NOTEBOOKS

Everything for the Student

.

r -

I

l

r

316 S. State St.

316 S. State St.

A'"_

L

m

.

® - u

M~ L U U II

I I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan