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January 07, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JAN. 7, 1945

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

PACE SEVEN

Swimmers

Dr. Up Opening

Meet

To

Great

Lakes

Bluejackets Take Thirdj
Straight from - ichigan

- ---------

Sailors Take Five Firsts, Five Seconds,
Three Thirds for Winning 44-Point Total

(Continued from Page 1)
Michigan's squad last year, took the
lead in the 200-yard free style and
remained out in front until he cross-
ed the finish line. However, a close
battle was being fought for' second
place between Church and Pylkas.
The Wolverine merman headed his
opponent until the last lap, when
Pylkas forged ahead in a burst of
speed to nose out Church.
Both first and second places went
to Great Lakes in the fancy diving
competition. Carl Quaintance per-
formed admirably on the spring-
board to nose out his teammate, Ned

Diefendorf, former Big Ten champ
and member of last year's Wolver-
ine swimming team.
Church, Fries Place ,
The Maize and Blue's stellar short
distance free stylers, Fries and
Church, churned easily to the one
and two slots in the 100-yard free
style, while the third place berth
went to Navy man Dowell:
In the 150-yard backstroke event,
Jack Munson, a Maize and Blue
natator, lead throughout the entire
tilt, but lost the lead in the last lap
to Bluejacket contestant Everett Tur-
Pulakus, Zimmerman, of Michigan,
and Pylkas finished in that order in
the 440-yard free style clash. The
400-yard relay, final event of the
evening, went to the Wolverine team
of Breen, Church, Fries, and Pulford.

SKI
THE OCCASION

w ilnin ngSumnnaries

]I

300 MEDLEY RELAY-Won by
Michigan (Pulford, backstroke, Kess-
ler, breastroke, Church, freestyle)
Time 3:03.6.
50 YARD FREESTYLE-Won by
Fries (Mlichigan); second, Craiger
(Great Lakes); third, Bridges (Mich-
igan). Time :24.2.
220 YARD FREESTYLE-Won by
Pulakus (Great Lakes); second, Py-
Ikas (Great Lakes); third, Church
(Michigan). Time 2:23.6.
DIVING--Won by Quaintance
(Great Lakes); second, Diefendorf
(Great Lakes); third, Lopez, (Michi-
gan).
100 YARD FREESTYLE-Won by
Fries '(Michigan); second, Church
(Michigan); third, Dowell (Great
Lakes). Time :54.6.
150 .YARD BACKSTROKE-Won
by Turdey (Great Lakes); second,
Munson (Michigan); third, Pulkman
(Great Lakes). Time 1:44.7.
200 YARD BREASTSTROKE-
Won by Mondro (Great Lakes); sec-
ond, Kessler (Michigan); third,
Mowen (Great Lakes). Time 2:35.
440 YARD FRlSESTYLE-Won by
Pulakus (Great Lakes); second,
Zimmerman (Michigan); third, Pyl-
kas (Great Lakes). Time 5:21.
400 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY-
Won by Michigan (Breen, Church,
Fries, Pulford). Time.3:31.4.

DEFEATED-Pictured is the Great Lakes medley relay swimming
team which lost to a similar group from Michigan last night. From
top down: Achilled Pulakos, Ray Mondro, Everett Turley.

Boilermakers
Surprise Ohio
State, 37-36
Last-Minute Basket by
Purdue Provides Upset
By The Associated Press
LAFAYETTE, Ind., Jan. 6-Pur-
due's underdog Boilermakers over-
came an early 10-3 deficit to edge out
Ohio State in their Western Confer
ence basketball opener tonight, 37-3.
The Boilermakers treated nearly
7,000 fans to a brilliant defensive
display as they handed the defending
champions their first Conference set-
back in two games this season. Un-
able to match the tremendous height
of the visitors, Purdue played a cau
tious possession wgne throughout,
holding the bal six minutes ,without
a shot just before the half ended.
Guard Charlie Haag was the main
cog in the stout Purdue defense. Haag
concentrated on Don Orate, the
Buckeye key man, and held him
pointless. Only Arnold (Stilts) Risen
and Paul Huston were able to count
more than a half dozen points for
Ohio State.
A field goal by Haag gave Purdue
its first lead at 18-16, and Coach
Ward Lambert's charges stalled out
the remainder of the first period,
which ended, Purdue 22, Ohio State
19.
Ohio State regained the lead in the
early stages of the second half, 23-
22, on Risen's rebounds and eventu-
ally enjoyed a 27-23 margin. Purdue
forged back in front at 29 to 27, how-
ever, and withstood the Buckeyes'
closing rush.
With two minutes remaining, Jack
Dugger gave Ohio State a 36-35 lead
on a free throw, but Anderson con-
nected from the field and Purdue held
out to the end.
Iowa Beats Gophers,
41-34, in Big Ten Tilt
IOWA CITY, Ia., Jan. 6-(P)-The
undefeated Iowa basketball team, its
high-scoring attack almost com-
pletely absent, opened its bid for the
Western Conference championship
tonight with a 41-34 victory over
Minnesota's surprisingly tough Goph-
ers.
Rarely did the Iowa fast break go
into high gear and the Hawks were
far short of their 73-point average
in six previous games. They collect-
ed 17 points on free throws
Great Lakes Defeats
Iish Quintet, 59-58
GREAT LAKES, Ill., Jan. 6.-
()-Two long baskets by Mickey
McGuire in the last three minutes
gave the Great Lakes Bluejackets a
59-58 victory over Notre Dame's bas-
ketball team here tonight.
McGuire's two counters came after
Johnny Dee, who tallied 25 points
for the Irish, had put Great Lakes
behind, 57-55. Then the former St.
John's of Brooklyn star tossed in the
two goals while Dee added a free
throw for Notre Dame.
The Bluejackets, who took a 10-4'
lead early in the game, were ahead
most of the way, and held a 30-27
margin at the half.

RED LIGHT'S ON:

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to jump to the forefront.
par 71 for a total of 142.

He blew it on the ,back nine, finished with a

Ray, Jug Tied for Lead
By The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 6-Slim Ray Mangrum, Los Angeles pro out
of the big time golf tournament picture of late, and defending champion
Harold McSpaden, were deadlocked for first place at the end of 36 holes
today in the 72-hole Los Angeles Open. They posted two round totals
of 140, two under par at the halfway mark.
Crack shot Sam Snpad, tournament favorite, had an excellent chance

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$14 795

& I P,
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SAW ItED

' r V f
t\ Y
NI

Sports Hard Hit by President's
Demand for Universal ServiceI

AU-Wool P0d5
from

4

WASHINGTON, Jan. 6-President
Franklin D. Roosevqlt today appeared
to have put the blinkers on the green
light he issued to sports three years
ago this month.
As a result of the President's ad-
dress to Congress urging the enact-
ment of a legislation making all
4-F's available in "whatever capa-
city is best for the war effort," sports
faces a dreary future.
Three years ago President Roose-
velt, in a letter to the late Kenesaw

a

Plain Color
.Gabrardiles
from1 810.95

PRE-INVENTORY
DRESSES ...
Regular $25.00 ... Now $15.00
Regular $14.95. . . Now $8.00
Requlor $8.95 . . Now $4.00

s

_. , ,

Mountain Landis, Baseball's High
Commissioner, expressed his personal
rather than official point of view,
urging the national game to continue
in wartime.
Roosevelt's latest stand, however,
might spell the end of professional
sports for the duration, if Congress!
adopts his suggestion. In full accord
with War Mobilization Director James
F. Byrnes, whose request last Dec.
23 that all 4-F's be re-examined for
duty either in the armed forces or
in war jobs, Roosevelt's wish paral-
lels War Secretary Newton D. Baker's
"work or fight" order of 1918 which,
disrupted baseball in the waning days
of World War I.
Baseball Hardest Hit
Only three days ago, Jan. 3, horse
and dog tracks were closed at the
request of Byrnes.
Pro sports are studded with many.
men rejected by the Army and Navy
doctors for physical disabilities. Ma-£
jor League Baseball, with 281 of its
400 players in 4-F, will be hardest
hit. With spring training only two
months off, club owners are at a loss
as to what to do.g
Football, with more than half its
personnel either in 4-F or Army and
Navy dischargees, is not too alarmed
as it has several added months in
which to mark time and hope for
something to happen as the year
lengthens to change the picture.
Golf and boxing will also be hard
hit, with such link stars as Byron
Nelson and Jug McSpaden, two of
the leading money winners of 1944,
in the 4-F group. Boxers either in
4-F or discharged from the services
include Willie Pep; featherweight
champion, Sugar Ray Robinson,
Bobby Ruffin, Jimmy Bivins and Ken
Overlin.
College Athletics, supported in the
main by pre-draft age athletes and
Naval Trainees would be affected to
some degree by the loss of 4-F's or
the Universal Service Act, asked by
the President.
Bamnbino Voted Top
Athlete In 25 Years
NEW HAVEN, Conn. Jan. 6.-
P)-Members of the Connecticut
Sports Writers Alliance today an-
nounced they had voted Babe Ruth
the outstanding athlete in the past
quarter of a century and would pre-
sent him with a plaque at their gold
key award dinner here Jan. 29.
Dan Parker, sports editor of the.
New York Daily Mirror; Ken Strong,
former All-America football star and
the New York Giants' ace punting
specialist during the past pro grid-
iron campaign; and Pete Foley, vet-
eran Connecticut scholastic athletic
coach, will receive the gold keys.
I v PE I ITR' :

S . . Clip Here And Mail To A U.-M. Man In The Armed Forces . - . . - - --
SERVICE
EDITION,
ANN ARBOt,.MICH SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 1945

2 N9N A
217 MA IN ST.. 9 NICKELS ARCADE

.with quaint
on shoulderand sleeve
ing for pixie prettiness!
bow ties in front. makes
Africano -Rayon Crepe
Sky Blue, Green Frost,

quilted flowers
... and soft shirr-
The self-fabric belt
your waist a wisp!
in Ice Pink, Summer
Lilac. Sizes 9 to 15.

SUITS...
Regular $45.00. . . Now $25.00
Regular $35.00... Now $20.00
COATS 100% Wool
(Some with Inner Lining)
Regular $50.00... Now $29.95
SWEATERS... 100% Wool
Regular $10.95. .. Now $5.00

All-Wool Cheeks
front rN
Whether you're working, at-
tending classes, or having a
casual date, you'll find the
skirt to fit the occasion at Cot-
tins. Skirts to change your
jackets into Suits . . . Skirts
to team with blouses for that
"Costume Look" . . . truly

JEWELRY - S
CQMPACTS .
Values upt
COLOGNES.
Re ular $1.

;ALE./a2Off
. .Now 79c
to $5.00,
. .By Angelus
50 ...Now,75c
P'A-1

RESULTS from the elec-
tion for V-Ball Committee
posts and the single posi-
tion available on the Board
in Control of Student Pub-
lications were announced
Friday after an all campus
election. Those represent-
ing the College of Engi-
neering will be William C.
McConnell, Dick Mixer,
and S. John Sorice. From
the College of Architecture
and. Design Jean Wick was
chosen and from the Col-
lege of Business Admini-
stration Morton Scholnick
was selected. The Lit
School will be represented
by Paul John, Doris Heid-
gen, David Loewenberg,
Alene Loeser, and Norma
Johnson. Mqnroe Fink will
hold the position on the
Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications.
EDWARD H. KRAUS,
dean of the University's
literary college, will be
awarded the Roebling
medal, highest mineralogi-
cal honor in the United

texts on various branches
of mineralogy and a 'rec-
ord of leadership in both
mineralogical and educa-
tional fields.
SHIP'S BALL planned
by and given for all local
naval personnel and their
guests, will be held Friday,
Jan. 19, at the I. M. Build-
ing. Bobby Sherwood who
is now playing at the ,Pan-
ther Room in Chicago will
provide the music for the
dance. General chairman
of the ball is Bob Bennett,
and he will be aided by a
staff of V-12 members. W.
C. McConnell and Frank
Lohman are co-chairmen
of the Decorations and
Building committee, and
they will be assisted by G.
C. Danch, T. G. Barnes and
J. F. Hackstadt. Publicity
is being arranged by Jim
Martin and his staff of T.
C. Smith, N. S. Talner, J.
W. Johnson, N. Z. Bern-
stein, R. M. Borrstein, and
A. B. McDonald. Howie
Joyce is in charge of 'ticket

NEW YEAR'S weekend
has come and gone and
everyone is settling down
to study until the time for
final examinations rolls
around. The weekend was
a big success with parties
at the Union and League
Saturday and Sunday
nights. As Ray Dixon in
his column, "On Second
Thought," put it, "On Sat-
urday students hollored
happy new year in Unioni-
son and on Sunday night
the same students sang a
chorus of Auld League
Syne."
THE ANNUAL Interna-
tional Ball which was held
Friday in the Rainbow
Room of the Union was at-
tended by students from
over 40 countries including
Latm-America, Europe and
the Orient. Students from
the United States were
guests at the affair. Bill
Layton and his orchestra
furnished music. Edward
Salgado, a prominent Fili-

wonder prescriptions for
'less costume changes.

end.
Sizes

10 to 20

~~~"0

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