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January 03, 1945 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-03

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S

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

",T)NESID Y, JAN. 3,

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LANDING SHIP, MATERNITY-An A. iericaa L T (nuig 8i, Lon) beccmu a Landing Ship, Ma-
ternity, for the time being as a Fiiino woman, M, f. i ) > frn bd at daughter
Juanita, who had been delivered by a Navy docr a ni L a upL ,; a a a t e i9 Mindoro
after joining. in the invasion of at i 'd - .

I

MICHIGAN TRAIN WRECK-Members of a rescue crew look over the wrecked engine and tender of a
Detroit-bound New York Central train in which thv engineer and fireman died near Trenton, Mich.
The locomotive '(left) and tender (right) rolled over into a gully after the train struck a stalled auto.

DYING LIBERATOR-This U. S.
Liberator Bomber plummets earth-
ward over Blechhammer, Germany,
after its tail was shot off by flak
during raid on Obertal refinery.
--A. P. wirephoto

INVEST IN

VICTORY

POST-WAR PROGRAM:
Films To Feature Activities,
Character of Russian People

Six short films on Russia will be
shown by the post-war council from
7:30 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
The movies will reveal the charac-
ter of the Russian people, giving an
account of their diversified activities
in war and peace.
Women Defend Russia
Development of the Russian people
since 1932 will be traced in, "People
'St.Matthew
Passion Will
Be Presented
"St. Matthew Passion" by Johann
Sebastian Bach will be presented in
its entirety in a series of three rec-
ord concerts sponsored by the Stu-
dent Religious Association, begin-
ning at 7:30 p. in., today, in the Lane
Hall library.
Robert Taylor, '45, will discuss the
historical and musical background of
the "St. Matthew Passion" and ex-
plain the music as it proceeds.
Bach's Greatest Achievement
Recognized as the greatest achieve-
ment of Bach's genius, the Passion
is also the culmination of an art
form which played an important role
in the musical and religious history
of Germany.
The story of Christ's betrayal and
crucifixion is narrated in a series of
recitatives interspersed with arias,
duets, four-part chorals and large
choral sections, which amplify the
significance of the story as it un-
folds.
Recorded by Boston Symphony
The work will be performed in
English as recorded during a per-
formance by the Boston Symphony
Orchestra, the Harvard Glee Club
and the Radcliffe Choral Society,
under the direction of Serge Kous-
sevitzky and G. Wallace Woodworth.
Vocal and instrumental soloists also
take pert in the performance.
The first of the three programs
will contain that part of the Passion
dealing with the conspiracy against
Christ, the annointing at Bethany
and the Last Supper.
Scores will be provided. Everyone
interested is invited.
Condon, Famed
As 'Jafsie,' Dies
NEW YORK, Jan. 2.-()- Dr.
John F. Condon, 84, who became
known as "Jafsie" when he figured
in the 'Lindbergh kidnaping as an
intermediary, died today.
The former school principal had
been suffering from pneumonia for
several weeks. He died on the tenth
anniversary of the opening of the
trial which eventually convicted
Bruno Richard Hauptmann of the
kidnap-murder of Charles A. Lind-
bergh, Jr.
Dr. Condon had not been in the
public eye since the trial ended, but
for the four year period between the
kidnaping Marchi 1, 1932 and the
execution of Hauptmann on April 3,
1936, Condon was known to all who

of Russia." This movie will show
how the people educated themselves
and how they have mobilized women,
making them qualified to do any
kind of office.
Scenes of women helping to defend
Russia are included in "One Hundred
Million Women." The movie shows
women operating trains, steam-shov-
els, and subways; running tractors
and nurseries' and carrying arms in
actual battle.
Russia's Strength Shown
"Report from Russia" shows that
Russia's "secret weapon" is the
strength of the Russian people. This
strength includes 19,000,000 women
planting and harvesting crops, 5,-
000,000 women in industry and 5,-
000,000 children on farms and anti-
aircraft batteries, the film will point
out.
Two of the films will give glimpses
of Moscow and Leningrad showing
streets, public buildings, stores, hous-
ing projects and churches. The Dnie-
proges Dam and the Baku oil fields
will appear in the Leningrad film.
"Soviet School Children" pictures
education in the U.S.S.R. from nurs-
ery school through high school. It
will emphasize the importance of
trained youth to the future of the
country.
F ighter Grou
I m
ToCelebrate
2nd irthday,
U.S. EIGHTH AIR FORCE FIGH-
TER STATION, England, Jan. 2.--
(P)-- The U.S. 56th Thunderbolt
I Group, holder of an all-time record
for destruction of German aircraft,
will celebrate its second anniversary
Jan. 6.
On that date the fighter group
will toast the men who compiled a
Luftwaffe death list of more than
800 planes on more than 400 combat
missions.
56th Bagged 611 Planes in Sky
The pace-setting 56th bagged 641
Nazis in the sky and 163 on the
ground. On Aug. 5, 1944, the group
made its greatest combined total for
a single day by erasing nine in the
air and 70 on the ground.
The honor of starting the group on
the record which made it the first in
the Eighth Air Force to win a Presi-
dential citation went to Capt. Walter
Cook, of Cincinnati, O., who belted
down a Focke-Wulfe over Ypres.
Col. Schilling Knocks Off 34
Fifty-one of the group's pilots have
smashed five or more enemy ships
each. Col. David Schilling, Traverse
City, Mich., third commanding offi-
cer, has killed off 24 in the air and
101%/ on the ground, to become the
second leading ace in the European
Theatre of operations.
In addition to Schilling, six pilots
who were with the group when it
formed are still flying regularly, and
have more than five planes to their
credit. They include: Maj. Donovan
Smith, Niles, Mich.
'U' Men To Speak
For Polish Institute

Legislature To
Meet Today at
State Capitol
Kelly To Speak About
Problems Thursday
LANSING, Jan. 2-(UP)-The 63rd
Michigan legislature will convene at
noon Wednesday for its second regu-
lar session of World War II.
Law-makers, already beset with
discussion of a host of serious prob-
lems, must wait until Thursday aft-
ernoon to hear from Governor Kel-
ly his version of what the important
tasks facing them should be. At that
time the Governor will deliver his
formal message to the legislature.
Important problems--the disposi-
tion of a swelling state treasury bal-
ance, tax reforms, governmental re-
organization, a postwar building pro-
gram, and many others, awaited Kel-
ly's message and subsequent maneu-
vering.
In the House, there will be 34
Democrats and 66 Republicans at the
start, compared with 74 Republi-
cans and 26 Democrats two years
ago. In the Senate, there will be 24
Republicans and eight Democrats,
one more Democrat than in the past
session.
Both houses showed an unusual
shortage of experience. The House
listed 40 new members and six for-
mer members among its 100 repre-
sentatives, while the Senate had 11
new members, four of them with pre-
vious experience, in the total of 32.
State -e jwcrat
jLeaves 0iitices
Fry Lost Gubernatorial
Race Last November
LANSING, Jan. 2.-UP)-Ill health,
which nearly retired him to the side-
lines before the election, today
prompted Edward J. Fry, Democratic
candidate for governor in the No-
vember election, to announce his
retirement from politics.
Fry said he would not even be able
to attend his party's state convention
in Flint Jan. 26 and 27.
At the same time Murray D. Van
Wagoner, former governer and for-
mer state highway commissioner, an-
nounced he would not attempt to
make a political comeback in the
spring election as a candidate for
state highway commissioner.
Van Wagoner said he might at-
tend the convention, but that if he
does it will be to head off any effort
to "draft" him to run for office.
Now an engineer in private practice
in Detroit, Van Wagoner said he was
making the statement now "so the
party can be certain of my intentions
and can get behind some strong can-
didate who is willing to make the
race"
Buyers Find
No Furiture
GRAND RAPIDS, Jan. 2.-(P)-
One of the most unusual furniture
markets in the history of Grand
Rapids opened today'with plenty
of buyers but no furniture.
The 135th market, which will last
un'til n 1 9 atracted more than

NIMITZ WEARS INSIGNIA OF FLEET ADMIRAL-Fleet Admiral
Chester W. Niimitz (left) wears the five stars of Fleet Admiral as he
confers with Admiral William F. Halsey aboard the latter's flagship
som'cwhere in the Paific,. This is the first picture of Nimitz wearing
the new insignia.

ES %' F 9' lEA R' PICT RE-Mrs. Dwig ht D. Eisenhower, wife
of the Supreme Allied Coinmand r in western Europe, looks at Time
m.agazines front cover whih designates him as the "Man of the
Year." She said the general has always felt that a leader is only as
good as the men he leads.

,x ;

ROCKETS STREAK ASHORE IN MINDORO BARRAGE-A barrage
of rockets fired from an LCI boat streaks ashore to batter Japanese
defenses as American forces invaded the island of Mindoro in the
Philippines.

BOMiBS i.' lOB RAID ON JAFS-An ordnance officer of the
21st Bomber Comnd headquarters on Saipan attaches fusing
mechanism tbombs in bombay of a Superfortress in preparation for
a raid on Tokyo.

Sharfman- Acts
As Board Head
Emergency Group
Ends Railroad Dispute
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, Chairman of
the Department of Economics, re-
turned Sunday from Harrisburg, Pa.
and Washington, D.C.. where he
served as Chairman of a Railroad
Emergency Board, appointed by the
President Dec. 14.
The Board investigated and re-
ported on an unadjusted dispute -
between the Steelton and Highspire
Railroad Company and its employes
represented by the Brotherhood of

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